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http://archive.org/details/brynmawralumnaeb19bryn 



BRYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 
BULLETIN 




MANUSCRIPT HUNTERS 



January, 1939 



Vol. XIX 



No. 1 



Entered as second-class matter, January 15, IQ21, at the Post Office, Phila., Pa,, tinder Act of March 3, 1879 

COPYRIGHT, 1939 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



OFFICERS OF THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President I da Lauer D arrow, 1921 

Vice-President Yvonne Stoddard Hayes, 1913 

Secretary Dorothea Chambers Blaisdell, 1919 

Treasurer Margaret E. Brusstar, 1903 

Chairman of the Finance Committee Edith Harris YYV.st, 1926 

Dirprtnrs at T srfre [ GERTRUDE HEARNE MYERS, 1919 

Directors at Large j Ellenor Morris, 1927 

ALUMNAE SECRETARY, Mildred Buchanan Bassett, 1924 

EDITOR AND BUSINESS MANAGER OF THE BULLETIN 

Marjorie L. Thompson, 1912 

DISTRICT COUNCILLORS 

District I Elizabeth Lawrence Mendell, 1925 

District II Ruth Cheney Streeter, 1918 

District III Mildred Kimball Ruddock, 1936 

District IV Ruth Biddle Penfield, 1929 

District V Eloise G. ReQua, 1924 

District VI Delia Smith Mares, 1 926 

District VII Katharine Collins Hayes, 1929 

ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 
Eleanor Little Aldrich, 1905 Adelaide W. Neall, 1906 

Mary Alden Morgan Lee, 1912 Ethel C. Dunham, 1914 

Eleanor Marquand Forsyth, 1919 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ALUMNAE FUND 
Edith Harris West, 1926 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 
Louise B. Dillingham, 1916 

CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUND COMMITTEE 
Caroline Lynch Byers, 1920 

CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
Dr. M. Elizabeth Howe, 1924 

CHAIRMAN OF THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE 
Serena Hand Savage, 1922 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Editorial page 1 

Manuscript Hunters, by Phyllis Goodhart Gordan, 1935 page 2 

College Calendar page 6 

The President's Page page 7 

Faculty Notes page 9 

In Memoriam: Anna, Lady Grenfell page 11 

The Jobs of the Classes 1934-1938, 

by Louise Hodges Crenshaw, 1918 page 12 

Undergraduate Notes, by Mary R. Meigs, 1939 page 14 

College Moving Pictures, by Barbara L. Cary, J 936 page 16 

Deanery Notes page 16 

The New York Bryn Mawr Club page 17 

The Alumnae Bookshelf page 1 8 

The Scarlet Oak. By Cornelia Meigs, 1907 
The Presbyterian Congregation of Hazleton. 

By Gladys Jones Mar\le, 1912 
Wisdom's Gate. By Margaret Ayer Barnes, J 907 
The Book of Hugh and Nancy. 

By Eleanor S. Duc\ett, Ph.D., 1914 
Seventy Stories of the Old Testament. 

Compiled by Helen Slocum T^ichols Estahroo\, 1902 
Opening the Old Testament. 

By Margaret Dulles Edwards, 1911 

Letter From an Alumna: Frances F. Jones, 1934 page 23 

Class Notes , page 25 



Bryn Mawr Alumnae 

Bulletin 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 

THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNA ASSOCIATION 

Marjorie L. Thompson, '12, Editor and Business Manager 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, '0? Denise Gallaudet Francis, *32 

Emily Kimbrough Wrench, '21 Louise Congdon Francis, '00 

Pamela Burr, '28 Barbara L. Gary, *36 

Ida Lauer D arrow, '21, ex'ofiicio 

Subscription Price, $1.50 a Tear Single Copies, 25 Cents 

Checks should be drawn to the order of Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 

Published monthly, except August, September and October, at 1006 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

All material should be sent to the Alumnae Office the first of each month. 

Vol. XIX JANUARY, 1939 No. 1 

It is not by chance that the Form of Bequest that has been appearing in the 
Bulletin for so many years no longer makes the Alumnae Association the beneficiary. 
Should someone "give and bequeath to the Association a sum to be safely invested 
"by it, the interest of this sum to be applied to such work as is entered into by said 
Alumnae Association," we should find our hands tremendously strengthened. To have 
the College the beneficiary, however, is a truer expression of the whole aim of the 
Association and of its relation to the College. We realise absolutely that unless the 
Association is strong and well organised and comprehensive in its membership, an 
alive and growing thing, it cannot serve the College adequately. On the other hand 
we are genuinely altruistic; we do not want things for ourselves but for the College. 
And we want the College to have what it needs for its best development, rather than 
to give it only those things that we are perhaps interested in giving. The emphasis 
put, year in and year out, on the desirability of Undesignated Gifts to the Alumnae 
Fund is one of the manifestations of this attitude of mind. This page has quoted in 
this connection before what the March Hare pointed out to Alice: that "I like what 
I get" is not the same as "I get what I like." That the College shall get what it likes, 
the designated objects of the Fund are chosen only after careful consultation by the 
Joint Committee, which is made up of representatives of the Association and of the 
Board of Directors of the College. This Joint Committee might well serve also as a 
Committee on Bequests, and could point out immediate and future needs and the 
ways of meeting them in drawing a will. From time to time the Bulletin will carry 
different Forms of Bequest, — such as those for the endowment of professors' salaries or 
for a specific professorship, for scholarship aid, for general endowment or for a 
general bequest, — to indicate a few. These last two — general endowment or general 
bequest — are the type that in the long run are most helpful to the College. To cite 
only two instances, had not Sophie Boucher, 1903, made a general bequest, there 
would not now be a renovated Dalton, and had not Ella Riegel, 1899, left a sum to 
the College for general endowment, as well as her gift for the Archaeological Fellow- 
ship, and her earlier gift for the M. Carey Thomas Library, much that has been done 
by the College in carrying out its new plans would have had to be left undone. 
We should all like to be able to play fairy godmother, but even $100 makes something 
possible, although $100,000 of course makes many things possible. 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



MANUSCRIPT HUNTERS 

By PHYLLIS GOODHART GORDAN, 1935 



WE had not meant to become 
dwellers in libraries, but our first 
experience in a European library 
in the summer of 1925, when we visited 
Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, per' 
manently addicted us to this form of 
entertainment. We saw the earliest mami' 
script of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle and 
an illuminated manuscript of the Bible 
with a capital O showing Jonah climbing 
up a ladder out of the whale's mouth. It 
may have been the depressed expression 
of the whale; it may have been the fact 
that we had been taught manuscript writ' 
ing at school and urged to think of 
ourselves as successors of the monks in 
their scriptoria; at any rate our interest 
in manuscripts was aroused. After a 
time, the smell of crumbling leather bind- 
ings became our favorite and the only 
leaves we could recognise at a glance 
were those of the British Museum cat- 
alogue. 

Four years later we went to the con- 
tinent. Since my father had read about 
Cabalistic manuscripts we were in search 
of these. We asked for them unsuccess- 
fully in Amsterdam and Leyden and 
again in Utrecht, but in Utrecht the 
librarians were so sorry to disappoint us 
that they brought out a beautifully illumi- 
nated manuscript of The City of God. 
We tried again in Bonn and in Heidel- 
berg where we saw the thirteenth cen- 
tury Minnesinger manuscript with full- 
page pictures of musical entertainments. 
Finally, the Professor of Semitics in 
Munich showed us several Cabalistic 
manuscripts in the University library. 
They were written in Aramaic, Spanish, 
and Latin with long Hebrew and Arabic 
passages, and marginal diagrams of dots, 



representing the mathematical working- 
out of Biblical prophecies. 

In 1933, we went to see the Ambro- 
sian Library in Milan. We must have 
been very troublesome to Monsignor Gal- 
biati, the prefect, who had to be consulted 
personally about everything we saw. First 
we looked at Petrarch's copy of the 
Aeneid, with Petrarch's own notes. It 
was kept in a folio-sized tin box, each 
book of the Aeneid in a separate folder 
and the oak and leather binding empty. 
The librarian told us that they had taken 
the book apart to make an exact facsimile 
in 1930 and found that it suffered less 
strain unbound. 

Next day we saw the palimpsest of 
Plautus which Dr. Broughton had de- 
scribed in first-year Latin. This manu- 
script was written in the fourth century 
and several centuries later the monks 
rubbed off the text of Plautus with pum- 
ice and wrote the Vulgate in its place. 
In 1815 Cardinal Mai noticed that part 
of the Plautine text showed through and 
took off the upper writing with acid. By 
1933, the acid had so reacted with the 
original ink that the Plautine writing was 
eaten away and the lines were like lace- 
work. Each page was in a separate folder 
and an attendant handled it with a pie- 
knife. Later the prefect showed us some 
leaves of a third century Iliad and told 
us about the foundation of the library by 
Cardinal Borromeo in the seventeenth 
century. Agents collected books all over 
Europe and the East and the Cardinal 
founded fellowships at the library to sup- 
port the men who worked on the unpub- 
lished material. He showed us the diffi- 
cult system of cataloguing: the Cardinal 
expressly forbade any printed catalogue 



[2] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 






and every book or manuscript, old or 
new, is written down indiscriminately in 
a large notebook and afterwards can be 
traced only by the date of its arrival. We 
left with a quantity of booklets about 
the library and a signed photograph of 
the prefect. 

In 1934 we began our serious pursuit 
of libraries. I had written a report for 
Miss Taylor on the manuscript discov- 
eries of Poggio Bracciolini, a fifteenth 
century humanist. To find material about 
him my father had started collecting in' 
cunabula, books printed in the fifteenth 
century, and by summertime we were 
working in the British Museum on a fif- 
teenth century writer named Laurentius 
Abstemius. He had deceived us because 
we had bought from a catalogue his little 
book De Quibusdam Locis Obscuris, ex- 
pecting a guidebook, but it turned out to 
be On Certain Obscure Places in Livy 
and Valerius Maximus. Although the 
Museum provided us with such distrac- 
tions as Indians, people in Isadora Dun- 
can costumes, and Bryn Mawr friends, 
we managed also to take notes on the 
contents of every manuscript in the Mu- 
seum listed under the name of Poggio. 
We were thrilled when the guards let us 
go into the manuscript-room without 
showing our cards and even more thrilled 
to be recognized the following year. 

Meanwhile, we went to York and 
spent a morning hearing about the Dean 
and Chapter's having had to sell the Cax- 
tons and the best incunabula to Dr. 
Rosenbach in Philadelphia in order to 
raise money to repair the central tower 
of the Minster. The librarian showed us 
the remaining incunabula and took us to 
the Chapter House to see the manuscripts 
which they had not had to sell. 

After we left York we did an archi- 
tectural and bibliographical tour of Lin- 
coln. We found the librarian, Canon 



Kynaston, reading in his garden and he 
took us upstairs to a long room with a 
polished, billowy floor and bookcases to 
the ceiling. Most of them were filled with 
church records and prayerbooks, but at 
one end were cases of rare books that the 
cathedral has owned for centuries. We 
spent the afternoon looking at a copy of 
the Caxton Golden Legend and at a man- 
uscript of the Canterbury Tales which 
the cathedral has owned since about 1400. 
When Elizabeth Chamberlayne, 1935, 
and I went back to see Canon Kynaston 
the following summer he had discovered 
a page giving directions as to equipment 
to the first people who wanted to "plant" 
in New England. They were advised, as 
the water did not agree with most people, 
to bring along beer. Canon Kynaston told 
us that so many Americans had bought 
photostats of it that he had been able to 
start a new catalogue of the library. 

Next we crossed to Normandy to see 
Caen and found the library in two pan- 
elled rooms in the Hotel de Ville. In 
the first were exhibition cases of incunab- 
ula and, incongruously, a lock of Na- 
poleon's hair. A man in sheepskin bed- 
room slippers was skidding around the 
floor polishing it. The second room con- 
tained ten aged gentlemen who had taken 
off their shoes and gone to sleep in the 
sun. After a while we felt obliged to 
wake up the librarian and ask for a man- 
uscript of Einhard, but it turned out to 
be at Cherbourg and we crept away. 

When we reached Paris, we tried to 
work on Poggio in the Bibliotheque Na- 
tionale. Since I had not yet received a 
B.A., they would let us see the old and 
unfinished catalogues but no books. We 
had an exciting experience discovering the 
Bibliotheque Mazarine in a lovely court- 
yard on the left bank. The books, even 
the Gutenberg Bible, were just as Car- 
dinal Mazarin left them. 



[3] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



In 1936, I went to Radcliffe to study 
Greek manuscripts with Professor and 
Mrs. Lake. When Helen Ripley, 1935, 
and I went abroad that summer, we did 
some work for their publication Dated 
Gree\ Minuscule Manuscripts. In the 
Bodleian we went through the catalogues 
of all manuscripts owned in England, list' 
ing every manuscript that contained a 
date before 1200. We found two in the 
British Museum that Professor Lake had 
missed and we had a new experience in 
handling them because instead of being 
held open on stands with bags of bird- 
shot, they were put into velvet-lined 
wooden boxes with glass lids. We took 
notes on their size and coloring and ar- 
ranged to have them photographed. 

We also had an interview with Mr. 
Scholderer, the curator of incunabula, 
about some Pseudo-Hellenistic writings 
printed in 1498. We were directed to 
meet him behind the eleventh cat-goddess 
on the left side of the Egyptian gallery. 
He escorted us into his office in the stacks, 
which so impressed us that we could 
barely pay attention to his explanations 
of the forgery. 

We asked permission to visit the Royal 
Library at Windsor to see the only per- 
fect copy of Caxton's Aesop, which con- 
tains some of Poggio's Facetiae. We were 
shown Queen Anne's gloves and the ex- 
tra shirt that Charles I. wore to his execu- 
tion, but we were not allowed to see the 
Poggio pages in the Aesop because the 
stories were too ribald. 

The next library we visited was in 
Lambeth Palace. We examined an appar- 
ently undated manuscript which had, half 
way through, a sentence in red ink full 
of abbreviations. It looked like "the 
month of September 110-". We told the 
assistant librarian that it should be men- 
tioned in the catalogue; she invited us 
back to show it to Canon Jenkins, the 



head librarian. We almost managed to 
convince him when he had a sudden in- 
spiration and read it to us as "Pray for 
the soul of Simeon the Stylite. ,, 

We found our first dated manuscript 
in Cambridge in Corpus Christi College 
library which had changed considerably 
in ten years. It had added a museum and 
contained Greek vases, Roman coins and 
a model lake dwellers' village. From there 
we went to Trinity College to see a man- 
uscript dated 1107 by Porson in the 
eighteenth century. Porson had treated 
the date with galls and completely black- 
ened it. We could not see it in any light, 
but since the manuscript was officially 
dated and the date, though invisible, still 
attached to it, we decided it should be 
photographed. We learned from the cata- 
logue that there was a controversy about 
the number of scribes who had worked 
on the manuscript. I thought two, and 
Helen Ripley, who did not know Greek, 
insisted on five: the librarian agreed with 
her, which persuaded us to have five 
photographs taken and let Professor and 
Mrs. Lake decide. 

On our trip to Scotland and Ireland 
we saw no manuscripts until we reached 
Trinity College, Dublin, and the Boo\ 
of Kells, an eighth century manuscript of 
the Gospels with probably the most intri- 
cate and beautiful illuminations in the 
world. Originally it was kept in a gold 
shrine in the great church at Kells; it 
was stolen in 1006 and found months 
later in a ditch without the shrine. The 
book survived remarkably well and is 
always on view, under magnifying glasses 
so that the endless intertwining of shapes 
and colors can be seen. We saw twelve 
pages by going to the library every morn- 
ing we were in Dublin, because they 
showed a different page each day. 

When we arrived back in England, we 
reached the climax of our adventures 



[4] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



with manuscripts. We went directly to 
Cheltenham to see Sir Thomas Phillips 1 
collection. The catalogue he printed lists 
thirty thousand manuscripts, but he is 
supposed to have left as many uncata- 
logued. His grandson, T. Fitsroy Fen- 
wick, a delightful man about 80, owns 
the collection now and lives in a house 
like Buckingham Palace, surrounded by 
a high wall. Although we had been told 
at home and at Oxford that Mr. Fen- 
wick would not allow us to see his books, 
we decided to send him the "To whom it 
may concern 1 ' letter that Professor Lake 
had given us. Having received no an- 
swer, we called and waited while some- 
one peered at us over the windowsill of 
a pavilion opposite the front door. We 
were told that Mr. Fenwick was at the 
races but would expect us next morning. 
We were sure he would tell us to leave 
immediately but instead he settled us at 
a desk with a view through four living 
rooms and a picture gallery. We got on 
very well because we had made a list of 
the twenty-five dated or undescribed 
manuscripts we wanted to see. We felt 
sorry that there were so many because 
we knew that the books were kept in 
packing cases high on shelves and that 
Mr. Fenwick had to find everything him- 
self. 

He brought us four beautiful tenth and 
eleventh century manuscripts with very 
legible dates, which we could copy and 
take notes on but he would not consent 
to a photographer's coming in; he 
showed us manuscript rolls with hundreds 
of tiny figures performing religious cere- 
monies, and several Gospel manuscripts 
with portraits of the evangelists covering 
whole folio pages. We worked for three 
days, unsupervised except when Mr. Fen- 
wick fortified us with hot-house peaches. 
Another bit of excitement was our dis- 
covery of a real, though not live, book- 



worm. It had eaten far into the book, 
spun a cocoon, and then perished. We 
picked it out carefully and Mr. Fenwick 
put it in his pocket and took it away. 
We had heard that Mr. Fenwick kept 
people out by charging them a pound a 
day, but he refused to charge us any- 
thing because he had never before had 
two American college girls come to study 
his Greek manuscripts. 

Cheltenham proved that it would be 
wise to take our own photographs. We 
carried a Leica to Oslo, Stockholm, Lund, 
Copenhagen and to Carolina Rediviva, 
the library in Upsala. We found every- 
where wonderful collections of incunab- 
ula and Grolier bindings and saw beau- 
tiful illuminated Greek manuscripts in the 
very pretty library in Copenhagen. 

Our last adventure ended in disappoint- 
ment. We had a Latin roll, nine feet 
long, written illegibly late in the four- 
teenth century, describing the crimes of 
Richard II.'s friends. Since it came from 
the library of Craven Ord, archivist to 
the Dukes of Northumberland, we 
thought that it might have been Northum- 
berland's own copy of the paper he pre- 
sents to Richard in the play. The Deputy 
Keeper of the Record Office told us that 
Mr. Galbraith at Oxford knew all about 
Richard II. We told Mr. Galbraith about 
the similarity of our roll to 1387 in the 
Parliamentary Records, and about our 
Shakespearian analysis. He took us to 
the Institute for Historical Research, 
where we immediately found our roll 
published in the 1926 volume of the Cam- 
den Society from a beautifully written 
and illuminated Bodleian manuscript. It 
was an unimportant chronicle of the reign 
of Richard II., with particular emphasis 
on his misdeeds. 

Though this may seem a dry way to 
travel to Europe we enjoyed it because 
it gave us a bond with people in foreign 



m 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 

countries and a chance to work with otherwise. They were more enthusiastic 

them. It made us feel at home abroad than curators in museums and palaces be' 

because the musty smell of a library is cause they saw less of tourists and did 

the same everywhere. It showed us how not think of us as sightseers, and they 

kind everyone was the minute we ex- seemed always to have time. Perhaps it 

pressed an interest in his work and the was the combination of work and leisure 

librarians showed us a great many beau' that always drew us back to the libraries 

tiful things which we could not have seen of Europe. 

COLLEGE CALENDAR 

Sunday, January 8th — 4.30 p.m., The Deanery 

Dr. Axel Boethius, distinguished Swedish Archaeologist, will speak on Architecture of Imperial 
Rome and Its Importance for Mediaeval Times, under the auspices of the Department of 
Archaeology. 

Sunday, January 8th — 7.30 p.m., Music Room, Goodhart Hall 

The Reverend George A. Butterick, Minister of the Madison Avenue Presbyterian Church in 
New York City, will conduct the service. 

Monday, January 9 — 8.30 p.m., The Deanery 

Dr. Frederich Spiegelberg, Visiting Professor of Philosophy at Columbia University and for- 
merly Professor of Sanskrit and Pali at Dresden University, will speak on Toga and Surrealism 
under the auspices of the History of Art Department. 

Tuesday, January 1 0th — 4.30 p.m., Music Room, Goodhart Hall 

Professor Sherman Oberly of the University of Pennsylvania will speak on Mental Testing 
in the African Bush under the auspices of the Psychology Department. Moving pictures 
will be shown and ethnological material will be on display. 

Friday, January 13th — 8.30 p.m., Goodhart Hall 

The Yale Puppeteers will present It's a Small "World. This performance is for the benefit of 

the Alumnae Regional Scholarship Fund of Eastern Pennsylvania, Southern New Jersey and 

Delaware. 

Tickets: $1.25, $1.00. Unreserved seats, $.75. Tickets on sale in the Publicity Office. 

Monday, January 16th — 8.30 p.m., Goodhart Hall 

Sir Ronald Storrs, Former Military and Civil Governor of Jerusalem, will speak on The 

Problem of Palestine. 

Tickets: Reserved front section, $1.00. General admission, $.50. 

Tuesday, February 7th — 8.30 p.m., Goodhart Hall 

Myra Hess, famous pianist, will give a recital. This is the third in the College Entertainment 

Series. 

Tickets: $3.00, $2.50, and $2.00. 



The alumnae will be interested to know that in the plans for the changes in 
the Library, there is included space for a treasure'room so that the Bryn Mawr 
collection of rare books, including a number of incunabula, may be both more 
adequately housed and readily available. 

[6] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



THE PRESIDENT'S PAGE 



NO one can this year run through 
the calendar of events in the Bul- 
LETIN or read comment in the 
College J\[ews without pleased astonish' 
ment! To see at Bryn Mawr in eight 
short weeks Edna St. Vincent Millay, 
Judge Allen, Margaret Bondfield and 
Frances Perkins, Paul Green, Kreisler, 
Ruth Draper, Myra Hess, Martha Gra- 
ham and Sandburg, to mention only 
names we all know, is rich fare. There is 
no monotony in a routine which is broken 
into by these meteors. 

There are two obvious comments. 
In a hard-working college and especially 
in these difficult days we are thankful 
for the pure enjoyment and relief from 
tension which our visitors bring. We are 
also glad to add in quantity and quality 
to the concerts and lectures we can open 
to our neighbors. The gift of Goodhart 
Hall made this possible ten years ago and 
we have felt definitely the more friendly 
interest which is its result. At the mc 
ment, however, I wish to speak of a spe- 
cial and, I think, interesting side of such 
a programme. 

Like many other Bryn Mawr graduates 
I am a believer in the small college. It 
seems to me to present advantages to stu- 
dents, perhaps in particular to women, 
valuable enough to outweigh the disad- 
vantages it also presents. We who be- 
lieve in it, however, are responsible for 
recognising its disadvantages and — much 
more difficult — for meeting them as we 
can. 

One of our problems I believe is the 
necessary limitation in number of the 
faculty, and consequently in the variety 
of instruction which can be offered. The 
groundwork of each department is of 
course fully presented, but in the ad- 
vanced work only certain fields can ap- 



pear. These are carefully chosen for their 
importance in the students 1 training, but 
other fields only less valuable must be 
omitted or handed over to marginal treat- 
ment by the instructor or to supervised 
reading by the student. Bacteriology for 
instance reappears in the curriculum this 
year after seven years of absence. An- 
thropology, never before given, is being 
offered. But other courses perhaps equally 
striking and important are still off our 
list. The small college can not wholly 
meet the problem, but I should like to 
point out two steps which Bryn Mawr is 
taking in the direction of meeting it and 
to amplify one of them. The first! un- 
amplified here but mentioned in earlier 
Bulletins, is the increasing use of our 
bond of co-operation with the University 
of Pennsylvania, Swarthmore and Haver- 
ford. One undergraduate is this year 
taking Botany at Haverford and five 
graduates (Latin, History, Economics and 
Politics, Chemistry) are studying at the 
University. 

The second is the use of the outside 
lecturer as an instructor. Bryn Mawr is, 
namely, not only adding to its entertain- 
ment by the guests it brings, but spe- 
cifically to its teaching. In two major 
instances this addition is a formal one. 
Each Flexner and Shaw Lecturer, as part 
of his bond, teaches for the six weeks of 
his residence one, or possibly two courses. 
Such classes are included in the semester's 
work for the students; for example, the 
content is included in the material of- 
fered by the seniors for the final exam- 
ination. The Shaw lecturer of 1936-1937, 
Mrs. Barbara Wootton, of the University 
of London, taught an advanced under- 
graduate course in Economic Thought 
and a graduate seminary in Labour Or- 
ganization. In the second semester of 



[7] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



19374938 the Flexner lecturer, Professor 
Edwin Gay, met graduate and under- 
graduate students for weekly two-hour 
conferences during his stay, discussing 
with them The Industrial Revolution of 
the Eighteenth Century and lectured 
regularly twice a week to the class in 
Second Year History on The Economic 
Development of the Late T^ineteenth 
Century. The second Flexner lecturer of 
last year, Professor Erwin Panofsky, who 
came on the understanding that he could 
not stay in residence, did actually remain 
for the mornings following his seven eve- 
ning lectures and held lively and profit- 
able conferences with a large group of 
students drawn from various departments 
interested in the Mediaeval Period. Judge 
Allen also, who gives the six Shaw lec- 
tures of this year and who can not, nat- 
urally, rearrange her heavy court duties 
in order to remain in residence during a 
six-weeks period, will spend a week and 
possibly two at Bryn Mawr during the 
next semester and devote herself to stu- 
dent conferences and discussion. 

Besides the two series, Bryn Mawr has 
two endowments providing a single an- 
nual lecture.* This autumn the Sheble 
Lecturer in English Literature, Paul 
Green, Lecturer on Dramatic Art at the 
University of North Carolina and author 
of two Pulitzer Prise Plays, In Abraham's 
Bosom and Johnny Johnson, stayed at 
Bryn Mawr three days and in addition to 
his public lecture met the students inter- 
ested in playwriting for two long sessions 
and went over manuscript plays with any- 
one who had them ready. The Webster 
Lecture in History was given in Decem- 
ber by Miss Elisabeth Wiskemann, Tutor 
in Modern History at Cambridge; author 



*A third, the Horace White Memorial 
Lecture in Classical Literature, was given dur- 
ing the years 1926-33, but to our great dis- 
appointment was not made permanent. 



of Czechs and Germans; and associated 
with the Royal Institute of International 
Affairs. Miss Wiskemann also met Dr. 
Gray's class in Modern European History 
for two hours and discussed with them 
the questions arising from her subject. 

But besides these general lectures there 
are also single lectures arranged by indi- 
vidual departments or combination of de- 
partments, often interesting to the College 
at large, but chosen, both lecturer and 
subject, definitely to broaden the field 
with which the department itself deals. 
Thus, in the past autumn the Department 
of Social Economy has arranged a confer- 
ence at which Margaret Bondfield, Min- 
ister of Labour of Great Britain, 1929 to 
1931, and Frances Perkins, Secretary of 
Labour of the United States, presented for 
England and the United States The Rela- 
tion of Government to Organized Labour, 
and a lecture and discussion by William 
Duncan Strong, Associate Professor of 
Anthropology at Columbia University 
and leader of many archaeological expedi- 
tions in Labrador, the far West and Cen- 
tral America for the United States Bureau 
of American Ethnology, who spoke on 
Early Man in the 7<[ew World. The 
French Department has brought to the 
College Professor Paul Hazard, Professeur 
au College de France, who spoke on 
Jean de la Fontaine et Jean Giraudoux. 
Archaeology will have three departmental 
lecturers during the second semester: 
Swedish scholars, Dr. Axel Boethius and 
Dr. M. P. Nilsson, and the British Ar- 
chaeologist, A. J. B. Wace, in addition to 
three lectures by Dr. Hetty Goldman, 
Director of the Bryn Mawr Tarsus Exca- 
vation. The Department of the History 
of Art has already taken advantage of the 
gift by an alumna of two lectures by Pro- 
fessor Felix Salmony to send all its stu- 
dents to hear him speak on Chinese 
Bronzes and Chinese Jades, and the De- 



[8] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



partments of Art and Psychology have 
united to arrange a lecture by Dr. Fried- 
rich Spiegelberg, of Columbia Univer- 
sity, on Toga and Surrealism. Other de- 
partmental lectures for the second semes- 
ter are not yet announced. To them 
should be added the technical speakers 
invited by the Philosophy and the Science 
Clubs for their own members. 

Again, members of our own faculty 
often speak to variously assorted groups 
or to the whole College on special sub- 
jects. Everyone knows of Dr. Fenwick's 
weekly talks on current events. In his 
absence, Miss Northrop (Economics), Dr. 
Gillet (Spanish) and Miss de Laguna 
(Anthropology) are speaking on special 
subjects. In four weeks in April a series 
of seven or eight lectures on the Phenom- 
ena of Art will be given by Dr. Bern- 
heimer (History of Art), Dr. Nahm 
(Philosophy), Dr. Carpenter (Archaeol- 
ogy and History of Art) and by an out- 
side psychologist. This rapid-fire course 



will be parallel to the series of two years 
ago on Man, and, as two years ago, the 
lectures will be in every case followed by 
conference and discussion. Such series as 
these two I can but hope are forerunners 
of courses in the humanities and the so- 
cial sciences presenting fields not com- 
pletely new, but relating to the courses 
now given. 

Years ago Professor Mary Gwinn said 
to a group of undergraduates who were 
crying out on a disappointing genius in 
the old Chapel, that the occasional lec- 
turer did little more than provide a fron- 
tispiece for his works. This is a service 
still not entirely useless! But the occa- 
sional lecturer can also be very profitably 
harnessed to our efforts to broaden out 
our teaching. When he is good, he is very 
good indeed. It is to insure his quantity 
and quality, as well as for other reasons, 
that I should like as soon as possible to 
restore to the budget the item for lec- 
tures dropped because of the depression. 



FACULTY NOTES 



DURING the Christmas vacation 
many members of the faculty took 
a bus-man's holiday, either here on 
campus or in other cities. In the latter 
group are those who attended conferences 
and meetings on subjects pertaining to 
their particular field. 

Of these Dr. MacKinnon of the Psy- 
chology Department went to Cornell 
University for the meeting of the Society 
of Topological Psychology. This society 
was formed several years ago from a 
nuclear group started by Dr. Levine of 
the University of Berlin, who was present 
at the Christmas meeting this year. Dr. 
Fairchild of the Department of Social 
Economy attended the American Socio- 

[ 



logical Conference in Detroit on Decem- 
ber 28th, 29th, 30th. The Italian, French, 
German, and Spanish Departments went 
to the Modern Language Association 
which this year held its meetings in New 
York, at the Hotel Pennsylvania and at 
Columbia University. Dr. Max Dies, 
Chairman of the Goethe group, pre- 
sided at its meetings. The Geologists too 
went in large numbers to New York for 
a meeting of the Geological Society. And 
while speaking of Geologists it is of inter- 
est to note that Dr. Watson, professor at 
Bryn Mawr, was this year elected Presi- 
dent of the Philadelphia Geological So- 
ciety, which holds monthly meetings at 
the Academy of Natural Sciences. 



9] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Providence, Rhode Island, also wel- 
comed a large number of Bryn Mawr 
professors for several days. The Greek 
Archaeological Institute of America held 
its annual meeting there and Dr. Car- 
penter took part in a symposium on the 
Frontiers of Gree\ Civilization. A branch 
of this Institute is the Philological Society, 
of which Dr. Lily Taylor is a member 
of the Executive Committee. Besides her 
duties on this board she also repre- 
sented Bryn Mawr at the annual meet- 
ing of the Advisory Council of the 
American Academy in Rome. Dr. Miiller 
likewise attended these meetings in 
Providence. To Providence also went 
many chemists both from universities here 
and abroad to attend a meeting of Physi- 
cal Chemists and to be present at the 
dedication of a new science building at 
Brown University. Dr. Crenshaw took 
part in a special symposium at the time 
of the dedicatory ceremonies. 

Philosophy was the subject of meetings 
at Wesleyan University during the vaca- 
tion and Dr. Grace DeLaguna among 
others was present. Dr. Dies besides his 
duties at the Modern Language meetings 
also had to meet with the Executive 
Council of the National Advisory Com- 
mittee of the German Junior Year abroad. 
He is secretary of the organisation and 
he said before leaving that they planned 
to discuss the advisability of moving the 
Junior Year next year from Munich to 
Zurich in view of the present unsettled 
conditions. The results of those discus- 
sions are not yet known as this goes to 
press. 

Several members of the faculty said 
they were going to take a rest from all 
work, while others planned to work on 
future publications. Two publications 
that have recently come out might be 

[10 



mentioned here: one, by Dr. MacKinnon 
in collaboration with Dr. Henry A. 
Murray and workers in the Harvard 
Psychological Clinic, is entitled Explora- 
tion in Personality; the other, edited by 
Dr. Caroline Robbins, is the Diary of 
John Milward, Esq. This gentleman was 
a Member of Parliament for Derbyshire 
from September, 1666, to May, 1668. 
This is a private diary, never before 
printed, of Parliamentary affairs at a time 
when such records are particularly scarce. 
It is full of the procedure of the day and 
therefore important in the history of Par- 
liament. It also gives a picture of Lon- 
don just after the Great Fire and of the 
typical Englishman of the day. Besides 
the diary there is an Introduction dealing 
with the man and his times, a bibliography 
of other contemporary Parliamentary 
records, a chronological guide and a list 
of persons. 

The alumnae will also be interested to 
hear of some earlier meetings in which 
members of the Bryn Mawr faculty took 
part. 

By invitation of the Committee on Pro- 
gram, Dr. G. A. Hedlund, of the Depart- 
ment of Mathematics (now on leave at 
the Institute for Advanced Studies at 
Princeton), addressed the American 
Mathematical Society in New York on 
October 29th. 

On November 14th, 15th and 16th, 
representatives of the forty- eight States 
were called together in Washington by 
Secretary of Labour Perkins to discuss ac- 
complishments, programs and problems in 
the field of labor legislation. The meet- 
ing gave an unusual opportunity to dis- 
cuss with the Administrator how the 
Federal Fair Labour Standards Act can 
be administered so as to tie in with State 
labour law administration, and to discuss 
State action supplementing and extend- 

] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



ing the Federal standards. Dr. Mildred 
Fairchild of the Department of Social 
Economy attended the conference at Miss 
Perkins' invitation. While it was primar- 
ily a conference of official delegates ap- 
pointed by the Governors of the States, 
a few individuals with special knowledge 
and interest in the field of labour legisla- 
tion were included in the group. 

Dr. Hertha Kraus, of the same depart- 
ment, went the week-end of December 
10th to Washington to a conference of 
the American Management Association. 

Two tributes which mark his interest 
in racial groups have recently been paid 



Dr. H. A. Miller of the Department 
of Social Economy. On December 2nd he 
was adopted by the Eel Clan of the On- 
ondaga tribe of the Iroquois Indians, and 
with the ancient and impressive cere- 
monial was made a chief, with the name 
of Ka yhah na ree (One Who Knows). 
He is president of the International In- 
stitute of Philadelphia. 

On December 14th Dr. Miller was 
called to Washington, to the C^echo-Slo- 
vakian Legation, to receive the very dis- 
tinguished and rarely bestowed Order of 
the White Lion of C^echo-Slovakia as a 
mark of appreciation of the help and 
friendship he had given the nation. 



IN MEMORIAM 

ANNA ELIZABETH CLADWELL McCLANAHAN, LADY GRENFELL, 1906 



ANNA, Lady Grenfell, died in Bos- 
AA ton on December 9th. Kathleen 
Norris once said that women have 
produced so few great works of art be- 
cause they were too busy living their 
masterpieces. That is Anne's biography 
in a sentence. After an impetuous court- 
ship she married Sir Wilfred Grenfell in 
Lake Forest in November, 1909, and 
went with him to Labrador. There she 
learned the difficulties and compensations 
of a pioneer's wife. All of her three 
children were born at St. Anthony. She 
travelled home with her eldest son as a 
baby in a tiny boat that was beset by 
terrible storms. She drove reindeer and 
when they ran away checked them by 
steering them into a nearby wall. She 
rejoiced in her wisely provisioned store- 
room when Earl Grey and sixteen of his 



friends "dropped in" for lunch in a land 
where the grocery is not around the cor- 
ner. As the years mounted Sir Wilfred 
faced the necessity of establishing his 
work on a sound financial basis. Leaving 
the actual medical work to his younger 
successors he and Anne put all their 
energies into raising money. She organ- 
ised sales of Labrador products all over 
the country, managed her husband's lec- 
ture tours, and finally started the Dog 
Team Tavern in Vermont. Since Sir 
Wilfred's retirement in 1934 due to ill 
health she not only nursed him faithfully 
but carried on as well the constant col- 
lecting of funds. She has finished her 
task, but the memory of her untiring and 
beautiful devotion will inspire others to 
take up her work. 

Louise Cruice Sturdevant, 1906. 



[11] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



THE JOBS OF THE CLASSES 19344938 



MRS. GILBRETH reviewed in the 
last issue of the Bulletin Clara 
Belle Thompson's book on getting 
jobs when over forty, and it may be a 
good time to put in a word about getting 
jobs when just out of college. There 
seem to be a good many rumours. Our 
office has been asked among other things 
why all recent Bryn Mawr graduates 
work in department stores, why an A.B. 
is no good without a business course and 
why no one goes in for teaching any 
more. Here is what we know — or think 
we know, for we include some rumours, 
too — about paid occupations of the five 
classes from 1934 through 1938. 

In the first place, these alumnae have 
done wonderfully well in getting jobs. 
They have got them through various 
agencies, including the College,* and 
through their own efforts. There have 
been about four hundred A.B.'s in the five 
classes. In these five years two hundred 
and fifty have wanted jobs but about 
20 did not seem very seriously interested, 
and of the remaining 230, 215 have had 
them. Of the then remaining 15, several 
have temporary jobs now, with others on 
the verge of something permanent — and 
some have just come on the market any 
way. Here it is only fair to say that the 
figures include 65 about whom we have 
no firsthand information — just rumours 
— and we offer apologies to any of these 
that we have put into wrong categories. 

They have also done wonderfully well 
in getting jobs their first year out of Cob 
lege — 157 of these 250 and this figure in- 
eludes no rumours but does include prac- 
tically a hundred per cent of the alumnae 
seriously looking for a job who continued 
looking after early October. Some who 

*22% of the positions were obtained through 
the Bureau of Recommendations, and 11% 
through various college departments. 



[12 



would probably have taken a job if one 
had turned up earlier, decided when 
autumn came, to take some course of 
study instead. 

Teachers and non-teachers are fairly 
equally divided in the case of these alum- 
nae in their first year out of College. The 
157 are divided into 69 teachers and 88 
non-teachers. Non-teachers begin to draw 
ahead after the second year. Of 170 
alumnae from these five classes now with 
jobs, 66 are teaching and 104 have other 
occupations, while if we leave out 1937 
and 1938, there are only 38 teachers 
from the other three classes as against 73 
with other occupations. About the same 
percentage of those who began in either 
category have continued in it, but fewer 
of those who began working after their 
first year have gone into teaching than 
into other occupations. 

There are many more in teaching than 
in any other one occupation, in fact, more 
than twice as many. Eighty-four from 
these five classes have taught while the 
next largest field, office work, has only 3 1 . 
The 84 are about equally divided into 
those who started as apprentices — many 
of them, however, with small salaries — 
and those who began with regular paid 
jobs, the regular ones leading by 44 to 
40. Of the present 66 teachers, 5 are in 
colleges and 25 are working with youn? 
children in either elementary or inter- 
mediate grades. 

There has been a great variety of occu- 
pations among the non-teachers. The 
largest group comprises office workers of 
one kind or another — secretaries in school 
or college offices, in social welfare agen- 
cies, in various business firms, secretaries 
to physicians, professors and writers. 
There are 31 of these. The next largest 
group is with newspapers, magazines and 
publishing companies in capacities other 

1 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



than secretarial. There are 17 of these. 
Close to them in numbers are laboratory 
workers and department store workers 
with 13 each. Social work has 11, mu- 
seums 8, libraries 8, publicity offices 8, 
research organizations or individuals 7 — 
including two workers on the National 
Resources Committee of the Govern- 
ment — banks and insurance companies 6. 
Other occupations include 4 professional 
or semi-professional actresses, play pro- 
ducers, playwrights, 2 singers, 2 law- 
yers — perhaps — 1 doctor, 1 nurse, 1 mu- 
seum photographer, 1 commercial artist, 
1 painter of murals, 1 writer of radio 
script, 1 petrographer connected with ar 
archaeological excavation. The unknown 
65 are partly included in these figures 
and we may have many mistakes. 

Practically half these four hundred 
A.B/s have taken further training, 92 
having gone to colleges or universities, 
the next largest number, 38, having taken 
business courses. Sixteen have gone to 
medical school, 4 to law school, 1 to 
architectural school, 9 to schools of social 
work, 19 to schools giving regular courses 
for apprentice teachers. Seventeen have 
studied in the arts. Ten others have 
taken training in library work, nursing, 
laboratory work, personnel work and oc- 
cupational therapy. 

To go back to the four hundred A.B.'s 



and the 250 who have wanted jobs, we 
must add to the 250 many of the 85 now 
taking further training of some kind who 
will probably want jobs later on. We 
think only about 90 of the 400 have not 
had some paid occupation in mind for 
some time or other, but here the unknown 
65 play a very large part and we may 
be thoroughly off. In many cases, too, 
those with no paid occupation are often 
as fully and as usefully occupied as those 
working for pay. 

To recapitulate in answer to some of 
the questions we have been asked: It is 
not true that a large percentage go into 
department stores. Of the 13 who have 
gone, there are only 4 now working and 
3 of these just began this year. It is true 
that a large number take business courses, 
somewhat more than ten per cent of those 
who want or will want paid jobs. It may 
be true that fewer alumnae go into teach- 
ing now than formerly but teachers still 
outnumber those in any other occupation. 
We found the answers interesting our- 
selves and we hope that alumnae with 
other questions will write to us. If we 
can give the information, we shall be 
very glad. 

I am afraid that this all sounds like a 
bank statement. 

Louise Hodges Crenshaw, 1918, 

For the Bureau of Recommendations. 



PUBLIC SERVICE FELLOWSHIP 



HPHIS Fellowship for 1939-1940 should 
■*■ be of interest to all recent women 
graduates of colleges. It offers a sum of 
$1,400 for a year of graduate study at an 
approved college in one or more of the 
related fields of Economics, Government, 
History and Sociology. The award is 
made annually by the faculty of Barnard 
College to a woman having graduated 



during the past five years who shows 
promise of usefulness in the public serv- 
ice (ordinary fields of teaching not in- 
cluded) . 

Requests for further information and 
for application blanks should be addressed 
to Professor Jane Perry Clark, Chairman 
of the Faculty Committee, Barnard Col- 
lege, Columbia University, New York. 



[13] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



UNDERGRADUATE NOTES 

By MARY R. MEIGS, 1939 



THERE has always been a dualism 
at Bryn Mawr between the academic 
and the so-called unacademic. The 
former, the strict liberal arts tradition, is 
the keystone of our prestige; the latter, 
embracing practical and creative work of 
all kinds, has been pushing its way little 
by little into the curriculum, starting long 
ago with Prose Writing and Fiction, then 
with Playwriting, and finally, this year, 
with Public Speaking. 

It is doubtful whether Bryn Mawr will 
let down its barriers and give practical 
art and music classes for credit. It seems 
to be generally agreed that this would 
weaken its position academically. There 
is an awareness, however, of those who 
feel the absence of such courses and who 
welcome lectures and concerts that par- 
tially fill their place. An attempt is being 
made, too, to bring to the College lec- 
turers like Paul Green, who can tell us 
something of the technique of art, so that 
we can try to put it into practice. Mr. 
Green spoke on The Imaginative Theatre 
in America and held two informal con- 
ferences with undergraduates. It was es- 
pecially interesting to talk to someone 
who is an artist through and through, and 
a genuine idealist. We are very much 
aware of the superiority of a small college 
when we have such an opportunity. The 
relative smallness of Goodhart also gives 
us a feeling of intimacy and informality; 
there is none of the usual theatrical dis- 
tance between audience and performers. 
The Trapp Choir, who had the same mod- 
est character of artless artistry as Paul 
Green, seemed to be playing and singing 
with us, and Kreisler's recital was doubly 
wonderful because he was so close to his 
audience. 



An interest in music and art at Bryn 
Mawr has always existed, greater than 
anyone realises, but sometimes over- 
shadowed by academic work. The Art 
Club, which has been alternately strong 
and weak because it has no financial sup- 
port except dues, has more vitality than 
usual this year, and with the help of Mr. 
Sloane of the Art Department is planning 
exhibitions both by undergraduates and 
outside artists. The Choir is composed of 
sixty-seven members who really enjoy 
singing. When Gilbert and Sullivan was 
going to be abandoned early in the fall, 
the Choir was most enthusiastic about a 
serious concert which might involve work 
like that done in presenting the Messiah. 
Moreover, for a long time there have 
been numbers of undergraduate and fac- 
ulty musicians who have practiced faith- 
fully and have co-operated with each 
other; Mr. Alwyne organised a very suc- 
cessful musical group a number of years 
ago. 

We have gone even farther along mu- 
sical lines this year, largely because of the 
coming of Helen Rice, 1923, as Warden 
of Rhoads. Miss Rice, an able musician 
herself, has unearthed much of the mu- 
sical talent in the College — cellists, 
flutists, violinists, violists and pianists — 
and has welded them into a group of 
twenty-two who meet weekly with un- 
flagging enthusiasm, and are planning 
some time to give an informal musicale 
for the college at large. 

The importance of a group of this kind 
is to show that we are not as entirely 
academic as we like to think we are. The 
attitude of those who are playing with 
Miss Rice is one of grateful amazement, 
amazement both because they are finding 



[14] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



such pleasure in musical self-expression, 
and because they actually have time to 
give to it. 

Those of us who are looking forward 
to having the Theatre Workshop feel that 
it would give to art and playwriting the 
same kind of stimulation that Miss Rice 
has given to music; and not only would a 
large body of people appear in answer to 
this stimulation, but they would be sur- 
prised to see how much time they could 
afford to spend on such extra-curricular 
work. 

The lecture by Paul Green on Novem- 
ber 16th was particularly interesting to 
those who believe that practical art should 
have a place in Bryn Mawr. In one of 
the conferences which he held with un- 
dergraduates, Mr. Green asked why we 
did not have an experimental Theatre 
Workshop; he considered creation, by 
those who can create, of paramount mv 
portance. Most artists who come here are 
shocked by our limited output of creative 
work, forgetting, because they are artists, 
the value of the work we are doing. 

Mr. Green also asked for student opin- 
ion about Bryn Mawr, what the students 
believed, and whether they were satisfied 
or dissatisfied with college life. Most of 
our answers reflected the traditional Con- 
fusion of Youth; there was some differ- 
ence of opinion about the meaning of col- 
lege, and a few were openly defiant of 
what they thought was Bryn Mawr's pol- 
icy of creative confinement. As seniors, 
this dissatisfaction tended to make us take 
the opposite tack, and to defend Bryn 
Mawr's academic accomplishment. Side 
by side with the artistic value of Paul 



Green, of the Trapp Choir and Kreisler, 
and of the Entertainment Series to come, 
there is the scholarliness of Judge Florence 
Allen and Dr. Alfred Salmony, and the 
broad social interest of Miss Bondfield, 
Miss Perkins and Miss Wiskemann. We 
are not neglected from any point of view. 

More and more, as a small group, we 
are trying to co-operate with larger 
groups in the United States and all over 
the world. Certainly the interest here in 
national and foreign affairs has lately 
been increasingly keen. The Peace Coun- 
cil, which started last year as a small, 
almost powerless organisation, has grown 
surprisingly, and is now giving concrete 
help to Spanish and Chinese sufferers, and 
sponsored a faculty-student skit for the 
Peace Chest. The skit was called Our 
Village, a free parody of Our Town and 
Bryn Mawr at the same time, and had an 
all-star faculty cast, with a few under- 
graduates. Our Village is really an off- 
shoot of Alice in VJonderland, which was 
originally planned, but which involved 
too many difficulties of staging and cos- 
tuming. Our only regret is that Miss 
Terrien could not play the part of Alice 
as originally planned. 

We are especially proud that Bryn 
Mawr was among the first to offer schol- 
arships to German refugees: the grad- 
uate is already here and that two under- 
graduates are coming as soon as can- 
didates who meet our academic require- 
ments can be selected. In every direction 
an effort is being made to supplement res- 
olutions by action, and to strengthen 
moral indignation with practical demo- 
cratic and humanitarian measures. 



Grateful acknowledgment is here made for the 1921, 1929, 1930 and 1936 
Class Year Books which have been sent to the Alumnae Office. Those of 1910 
and 1925 have been promised. President Park's collection is now complete but 
the Alumnae Office still needs those of 1907, 1916, 1918, 1919, 1920. 



[IT] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



COLLEGE MOVING PICTURES 



ALUMNAE will be interested to hear 
that plans for producing a motion 
picture of the Bryn Mawr campus 
and student life at the College are defi- 
nitely under way. The need for such a 
picture has long been felt by the College, 
by the students, and by the alumnae. The 
sessions of the last meeting of the Alum- 
nae Council, particularly, revealed the 
strong desire of the alumnae that better 
pictures should be made of the College, 
not only for use with alumnae groups 
everywhere, but also with prospective 
students and their parents and larger 
school groups. 

After careful study of many proposals 
it has been decided to have an all- color 
film of about 700 feet in length on stand- 
ard 16 mm. film. The field has been 
widely canvassed to find a firm which will 
produce the best possible film along the 
lines the College desires at a cost that is 
not prohibitive. Early in December the 
contract was signed for the work to be 
done by the National Bureau of Private 
Schools, an organisation which has done 
similar work not only for hundreds of 
private schools all over the country, but 
has also produced films for Wilson Col' 
lege and Rutgers University, in addition 
to helping with the production of a 
Vassar film which is just being completed. 
A representative of the company came to 



the College and showed samples of vari- 
ous kinds of pictures and met with a 
group of the people at the College who 
will have much to do with the execution 
of the movie. Two undergraduates were 
included in this group, for the College 
feels that the advice and assistance of the 
student body is essential in the produc- 
tion of a picture which is to represent 
Bryn Mawr accurately. The alumnae sec- 
retary was also present, and will continue 
to advise us about probable alumnae de- 
sires in the matter of presenting the Col- 
lege to the world. 

A scenario is now being written by pro- 
fessionals connected with the National 
Bureau in co-operation with college offi- 
cials from material given them as a basis 
of action. The scenario will be presented 
to the College shortly for review and al- 
teration and final approval. It is hoped 
that the first "shots 11 can be taken in Jan- 
uary, and that some of the film may be in 
shape to show at the Council meeting in 
March, so that alumnae may have the op- 
portunity of giving further advice about 
the film. The film will cover all four sea- 
sons at Bryn Mawr and will take in as 
many sides of the life at College as is 
consistent with making a well-rounded 
picture, with continuity and pictorial 
excellence. 

Barbara L. Cary, 1936, 

Publicity Secretary. 



DEANERY NOTES 



TWO lectures of an interesting and 
unusual nature were given this 
month at the Deanery by Dr. 
Alfred Salmony. On November 2nd, Dr. 
Salmony's subject was Chinese Bronzes, 
and on November 30th, Chinese Jades. 
Afterwards a most delightful party was 



given in his honour by the Chinese 
Scholarship Committee. About a hun- 
dred and fifty people were present, and 
made the evening a most successful one. 
On November 3rd was held the semi- 
annual meeting of the Committee on the 
Economic and Legal Status of Women, 



[16] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



of the American Association of Univer- 
sity Women, under the chairmanship of 
Dr. Kingsbury. We were especially glad 
of this opportunity of continuing the tra- 
dition of the Deanery, and look forward 
to future meetings of the Committee. 

Several improvements have taken place 
in the Deanery furnishings, which, though 
small, are extremely noticeable. Many of 
the sofa cushions have been re-covered, 
and at least six chairs repaired and re- 
upholstered. The big swing has been 
done over, too, in a soft shade of red, 
and lights up the end of the room where 
it is hung. 

The Deanery rooms are now almost 
all taken, and business is most active, with 



luncheon parties and dinners being given 
frequently. The latter include the din- 
ners before the Salmony lecture, and 
before the Kreisler concert in Goodhart 
Hall on December 1st. 

The seniors, whose Deanery privileges 
now extend through the whole year, seem 
to enjoy the Deanery for tea almost daily 
during the week, and over the week-end 
entertain their escorts there. They also 
find it a convenient place for their men 
visitors to spend the night. Needless to 
say, we enjoy having the seniors at the 
Deanery, and they, in turn, seem to real- 
ise and appreciate the nature of the 
privilege which has been offered to them. 
D. G. F., 1932. 



THE NEW YORK BRYN MAWR CLUB 

PENTHOUSE— HOTEL BARCLAY, LEXINGTON AVE. AND 48TH ST. 



ON December eighth a housewarm- 
ing tea opened the New York 
Bryn Mawr Club, and, as far as 
we can see, the new club, located atop 
the Barclay, is going to be all things to all 
people — like Maya or Hertha or the Red 
Cross. As a starting place or ending 
place or stopping-off place it fills every 
need. It seems to be the perfect center 
for shoppers, theatre-goers and friends 
who meet with half-hour margins. If you 
want to stay overnight, if you want your 
mail or telephone messages kept straight, 
if you long for a good lunch ($.65 up) 
or dinner ($.95 up) in the Bryn Mawr- 
Wellesley dining-room, all can be ar- 
ranged. If you crave tea on a terrace 
with New York at your feet, you can 
have that, too, — better try the club lounge 
till spring, however. In any season, cock- 
tails can come right up to you, with no 
room service charge, and more intriguing 
still, they may be signed for down in the 
Barclay Bar, which is one of the most at- 
tractive in town. We should call this a 

[ 



boon to the lady who dislikes strangling 
her friends in order to pay the check. 

The club itself is ready to indulge your 
every whim from squash (eaten or 
played) to books — and you may have 
heard that it has a distinguished library. 

The opening tea was a great success, 
and we do hope that all our fellow-Bryn 
Martrys will come back often to make 
our rooms as useful and interesting as 
they are comfortable. E. M. C, 1925. 

Board of Governors, 1938-39 

President, Florence Craig Whitney, 
1905 (Mrs. Arthur E. Whitney). 

Vice-President, Mary Tongue Eber- 
stadt, 1913 (Mrs. Ferdinand Eberstadt). 

Treasurer, Eleanor Hess Kurzman, 
1926 (Mrs. Harold P. Kursman). 

Assistant Treasurer, Margaret C. 
Timpson, 1918. 

Secretary, Helen Converse Thorpe, 
1901 (Mrs. Warren P. Thorpe). 

Assistant Secretary, Helen Richter 
Elser, 1913 (Mrs. Maximilian Elser). 

17] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



THE ALUMNAE BOOKSHELF 



THE SCARLET OAK. By Cornelia 
Meigs. 198 pp. The Macmillan Co. 
New York, 1938. $2.00. 

THE appearance of a new book by 
Cornelia Meigs promises delight for 
all her friends, old and young. The 
Scarlet Oa\, most recent of her long list 
of titles, will strengthen her growing 
reputation as one of the best-loved writers 
for today's children. It is the type of 
story she handles most skillfully — the re 
creation of an incident, a period of his- 
tory, so that it comes alive in terms that 
will most interest a child. The period is 
that of the youth of the American Re- 
public, the years immediately following 
the War of 1812; the scene shifts be- 
tween Bordentown, north of Philadelphia 
on the Jersey side of the Delaware River, 
and Philadelphia itself. The incident 
concerns Mr. Bonaparte, brother of the 
exiled Napoleon, who has built a luxuri- 
ous mansion near Bordentown; certain 
valuable papers in Mr. Bonaparte's pos- 
session; Hugh Armond, twelve-year-old 
hero of the adventure, and his elder 
brother Jeremy; Stephen Girard, mariner 
and merchant of Philadelphia. 

The story opens with the arrival of 
Hugh and Jeremy from France in 1817. 
At Bordentown they find their grand- 
father in financial difficulties: his ships 
are unjustly impounded in Danish har- 
bors. At kindly, shrewd Stephen Girard's 
suggestion, Jeremy goes to Denmark as 
his grandfather's agent, while Hugh be- 
comes the gardener's boy at Point Breeze, 
Mr. Bonaparte's estate. A strange and 
desperate young man, Mr. Dominic, 
crosses Hugh's path several times as he 
works in the garden or rests under the 
scarlet oak tree that overlooks the twist- 
ing Delaware. Jeremy's long-awaited re- 
turn from his successful mission and the 



fate of Mr. Bonaparte's fine house com- 
bine in an exciting climax, which solves 
also the mystery of Mr. Dominic and the 
final destination of the damaging papers 
with which he was concerned. Hugh and 
Jeremy, re-united, look forward to a 
bright future. 

With the pattern of the story's events 
are woven other threads. Miss Meigs has 
an unusual feeling for the beauty in 
nature that a child will appreciate: the 
tracks of a mouse in the snow, bright 
vegetables in the stalls on Market Street, 
the spring landscape Hugh sees from the 
great oak. This affection for lovely sights 
and sounds makes a warm, rich back- 
ground for her well-drawn characters. 
Mr. Bonaparte becomes very much of a 
person when we see him going out in the 
snow to release the rabbits from their 
traps. Stephen Girard seems doubly real 
when we meet him with his market bas- 
ket or riding out to look for a farm on 
which to grow new fruits and vines. 
Hugh himself is aware of the delights of 
making things grow. 

Like all good stories The Scarlet Oa\ 
has a moral, not tacked on as an after- 
thought, nor yet too sharply pointed, but 
there all the same. Miss Meigs under- 
stands very well the importance of our 
American traditions. She contrasts the 
houses of William Penn, George Wash- 
ington and Mr. Bonaparte as symbols of 
the things these men stood for — the two 
Americans for lasting freedom in speech 
and faith, the Frenchman for power and 
selfish glory; honest simplicity against 
empty greatness. In the words that she 
has Stephen Girard speak: "William 
Penn can never be forgotten, as long as 
men love liberty. And people talk of 
George Washington as though he had 
walked the streets of Philadelphia only 
yesterday. All men will talk of Napoleon, 

[18] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



but they will not speak of him as they 
speak of these. . . . When I think of 
American liberties I think of American 
oak trees. . . . The kind that grow in 
our soil grow nowhere else in the world. 11 
The lesson is a good one, for ourselves 
as well as our children. 

Elizabeth Kent Tarshis, 1935. 

THE PRESBYTERIAN CONGREGA- 
TION OF HAZLETON: A HIS- 
TORY OF THE FIRST HUNDRED 
YEARS. By Gladys Jones Mar\le. 
Privately printed. 

STUDENTS of American history, 
particularly those who realize the 
importance of the preservation of 
local records, will be interested in Mrs. 
Markle's book, The Presbyterian Congre- 
gation of Hazleton: A History of the 
First Hundred Tears. The editor, in ex- 
plaining how the work came to be under- 
taken, points out that it was not until 
1915 that residents of Pennsylvania were 
required by law to report vital statistics. 
Such church records of births, marriages 
and deaths as survive are, therefore, of 
real importance and Mrs. Markle's care- 
ful work insures the preservation of the 
records of the Presbyterian church of one 
community. The original of these records 
are in six volumes. They are not always 
complete and some of them are inde- 
cipherable. Mrs. Markle says that there- 
fore "in a few cases, certain additions 
and corrections have been made through 
reference to family Bibles, descendants, 
and other primary sources, always aim- 
ing at exactitude." The value of these 
additions for the scholar would have been 
enhanced if the editor had indicated the 
precise nature of these addenda in foot- 
notes. The book is evidently the result 
of meticulous research and succeeds in 

[19 



being interesting to the lay reader as well 
as to the student of history. 

Josephine Fisher, 1922 
Lecturer in History at Bryn Mawr. 

WISDOM'S GATE. By Margaret Ayer 
Barnes. 370 pp. Boston: Houghton 
Mifflin Company. $2.50. 



"W* 



SDOM'S GATE" carries 

through to the fortunes of the 

younger generation, old friends 

whom Mrs. Barnes introduced in Tears 

of Grace. The title of the book is taken 

from a verse from "Paradise Lost 11 : 

Suspicion sleeps 

At Wisdom's gate, and to Simplicity 

Resigns her charge. 

In the time and place in which the 
lives of these Carvers and Bridges and 
Lancasters were laid, the mechanism 
through which both suspicion and sim- 
plicity operated was divorce. 

The older generation had had "beaux 11 
and whispered scandals and an occasional 
suicide. The younger found more direct 
ways to cope with mutable emotions. To 
them it seemed only honest and decent 
to adjust to changing loves by changing 
marital partners. To their elders, straight- 
forward speaking, let alone action, on 
such matters seemed indecent. Cicely 
Carver's course was a peculiarly vexatious 
example, since it tangled so many family 
relationships that it could neither be dis- 
missed nor overlooked. Cicely's first hus- 
band, Jack Bridges, was her first cousin; 
her second, Albert Lancaster, had been 
the husband of Jack's sister. 

When Cicely and Albert returned 
from China, at a sudden intermission in 
his diplomatic career, they had about as 
much chance for privacy as the proverbial 
goldfish. The Chicago suburb to which 
they came back was ringed around with 
the joint relatives and old friends and 

] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



cluttered with memories of their previous 
marriages. Many eyes, not all of them 
kind or friendly, were turned on them in 
an effort to see if pretty blond Cicely 
would be more successful than her cousin 
had been in keeping the too-charming 
Albert in line. 

Wisdom's Gate is a swiftly moving 
story of family life with the warmth and 
vigor to which Mrs. Barnes 1 readers 
look forward. It is peopled with a score 
of clear-cut characters — men and women 
whom one might have known in any 
comfortably upper-class suburban setting. 
In the years of the story, depression had 
brought a slight but not too distressing 
financial stringency. When Cicely went 
back to the French farmhouse her father 
had given her at the time of her first 
marriage, she could not do it over as 
completely as she would have liked to 
efface memories of Jack, and she had to 
get along with one servant instead of 
three. Albert, who needed an independ- 
ent income to pursue his career in the 
diplomatic service, had to take what of- 
fered, a berth in his stepfather's adver- 
tising office. Cicely's problem was three- 
fold, to live gracefully on reduced means, 
to hold up her head in the presence of 
disapproving relatives and before her and 
Jack's children, and to live with Albert. 
Of the three, the last was by all means 
the most important. 

Albert's looks had branded him as a 
sissy when he -was a child. As an adult, 
they made him a not too unwilling quarry 
of women. He could no more help being 
nice to a pretty woman than he could 
help being handsome. Cicely never 
doubted that she loved him, though at 
times she wished fervently that she didn't. 
Nor did Albert doubt his love for her; 
the trouble was only that he sometimes 
took it for granted and that he did not 
feel it conflicted with occasional interest 



in other women. The question on which 
their marriage finally hung perilously was 
whether, loving him, Cicely could accept 
Albert as he was. 

Mrs. Barnes does not point a moral in 
Cicely's story, though doubtless some of 
her readers will use the book as an argu- 
ment for or against divorce; either point 
might be dragged out of it by a selection 
of episodes and characters. The view to 
which wisdom's gate leads is, rather, that 
adults must be prepared to take the con- 
sequences of their emotions, and that 
those consequences, willy-nilly, involve 
other persons. Divorce has given a new 
turn to old dilemmas and makes possible, 
as in this tangled family, new and dis- 
tressing or amusing situations. On the 
evidence of this story, it would be hard 
to argue that the directness and straight- 
speaking of the younger generation was 
more destructive than the silence of the 
older. Wisdom's Gate gives in a highly 
readable novel a series of questions which 
will probably be no less pertinent in 
A. D. 2000. 

Mary Ross 
New York Herald-Tribune Boo\s. 

THE BOOK OF HUGH AND 

NANCY. By Eric Milner-White and 
Eleanor S. Duc\ett. Macmillan. $2.00. 

THIS story is written supposedly by 
an eleven-year-old boy and his twin 
sister — actually by Canon Milner- 
White, a Fellow at King's College, Cam- 
bridge, and Eleanor S. Duckett (Bryn 
Mawr, Ph.D. 1914), English born but at 
present professor of classical languages at 
Smith College. The picture, therefore, 
that these distinguished authors give us 
of Hugh's school experiences in England 
and his sister's in New England must be 
accepted as authentic. 

The average American child will find 

[20] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Hugh a snob of the first water, though 
Nancy cannot fail to endear herself to the 
reader by her cheerful adaptability and 
sense of fun. One wonders how she could 
be Hugh's twin sister. 

Grown-ups, especially those who are 
acquainted with the English Public School 
system or those who will take the trouble 
to read Mary Ellen Chase's interesting 
foreword to the book (which is an apolo- 
gia for Hugh in the light of his birthright 
to the "School of aristocratic heritage") 
will undoubtedly be more tolerant of the 
little boy. They will be interested in the 
national contrasts and only sorry that they 
are not given more details of the educa- 
tional systems. 

Some grown-ups, too, may be sorry that 
the characters in the story who surround 
these two children run quite so true to 
pattern, that they are drawn in plain 
black and white with no half tones, and 
act always as one would expect them to: 
the stupid, stingy aunt in London who 
has her husband cowed and whose over- 
worked cockney maid is the only solace 
in Hugh's life there; the highly educated 
New England professional old maid (the 
aunt who takes Nancy in after her par- 
ents' death) who has eyes "as cold as a 
codfish," hates dogs and noise, but who, 
like the proverbial hard-hearted old lady 
in the movies, is soon softened and re- 
juvenated by the presence of her little 
niece. The one warm and real adult char- 
acter in the book is the Dean of King's 
College, who has a light touch and great 
wisdom with the young. Hugh tells Nancy 
that he is "lovely," but we found him 
more than that. 

Some of the descriptions, both of Cam- 
bridge and of Northampton, are mem- 
orable. They bring on a kind of nostalgia 
for quiet cathedral naves and for hedge' 
rows, or for early spring near the Mo- 
hawk Trail. And many of the situations 



in which the children find themselves are 
touching. The plan of the book — a diary 
kept by the twins for each other on the 
two sides of the Atlantic — is a clever one, 
and a grown-up at least follows them 
through their year of vicissitudes with 
interest. 

Lois Kellog Jessup, 1920. 

SEVENTY STORIES OF THE OLD 

TESTAMENT. Illustrated with Re- 
productions from Works of Master 
Woodcut Artists of the Fifteenth and 
Sixteenth Centuries. Compiled by 
Helen Slocum Estabroo\. Portland, 
Maine. The Bradford Press, 1938. 
$3.75. 

THERE could be no better proof of 
the charm of this book than its 
effect upon the little group of fac- 
ulty gathered in the Deanery for coffee 
on the morning the Editor of the Bul- 
letin handed the book to the reviewer. 
In no time the heated discussion of pen- 
sion schemes melted into delighted mur- 
murs over the Snow- White-like animals 
in the background of the Temptation, the 
benign family group of lions around 
Daniel, and the expression of intense re- 
lief on the jaws of the whale as Jonah 
is deposited on land. 

Mrs. Estabrook, the introduction tells 
us, had collected Bible pictures for her 
children, had told them the stories in her 
own words, but had found no simplified 
version that satisfied her, and decided to 
make one. The illustrations are the pic- 
tures her children liked best, the wood- 
cuts of fifteenth and sixteenth century 
artists (drawn largely from Bibles in the 
New York Public Library and the Met- 
ropolitan Museum); the text is that of 
the King James version, only shortened 
into "a form brief enough for little 
heads." The book, finished shortly before 
Mrs. Estabrook's death, is published by 



[«] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



her family for the benefit of other chil- 
dren and parents. 

The illustrations can hardly fail to 
draw children irresistibly to the great 
words of the text. I suspect they will like 
best of all some of the earlier and more 
naive woodcuts, such as the one of the 
Flood, with the Ark navigating danger- 
ously among half-submerged turrets and 
spires, while the passengers, man and 
beast alike, gape at a charming mermaid 
combing her long hair. Older readers 
will perhaps linger longest over the large 
number of cuts by Holbein the younger, 
and the sad- eyed angel of the Durer 
Expulsion from Paradise. 

Text and illustrations, both beautifully 
presented, combine to make a book of 
Bible stories that should delight many 
generations of readers. A lover of the 
Bible and of children could have left no 
happier legacy. 

Margaret Gilman, 1919, 
Associate Professor of French. 

OPENING THE OLD TESTAMENT, 
Written to Be Completed by the 
Reader, by Margaret Dulles Edwards. 



Charles Scribner's Sons. New York, 
1938. 

AS the title implies, this book fur- 
A"\ nishes an ingenious method of mak- 
ing the Old Testament graphic to 
children of Junior High School age. In 
addition to the familiar exercise in which 
the pupil supplies missing information, he 
composes Cyrus's proclamation, Johanan's 
letter and Nehemiah's diary. He is offered 
the opportunity to turn artist as he illus- 
trates the life of Abraham, architect as 
he completes the plan for Solomon's tem- 
ple, playwright as he dramatizes the lives 
of Joseph and Saul. 

The writer thus defines her end: "To 
provide a means of sharing the experi- 
ences and aspirations of the Old Testa- 
ment people; the gathering of informa- 
tion and the obtaining of correct answers 
is of secondary importance.'" 

Certainly the means should prove not 
only entertaining but stimulating to any 
class because of the unusually wide range 
of appeal. Whether the end is too much 
sacrificed to this experience must be de- 
termined. 

Pamela Burr, 1928. 



HELEN N. TUTTLE, 1928, EXHIBITS AT 
BRYN MAWR ART CENTER 



ON Tuesday, December 6th, an exhi- 
bition of Paintings in Egg Tempera 
and Water Color by Helen N. Tuttle, 
1928, was opened at the Bryn Mawr Art 
Center with a Private Viewing. The crit- 
icism of the show said: 

"Miss Tuttle . . . chooses two of the 
most difficult of media and shows a mas- 
tery of each. In each she has developed 
an interesting and individual style. 

"The water colors are direct and freely 



painted, and range from studies of Maine 
hills in the fog to decorative studies of 
intimate corners of woodland. In each 
type of work she catches the elusive sense 
of Nature which lends real enchantment 
and mystery to the work. 

"In the temperas, we see highly organ- 
ised paintings with a fine sense of imagi- 
nation and rhythmic organization. These 
range from large paintings of plant forms 
to portraits and Maine harbour scenes. 



[22] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



LETTER FROM AN ALUMNA 

FROM FRANCES F. JONES, 1934, ELLA RIEGEL FELLOW IN CLASSICAL 
ARCHAEOLOGY AT THE AMERICAN SCHOOL IN ATHENS 



U"\ "\7 7 HERE, oh where, to begin — 
^A/ but I suppose, as always, the 
beginning is best, so we start 
with Tarsus in the heat of July, trying 
to finish before we left. I finally tied up 
the last bag of pottery, though I was 
delayed for a couple of days by what I 
found out later to be a sort of incipient 
malaria. I went down to Syria and had 
a grand time visiting Baalbek and Pal- 
myra. Baalbek is a compact and well 
preserved set of Roman ruins, a superb 
sight from my hotel window with the 
purple-brown Lebanon behind with a bit 
of snow still on top and the bright blue 
sky. And Palmyra is magnificent — a 
great expanse of colonnaded streets, tem- 
ples and tombs rising up out of the desert 
sands. The coloring of the place is un- 
forgettable, especially in the warm glow 
of the setting sun; Biblical pictures of 
brownish mountains and bright blue sky 
always seemed a bit unreal but there they 
are in three dimensions, the mountains 
worn and rugged and bare with purple 
shadows emphasising the outlines, the 
brownish-yellow sands and the deep blue 
overhead. The stones and columns at 
Palmyra are almost desert color, warm 
and yellowed, and pock-marked from the 
action of the blowing sand. The desert 
wind is constantly weeping around the 
ruins and at dusk it is one of the most 
eerie places to be in; the empty tombs 
stand silent on the hillside, no living crea- 
ture is visible save a bat or an owl flying 
about the ruins and the wind blows stead- 
ily. It gave me the creeps! 

"We spent a day or two in Northern 
Syria visiting one or two excavations. 
That northwest section is on the verge 
of becoming Turkey, if it hasn't already, 

c 



and special permission is required to go 
there but we had no difficulty getting our 
papers and going in to see Antioch. The 
American excavations there have been 
packing up their things fast and getting 
them south so they won't fall in the hands 
of the Turks, but the share of the spoils 
that belong to Antioch itself is still there 
and we were able to see a lot of the ex- 
citing Roman mosaics they have found 
there and I managed to see some of the 
Hellenistic and Roman pottery which is 
very closely related to the stuff I'm work- 
ing on at Tarsus. We spent the night 
with a small dig that the Oriental Insti- 
tute at Chicago has near Antioch. 

"Then we began our grand tour of 
Iraq, which turned out to be a great suc- 
cess. We went the entire length of the 
country in a car we hired and even took 
a short detour down to Kuwait on the 
Persian Gulf; we pride ourselves in hav- 
ing done a pretty thorough job of the 
sightseeing and there were only a few 
places we weren't able to reach. Some 
of the sites we visited were rather dis- 
appointing because the excavations were 
old and had become sanded in and weath- 
ered, but others were even more exciting 
than we had expected. Babylon is mag- 
nificent with its lofty towers decorated 
with rows of marching lions, bulls and 
dragons, and Ur is very spectacular too. 
Often we took a great deal of trouble to 
get to a place that was scarcely worth the 
effort (the importance of archaeological 
finds from a place isn't always in propor- 
tion to the amount there is to see on the 
mound itself) , but there was usually some 
compensation. We had to go on horse- 
back to one site and neither Ann (Ann 
Hoskin Ehrich, Bryn Mawr, 1930— Ed.) 

23] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



nor I were prepared for the jaunt in the 
way of clothing; I doubt if that Arab 
village ever saw so much feminine thigh 
in their lives; we rode most of the time 
with one hand and used the other to hold 
down our skirts. The horses have halters 
instead of the usual set of reins, so we 
were a bit baffled at first in steering the 
beasts; in fact, Ann was spilled and rather 
badly scraped when we first started off. 
The mound was completely disappointing 
and we came back to the sheikh who had 
lent us the horses; he gave us tea and 
water for refreshment and had his own 
doctor waiting to take care of Ann's 
scrapes. The doctor didn't seem to be a 
full-fledged one but was supposed to be 
expert in treating bullet and knife 
wounds! He had Ann most impressively 
bound up. There was one whole day we 
spent on a wild goose chase to a mound 
that turned out to have the same name 
as the one we really wanted to see, but 
we had a delightful visit at the local 
sheikh's house that quite offset our dis- 
appointment. They entertained us and 
fed us constantly, the sheikh sitting by 
with his retinue of strapping followers, 
and gave us a large room in which to 
take our siesta and basins of water in 
which to wash our feet! (Good Biblical 
traditions all about.) Later Ann and I 
went over to the harem to visit the wives 
and women; the sheikh went with us and 
introduced us first to his really beautiful 
first wife and then to his not-so-attractive 
second wife, who always hung in the 
background. Each woman was attended 
by a serving woman, a negress who also 
acted as nursemaid for the babies. After 
the sheikh left, the other women poured 
into the room and had a grand time look- 
ing at us; they thought we were pretty 



funny. They were entertaining to us, too, 
swathed in their rusty black clothes from 
head to foot, blue tattooing on their faces 
and hands, rings in their noses, anklets 
on their legs. One of them danced for 
us, a young monkey of a thing, and was 
considered screamingly funny. 

"Kuwait is a fascinating walled town 
on the shores of the Persian Gulf and the 
center for pearl fishing. The great brown 
boats go out to sea for several months 
and come back with their season's catch 
of pearls which are sent to the markets 
in the East and in the West. There are 
no hotels in Kuwait, which is quite off 
the beaten track, so we stayed with the 
American Medical Mission, which has a 
hospital there. The town spreads out 
over a large area so we really needed a 
car to take us along the broad, neat 
streets, which are lined on either side by 
mud brick houses. One of the most in- 
teresting things we did was to go on an 
Arab picnic, just Ann and I, since it was 
only for women. We spread out a rug 
on the beach and the food was served 
on platters — roast chicken, rice dripping 
with gravy, meat balls, pickled apples, 
watermelon. A la Arab, we ate with 
our hands — right hand only, as one never 
touches food with the left hand, which 
implies that it is unclean. 

"From Iraq we went back to Syria and 
landed in Damascus, a place which is 
death on pocketbooks. What with rugs 
and brocades and metal work, you go 
wild. We passed several fascinating hours 
in the bazaars and then finally fled from 
town to avoid further temptation. Much 
as I wanted to be back in Athens, I didn't 
realise how fond I was of the place until 
I got here and now that I'm here I can 
scarcely bear to think of leaving." 



[24] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



CLASS NOTES 



Letters sent to a Class Collector, care of the Alumnae Office, 
will be promptly forwarded. 






DOCTORS OF PHILOSOPHY 

MASTERS OF ART 

FORMER GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Editor: Vesta M. Sonne 
Radnor Hall 
Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Class Collector for Doctors of Philosophy: 
Marion R. Stoll 

Class Collector for Masters of Art and 
Graduate Students: 
Helen Lowengrund Jacoby 
(Mrs. George Jacoby) 

1889 
Class Editor: Sophia Weygandt Harris 

(Mrs. John McA. Harris) 

105 W. Walnut Lane, Germantown, Pa. 
Class Collector: Martha G. Thomas 

1890 
No Editor Appointed 
Class Collector: Elizabeth Harris Keiser 
(Mrs. Edward H. Keiser) 

1891 

No Editor Appointed 
Class Collector: Lilian Sampson Morgan 
(Mrs. T. H. Morgan) 

1892 

Class Editor and Class Collector: 

Edith Wetherill Ives (Mrs. F. M. Ives) 
28 East 70th Street, New York, N. Y. 

1893 

Class Editor: Susan Walker FitzGerald 
(Mrs. Richard Y. FitzGerald) 
7 Greenough Ave., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Class Collector: Elizabeth Nichols Moores 
(Mrs. Charles W. Moores) 

1894 

Class Editor and Class Collector: 
Abby Brayton Durfee 
(Mrs. Randall N. Durfee) 
19 Highland Ave., Fall River, Mass. 

Your Editor and Class Secretary was happy 
to greet Fay McCracken Stockwell, Marie 
Minor, and Anna West West at the Alumnae 
Week-end in October. We had a fine time 
together and only wish there were more 1894's 
who could have enjoyed Lantern Night, the 
new Rhoads Hall, the Science Building, and 
the beloved Taylor, Merion and Radnor Halls. 

The only sadness came from the news of 



Margaretta MacVeagh Smith's death that pre- 
vious week. 

In July Helen Middleton Smith wrote of 
her husband's death. Dr. Smith had resigned 
from the Massachusetts Institute of Technol- 
ogy and they were living in Kennebunkport, 
Maine. To Helen the Class extends its sym- 
pathy. 

Your Class Editor and Collector is eager 
to hear from many more of our Class. 

1895 
Class Editor: Susan Fowler 

420 W. 118th St., New York City 
Class Collector: Elizabeth Bent Clark 

(Mrs. Herbert Lincoln Clark) 

1896 

Class Editor: Abigail Camp Dimon 

1411 Genesee St., Utica, New York 
Class Collector: Ruth Furness Porter 
(Mrs. James F. Porter) 

We .all sympathize with Mary Crawford 
Dudley in the death of her sister Bessie, which 
occurred suddenly in July at their summer 
home in Les Eboulements, Canada. 

On September 12th, when Mary was plan- 
ning to return home, she slipped on a rug 
and had a bad fall so that it was October 24th 
before she could travel. She is now in Bryn 
Mawr at the Deanery, having rented her 
house on the Gulph Road, and she is recover- 
ing nicely. 

Lydia Boring and Hilda Justice have sent 
the Class Editor the following letters, full of 
interest, about their recent doings. Would 
that many others of the Class would follow 
their examples. 

Lydia writes: "Since retiring from teaching 
in 1936, I have found life in New York City 
full of a number of interesting things, and 
have spent nearly six months of each year 
abroad. This year we sailed in March just 
after the Anschluss, spending the month of 
April in Italy. In May we drove a small 
French car from Normandy to Toulouse and 
back again in pursuit of Romanesque 
churches, finding a very lovely country at that 
season, full of apple blossoms and the pink 
horse chestnuts. In June we were in London, 
where we found people and papers speaking 
of the danger of air raids. For two weeks 
we travelled through Germany on our way to 
Istanbul, talking with those who would talk, 
reading the papers, and finally visiting the 
Friends' Centre in Vienna for several days. 
To our disappointment, Emma Cadbury was 



[25T] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



on her vacation — a well-earned one — but we 
heard much from her friends of the sad plight 
of the non-Aryans whom the Friends were 
trying to help to emigrate. Aryan shops were 
so labelled, and placards on the streets urged 
you to buy the special number of Julius 
Streicher's paper, Der Stiirmer, filled with 
propaganda against the Austrian Jews. Vienna 
was a sad city. 

"In Salonica, in Greece, we visited the 
American Farm School, where a practical 
training in farming is being given the boys 
of the Greek and Macedonian refugee villages. 
These are the Greeks who were repatriated 
from Turkey after the new Turkish govern' 
ment was set up under Kemal Ataturk. Mrs. 
House, the wife of the Farm School director, 
drove us to some of the homes in these Mace 
donian villages, where she was interviewing 
boys who were candidates for the scholarships 
given by English Quakers. In these mud- 
brick houses we were treated with the greatest 
hospitality, and before any questions were put 
to a boy, we had to eat a Turkish sweet or 
drink Turkish coffee. This was quite a dif- 
ferent picture from the one I had had — of 
Macedonia as a centre of violence and revo- 
lution. 

"An extremely interesting month was spent 
in Istanbul, where we had the privilege of 
being shown the work of uncovering the mo- 
saics in Santa Sophia by Mr. Whittemore him- 
self. We also saw Ankara, the new capital, 
built on the Anatolian plateau beside the old 
city of Angora. You travel through a land 
that resembles Palestine, where were the Bibli- 
cal threshing floors, for it was harvest time, 
and come upon this amazing city, wholly of 
functional architecture. There is an up-to-date 
hotel, a water-works and dam that supplies 
good water, modern paving and lighting, and 
an auto road under construction from the 
coast to Ankara. It was typical of the aston- 
ishing work of Kemal Ataturk and of a Turkey 
that has been reborn since it nearly disap- 
peared after the World War. One hopes that 
Ataturk's death will not stop Turkey's progress 
toward becoming a modern nation. 

"I find that I have written much more than 
I meant to. It was all such an interesting 
trip that I forget myself when I begin to talk 
about it! It seems to me I remember some 
one's saying in our column recently that one 
does not do interesting things after one is 
sixty? I am finding it quite the opposite." 

And Hilda: "Early in August I settled 
Miss Ant? in Westhampton Beach, Long 
Island, and I went for a week to Miss 
Ketcham's before she and I set forth for Jasper. 
We had a week at Maligne Lake (very grand, 
very cold!) and a few days at Jasper, before 



joining two others, collecting guides, cook and 
two canoes, and starting a five hundred mile 
canoe trip down the little rivers that form the 
Peace. It was part of Sir Alexander Macken- 
zie's 1793 route and would have fetched us 
up at Aklavik eventually but we found the 
Peace far enough when we came near the 
railroad at the tiny town of Peace River, and 
got back to Edmonton, where after a 'wash 
and brush-up' we caught the train for Mon- 
treal. We were very comfortable in little tents, 
had our air mattresses and bed rolls, very good 
food, and for the fishermen, good trout fish- 
ing. The canoes were 22' by 5' and had both 
paddles and outboard motors." 

Elizabeth Kirkbride was occupying her cot- 
tage at Keene Valley, New York, with her 
maid and the cat, when the storm of Septem- 
ber 21st struck it. The cottage is on the bank 
of a mountain stream, which overflowed, car- 
rying down cobble-stones and boulders, which 
ground around the house with a sound like 
thunder. Water rose to the porch level, but 
fortunately missed the interior of the house 
by an inch or two. When the storm subsided 
they were surrounded by a desert of sand and 
rocks and their mountain road was washed out. 

Elsa Bowman in New London, New Hamp- 
shire, is also said to have suffered from the 
storm, losing a number of trees on her 
property. 

Leonie Gilmour Noguchi's son, Isamu, was 
the winner of the thousand-dollar first prize 
in the national competition for the design of 
a large bronze panel for the main entrance 
of the new Associated Press building in Rocke- 
feller Center. The press account states that he 
submitted two sketch models in the competi- 
tion. On one he worked two months, on the 
other three days. It was the latter that won 
the prize, a design of five men moulded into 
close unity in high relief. 

1897 

Class Editor: Friedrika Heyl 
104 Lake Shore Drive, East 
Dunkirk, N. Y. 

Class Collector: Sue Avis Blake 

As the Bulletin goes to press, word has 
come of the death of Edith Edwards at Woon- 
socket, Rhode Island, on November 26th. 

The following "quotes" are from postcards 
written by our Class President at Avalon 
Orchard, Hood River Valley, Parkdale, Oregon: 

November 12th: "I am writing to Sue 
Blake to ask her if she will serve as Class 
Collector. She sent me a fine report of the 
Collectors' meeting on October 21st, at which 
she represented the Class. If she does not 
accept, what shall I do?" 



[26] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 






November 22nd: "Sue Blake will be Class 
Collector and I am delighted. Will you please 
see that her name appears in the next issue 
of the Bulletin? And will you please write 
a nice little 'item 1 about Sue's new task for 
the Class?" 

A tisket, a tasket — How ever could she ask it? 
Write a "nice little item" about the task of 
collecting for the Class! How can I, when I 
consider it the meanest job going? However, 
it is very pleasant to write about Sue and her 
fine spirit in accepting the office and her pre- 
paredness for doing the work. Any one who 
is capable of teaching college physics one 
semester, and college mathematics the second, 
as she did last year at Wilson College, should 
be able to swing the financial end. Then, too, 
she is good at asking for others and she likes to 
write letters, so be prepared to zip open your 
purses. Since Sue is one of the youngest, or 
least elderly, members of the Class and comes 
of a long-lived family (one of her aunts in 
Boston celebrated her one hundredth birthday 
this summer) we shall not need to worry for 
some years to come about filling the position 
again. 

I am hanging on the Class Christmas tree 
this year several cornucopias overflowing with 
thanks and appreciation. Besides the one for 
S. A. B. there is one for Frances Arnold and 
her collecting well done, and one for Clara 
Vail Brooks, who wrote us such persuasive 
letters for so many years. There is a stream- 
lined, modernistic one for Sue Follansbee 
Hibbard. Her boundless enthusiasm, hard 
work and generosity have added beauty to 
Merion Hall as well as to Rhoads. 

Among the good wishes to each one of you 
for the New Year, is added one for myself — 
that you will send to the Class Editor upon 
receipt of this January Bulletin, a note of 
news about yourself, that can go into the 
February issue. R. S. V. P. and thank you. 

1898 

Class Editor: Edith Schoff Boericke 
(Mrs. John J. Boericke) 
333 Pembroke Road, Bala-Cynwyd, Pa. 

Class Collector: Elizabeth Nields Bancroft 
(Mrs. Wilfred Bancroft) 

It is with great regret that we must report 
the death of Grace Clarke's husband, Vernon 
A. Wright, on October 29th. He had been 
in frail health for several years, but wanted 
Grace to come on for our Fortieth Reunion 
last May, which she enjoyed so much. I am 
sure that all the Class will extend their deepest 
sympathy and love to Grace. 

A letter from Anna Haas was a delightful 
surprise, after Mary Bright and I missed seeing 



her in Lancaster early in October. She was 
preparing then for a visit from her nephew 
and wife and two babies, the oldest one 
named for her father, the fifth generation to 
bear that name. They live in New York. 
Anna has a darling baby grandnephew two 
years old living with them. 

She speaks also of Etta Herr, who always 
came to see her when she visited Lancaster in 
the spring; but she doesn't travel any more, 
but stays with Agnes Perkins at Wellesley, 
and Anna hears from her only at Christmas 
time, when she hears regularly from many of 
her special friends among her classmates. 

1899 
Class Editor: May Schoneman Sax 
(Mrs. Percival Sax) 
6429 Drexel Road, Overbrook 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Class Collector: Mary F. Hoyt 

1900 
Class Editor and Class Collector: 
Louise Congdon Francis 
(Mrs. Richard S. Francis) 
414 Old Lancaster Road, Haverford, Pa. 

The attention of the Class Editor has been 
called to an error in the November Bulletin. 
Eliza Dean Findley's daughter Margaret mar- 
ried Roger Conant Crafts, not Camp. 

Eliza reports that her youngest daughter, a 
graduate of Mount Holyoke, is a second-year 
medical student at the University of Penn- 
sylvania. 

Mary Kilpatrick and her sister Ellen, 1899, 
went to Honolulu in October to visit their 
brother and attend the wedding of their niece, 
Georgia. They expect to stay until the middle 
of January. 

Mary reports going to a party at the beau- 
tiful valley home of Catharine Bean Cox, 1889, 
where the other Bryn Mawr guest was Martha 
Cooke Steadman, 1924. 

Edna Fischel Gellhorn is in New York for 
an indefinite stay. She is living at the Hotel 
Paris, West End Avenue at Ninety-seventh 
Street. 

Helen MacCoy writes: "I see Louise put 
me down last month as having attained 
'Heart's Desire,' in the form of an abiding 
place. Lest you think I would be likely to 
use that sentimental appellation for anything 
that had as much plumbing trouble as this 
place, allow me to announce that the place 
is called and has always been called 'White 
Top' — I don't know why. I shall welcome 
you with joy. It is on Route No. 3 52 — just 
two houses north of the West Chester to 
Philadelphia Pike and the telephone number 
is West Chester 502-R-4." 



[27] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



1901 

Class Editor and Class Collector: 
Beatrice MacGeorge 
Bettws-y-Coed, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

1902 

Class Editor: Elizabeth Chandlee Forman 
(Mrs. Horace B. Forman, Jr.) 
Haverford, Pa. 

Class Collector: Marion Haines Emlen 
(Mrs. Samuel Emlen) 

Emily Dungan Moore keeps up her music 
activities, being a leader in the chorus of the 
Music Study Club of the "Main Line," as well 
as alto-contralto soloist at the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church at Bala-Cynwyd. Her two chil- 
dren are now grown up: David, aged twenty- 
two, in the Navy and married; Phyllis, twenty 
one, in her second year of training at the 
Frankford Hospital. Emily has a granddaugh- 
ter, Phyllis, her son's child, a few months old. 
Not long since, Emily travelled 1,700 miles in 
Scotland, making her headquarters with 
friends on the Firth of Dornach. 

Anne H. Todd keeps up her interest in the 
Visiting Nurse Society of Philadelphia. In 
summer she goes to the fiords of Norway. 
She was there last summer and the summer 
before that, and is going again next year. 
She says to save your pennies to see the 
fiords! They are gorgeous! On her last trip 
she spent a month in London, and returned 
home on the same ship with the two Marion 
Emlens. 

Nan Shearer LaFore is still President of the 
Penn Valley Garden Club, and is on the 
Board of the New Century Club of Phila- 
delphia and the Children's Aid Society of 
Montgomery County, as well. These are only 
a few of her interests. She says there really 
isn't anything to tell! But being four times a 
natural mother and thrice a legal mother and 
a grandmother besides, is a full job for any 
woman. The wife of her son Robert is As- 
sistant Professor in Child Psychology at 
Swarthmore College. Lawrence, the youngest 
son, graduated from Swarthmore last June 
with highest honours and was elected a mem- 
ber of Phi Beta Kappa. He is now studying at 
the Harvard School of Diplomacy, Cambridge, 
Massachusetts. Nan hopes there'll be some 
jobs left in our time. 

May Yeatts Howson in July accompanied 
her husband to the American Bar Association 
meeting in Cleveland, where her son George 
is in business. She has three grandchildren, 
the youngest, Charles 3rd, born in July. 
Charles 2nd built a new home in Villanova 
in September. He and his brother Jim are 
practicing law in their father's law office in 



Philadelphia. Two of May's children live in 
Baltimore: Elizabeth, who is married, and 
Walter. Margaret, May's youngest, graduated 
from Bryn Mawr last June. 

1903 

Class Editor: Mabel Harriet Norton 

540 W. California St., Pasadena, Calif. 
Class Collector: Caroline F. Wagner 

1904 

Class Editor: Emma O. Thompson 

320 South 42nd St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Class Collector: Isabel M. Peters 

1905 

Class Editor: Eleanor Little Aldrich 
(Mrs. Talbot Aldrich) 
59 Mount Vernon St., Boston, Mass. 

Class Collector: 

Margaret Nichols Hardenbergh 
(Mrs. Clarence M. Hardenbergh) 

During the summer in the course of her 
official trip to the Pacific Coast, Caroline 
Chadwick-Collins made brief visits to the fol- 
lowing classmates: Alice Meigs Orr on her 
ranch in Montana, Carla Denison Swan and 
Frederika LeFevre Bellamy at their homes out- 
side Denver, and Leslie Farwell Hill near San 
Francisco. In Santa Barbara, Alice Day 
McLaren gave a tea for her to meet the 
alumnae of that vicinity. Edith Ashley and 
her sister Mabel, 1910, happened to be visit- 
ing Alice at that time. Their summer's journey 
began with crossing the Canadian Rockies to 
Banff and then making their way by slow 
stages, mostly by motor, as far south as Pasa- 
dena and home by way of the Grand Canyon. 

The engagement has just been announced 
of Margaret Thayer Sulloway's son, Alvah, 
and Alison Green, of Great Neck, Long 
Island. He is at Harvard Law School and she 
is a senior at Bennington. 

1906 

Class Editor: Louise Cruice Sturdevant 
(Mrs. Edward W. Sturdevant) 
3006 P St., Washington, D. C. 

Class Collector: 

Elizabeth Harrington Brooks 
(Mrs. Arthur S. Brooks) 

1906 sends its deepest sympathy to Beth 
Harrington Brooks, whose husband, Arthur 
Brooks, died after a very brief illness on No- 
vember 18th. Mary writes: "He was the salt 
of the earth, and full of charm and kindly 
wit." 



[28] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Mary Richardson Walcott has a grand' 
daughter, Susanna, born to her son, John, and 
his wife, Cornelia Sage, of Albany, on Nc 
vember 11th. 

Mary Withington is now "Executive Secrc 
tary" of the Yale Library. On the Librarian's 
retirement last June he was presented with a 
volume entitled Papers in Honour of Andrew 
Keogh, of which Mary was the general editor 
and to which Anne Pratt contributed "The 
Books Sent from England by Jeremiah Dum' 
mer to Yale College.'" Anne Pratt has also to 
her credit Isaac Watts and His Gifts of Boo\s 
to Tale College, issued last summer as Number 
II. of a series of Yale University Miscellanies. 
Mary spent last summer on her brother'in' 
law's ranch in British Columbia. 

Anne Pratt spent the summer of 1937 tour' 
ing Norway, Sweden, Finland, Denmark, and 
England with Genevieve Thompson Smith, 
1907. Some of their experiences were thrilling. 

Helen Brown Gibbons writes to tell us of 
the engagement of her son, Lloyd, to Miss 
Elizabeth Roy, of Troy. Helen's son'in'law, 
Alpheus Thomas Mason, has just published 
The Brandeis Way, A Case Study in the 
Wor\ings of Democracy, which the New York 
Times classes as a "must" book. Her daugh' 
ter Mimi is still in Manila, and Hope is a 
full-fledged junior at the New Jersey College 
for Women. Helen's address is 34 Vande' 
venter Avenue, Princeton. She has sold the 
other house. 

1907 

Class Editor and Class Collector: 
Alice M. Hawkins 
Low Buildings, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

On learning in the November Bulletin 
that there is no longer anywhere on file on 
the campus a copy of the 1907 Class Book, 
the Class Editor immediately presented to the 
Library for the College archives her last re' 
maining spare copy of the volume, complete 
with photographs. 

This last month has been very profitable 
from the standpoint of 1907 news. We have 
even learned that Miriam Cable Gruenberger 
is now living in this country, spending the 
winter at the Orrington Hotel, Evanston, 
where her sixteen'year-old daughter is going 
to school. 

Another rare bird, Comfort Dorsey Rich' 
ardson, was captured by Edna Brown Wherry 
and brought to New York to meet us. Her 
young are more than fledglings now — Dorsey 
graduated from Yale last year and is teaching 
at the Slade School in Maryland, and Henry 
is a senior at Princeton. Henry, by the way, 



told his mother that all his contemporaries 
found that they could always count on Hoi' 
tense Flexner's contributions to the T^ew 
Tor\er to be amusing and quotable. 

Marie Wing writes that she has had "a 
very busy and satisfying two years and a 
half ... as Regional Attorney of the Social 
Security Board for Ohio, Kentucky and Michi' 
gan. ... It is a great privilege to be part of 
the staff having the responsibility of the Social 
Security program in these important begin' 
nings." 

Mary Tudor says that she is in the United 
States of America (Cambridge) for a few 
weeks only because "At present, I am spend' 
ing most of my time in Europe trying to do 
my small part in helping to meet the great 
problems which face the world." 

We have, of course, heard a good deal 
about the hurricane, but shall not repeat much 
unless we can make some sort of deal like that 
told us by Elizabeth Pope Behr of a village 
wit, whose property had been badly damaged, 
and who sought to salvage his fortunes by 
parading around with a sandwich board read' 
ing: "For 25 cents I will listen to your hur- 
ricane story." Popie, however, did not waste 
her breath on past troubles. When asked 
about her daughter, who is at Miss Wheeler's 
School, she said that Elizabeth's interest in 
dramatics has decided her to go to Vassar next 
year, while at present this is manifested by 
serving as one of the three voices of God in 
an ancient Christmas play. Popie's greatest 
claim to fame just now is that her sister'in-law 
is the author of Grandma Calls It Carnal, a 
best seller to which Popie contributed some 
wise criticism. She swears that every incident 
and phrase is true. 

Esther Williams Apthorp lost her best boat 
in the hurricane, but is somewhat comforted 
by her son Bill's prowess on the Milton Acad- 
emy football team. That boy is good at every 
thing he tries. — (Ed. comment). 

There is an excellent article on medical 
social work in the December issue of Social 
Wor\ Today, written by Antoinette Cannon, 
illustrated by a handsome photograph of the 
author. 

The above item was offered as an exhibit 
by Grace Hutchins, who said that her last 
meeting with Tony took place in downtown 
New York on May Day, when they literally 
bumped into each other as they were trying 
to find their proper positions to march in 
their respective C. I. O. unions. 

In a recent visit to New York we were able 
also to check up on M. Morison, M. Bailey, 
E. Thayer, M. Ballin, D. Forster Miller, Julie 
Benjamin Howson and Grace Brownell Dan' 
iels. The first two still are the main props of 



[29] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



the English department of the Chapin School 
and spend their free time in Connecticut — Old 
Lyme and New Canaan, respectively. Ellen 
continues her editorial work at the Common' 
wealth Fund. She had a very interesting vaca- 
tion this summer, Brittany, Paris, and a con' 
vention of psychoanalysts in the Italian 
Lakes region. May is planning to go to 
Florida to continue her sporting life in cold 
weather. Dorothy is a power in the real 
estate world in New York, and her lightest 
word may decide whether you get your apart- 
ment redecorated or keep on looking at that 
dingy paper. Julie has endless interests. She 
and Popie now seem to be involved in the 
Euthanasia Society. Bunny's daughter, Susan, 
has just announced her engagement, and will 
soon go to live in Utica. 

Eunice Schenck, with her colleague, Mar- 
garet Gilman, 1919, published in the October, 
1938, issue of the Romantic Review an impor- 
tant article on the first text of Baudelaire's 
poems, Le Voyage and UAlhatros. 

The Class sends its most loving sympathy 
to Brooke Peters Church, whose daughter 
Diana, Bryn Mawr 1938, died in September, 
only six months after her happy marriage to 
Richard Talbot Tindale. 

1908 

Class Editor: Mary Kinsley Best 
(Mrs. William Henry Best) 
1198 Bushwick Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Ckss Collector: Eleanor Rambo 

Although she died June 5th at the Jefferson 
Hospital in Philadelphia, word has only just 
been received of the death of Anne Jackson 
Bird. The Class will be grieved to learn this. 

Your Editor travelled joyously out to Kan- 
sas City, Missouri, with the New York City 
Health Department delegation to the annual 
American Public Health Association conven- 
tion, thereby missing Alumnae Week-end and 
meeting not a single 1908er and collecting 
no news. 

However, Nellie Seeds (Mrs. Nellie M. 
Seeds) reports: "Robert Nearing (her son) 
was married on September 24th to Miss Jeanne 
Will, of Pine Plains, New York. We had a 
small family wedding at Willow Brook. They 
are taking over the running of my farm, the 
postoffice address of which, by the way, has 
been changed from Stanfordville to Clinton 
Corners, New York. 

"My son John, who has been in Russia for 
the past six years, left there last summer and 
is now registered at the University of Paris, 
where he hopes to obtain a degree in chem- 
istry.'" 



1909 

Class Editor: Anna Elizabeth Harlan 
3 57 Chestnut St., Coatesville, Pa. 

Class Collector: Evelyn Holt Lowry 
(Mrs. Holt Lowry) 

1910 

Class Editor: Izette Taber de Forest 
(Mrs. Alfred V. de Forest) 
88 Appleton St., Cambridge, Mass. 

Class Collector: Frances Hearne Brown 
(Mrs. Robert B. Brown) 

On October 26th, listening to Station WBZ 
in Boston, I suddenly heard the words: "Elsa 
Denison Jameson has, with Eva von B. Hansl, 
published in this month's Ladies' Home Jour' 
rial a poem entitled 'The Child Speaks to Its 
Parents'." Did I prick up my ears to hear the 
quotations that followed and then did I rush 
to the nearest newsstand for a copy of the 
Journall There it was in black and white — 
our Elsa a poet! And later I learned that the 
poem was again used over WEAF's coast-to- 
coast network as a sustaining program. Elsa 
saw the program "Let's Talk It Over!" made 
and put through rehearsal, and finally heard 
and watched it from the control room. Four 
voices spoke for the four age periods of the 
child, with suitable background music. 

Frances Hearne Brown's son Harry was 
married September 17th to Dorothy Luders, 
of Hinsdale, Illinois. One of the ushers was 
the son of Anna Dunham Reilly and another, 
the son of Dorothy Coffin Greeley. Frances' 
daughter, Antoinette, is Director of the 
Winnetka Nursery School. 

And speaking of Winnetka, our son, Taber, 
and his wife, Marion Archbald, Bryn Mawr 
1937, are settled in Chicago and living at 
887 Ash Street, Winnetka. I hope that 
sooner or later they may have the good for- 
tune to meet all of you 1910 Chicagoans and 
your families. Needless to say, Alfred and 
I plan many visits to Winnetka, so don't be 
surprised to have me suddenly appear at your 
front door. Our daughter, Judy, is in her 
first year at Tufts Medical School in Boston, 
enchanted with dissection, believe it or not. 
She's living at home for a change, and we 
hold our breath and thumbs to make it last 
as long as possible. 

Brewster's third son, Henry, is spending the 
winter away from the Illinois farm and with 
us, studying architectural design in Boston, so 
we're running a regular college dormitory. 

Alfred and I escape to New Hampshire 
from this studious atmosphere every week-end 
to superintend the lumber camp that used to 
be our enchanting wooded farm. We've got 



[30] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



out so far one thousand twelve-foot pine logs; 
and we wake in the mornings to the sound of 
axes and saws, and the horses dragging the 
scoots over ledges and swamp. 

1911 

Class Editor: Elizabeth Taylor Russell 
(Mrs. John F. Russell, Jr.) 
1085 Park Ave., New York City 

Class Collector: Anna Stearns 

1912 
Class Editor: Margaret Thackray Weems 

(Mrs. Philip Weems) 

9 Southgate Ave., Annapolis, Md. 
Class Collector: Mary Peirce 

1913 
Class Editor: Lucile Shadburn Yow 

(Mrs. Jones Yow) 

385 Lancaster Ave., Haverford, Pa. 
Class Collector: Helen Evans Lewis 

(Mrs. Robert M. Lewis) 

1914 

Class Editor: Evelyn Shaw McCutcheon 
(Mrs. John T. McCutcheon) 
2450 Lakeview Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Class Collector: Mary Christine Smith 

Knick Porter Simpson paid a flying business 
visit to Chicago after Thanksgiving with her 
husband, who is referred to in the papers as 
"that dynamic, red-haired young committee- 
man (Republican) from New York." She 
wants Bryn Mawrtyrs to know her telephone 
number, which has been removed from the 
book — Atwater 9-0990. 

I am about to pay my annual call in Bos- 
ton — one day with Jackie at Harvard, one 
day with Shaw at Milton, and one with Helen 
Shaw Crosby, who is on Beacon Hill this win- 
ter instead of Hingham. 

1915 
Class Editor: Margaret L. Free Stone 

(Mrs. James Austin Stone) 

3049 44th St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 
Class Collector: Mildred Jacobs Coward 

(Mrs. Jacobs Coward) 

1916 

Class Editor: Catherine S. Godley 

2873 Observatory Ave., Hyde Park 
Cincinnati, Ohio 

Class Collector: Helen Robertson 

Rebecca Fordyce Gayton has a nice silver 
cup on her living-room mantel this year. Her 
older daughter, Louise, took her boat to the 
Central New York Yacht Racing Association 



Regatta at Chautauqua last summer and the 
cup is the result. This is Louise's last year at 
Knox School. She has always said she did not 
want to go to college but seems now to be 
having a change of heart with For's help. 
At present Bryn Mawr is one of three colleges 
she has under consideration. For has evidently 
not slowed down her own pace for she admits 
she has put two thousand miles a month on 
her current yellow car. 

1917 

Class Editor: Bertha C. Greenough 

203 Blackstone Blvd., Providence, R. I. 

Class Collector: Dorothy Shipley White 
(Mrs. Thomas Raeburn White) 

Our deepest sympathy is extended to Thalia 
Smith Dole whose father died October 28th 
in Ogunquit, Maine. He had retired last year 
from the Board of Examiners of the public 
schools of the City of New York, after forty 
years of service. He was a poet and play- 
wright, as well as the author of such well- 
known textbooks as Longman's English Gram.' 
mar. Magazines frequently printed his ar- 
ticles, stories, and verses. 

Betty Faulkner Lacey's father and mother, 
Dr. and Mrs. Herbert F. Faulkner, celebrated 
their golden wedding anniversary on October 
4th at a most informal surprise party at Betty's 
house. All seven children were there, includ- 
ing Ellen, 1913. Betty wrote: "It did us all 
good after all we had been going through. 
My children had a narrow escape out in my 
Ford when they were overtaken by the hurri- 
cane. They finally had to leave the car in the 
square, where it sat for two days until the 
roads could be cleared of fallen trees. My 
doctor-husband made his way to the hospital 
on foot before the storm was over, as the 
telephone was out of commission and he was 
on surgical service. He spent day and night 
there for several days as there was no way 
of his being reached at home. Fortunately, 
despite the fact the flood was even worse than 
two years ago there was no loss of life. What 
breaks our hearts is West Hill! All the beau- 
tiful pine woods are laid low. There was a 
grove of trees near the house that formed a 
lovely little glen showing from the living-room 
windows. This and the woods beyond, which 
were so deep and beautiful they seemed like 
a cathedral, are all wiped away — there is a 
sawmill there and a lumber camp. Of course 
the Hill will never come back to its former 
beauty in our time. We have to make up our 
minds to like lots of sunshine and great open 
spaces — not to mention a great deal of re- 
foresting for future generations. The road 



[31] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



up the Hill is not cleared yet (October 31st) 
but father is doing a marvellous job riding 
around on horseback, bossing his crews of 
woodsmen, clearing out the brush, digging up 
stumps, etc." Keene alone has lost two thou- 
sand elm trees. Since this news we have heard 
that Dr. Lacey has gone to Europe on a vaca- 
tion, but that Betty was not able to go with 
him. He will be back for Christmas. Betty 
incidentally is deep in Church Alliance work, 
being President for the second year. "I enjoy 
it but it is very demanding.'" 

Eleanor Dulles sailed on the 26th of No- 
vember on her way to Geneva for the Inter- 
national Labor Office meeting as a member 
of the Committee on Investing Social Insur- 
ance Funds. She will be back before Christmas 
in time to hang up the stockings! 

Anne Wildman Dyer is now living in New 
York, where her husband has a very interest- 
ing radio job. 

1918 

Class Editor: 

Mary-Safford Mumford Hoogewerff 
(Mrs. Hiester Hoogewerff) 
179 Duke of Gloucester St. 
Annapolis, Md. 

Class Collector: Harriett Hobbs Haines 
(Mrs. W. Howard Haines) 

1919 

Class Editor: Frances Clarke Darling 

(Mrs. H. Maurice Darling) 

12 Lee Place, Bronxville, N. Y. 
Class Collector: 

Mary Thurman Martin, pro tem. 

(Mrs. Millard W. Martin) 

1920 

Class Editor: Teresa James Morris 
(Mrs. Edward K. Morris) 
4950 Hillbrook Lane, Washington, D. C. 

Class Collector: Josephine Herrick 

At a tea in Washington "to meet Miss Ap- 
plebee," I was greeted by: "Well, why aren't 
you playing hockey?" Indeed, seeing Miss 
Applebee looking just the same — well, I must 
admit it took a little imagination to change, 
in my mind, the black lace dress to that brown 
tunic — I wondered why I wasn't playing 
hockey. After all, didn't I win my first tennis 
tournament last summer — ladies' singles at 
Gibson Island! 

Another party — only this time it was Dot 
Smith McAllister's. Dot took "time out" from 
politics to give a delightful cocktail party in 
the charming old house to which she recently 



moved: 415 Wolfe Street, in historic Alex- 
andria. Did you all see Dot's picture in the 
November ]unior League Magazine? 

Another new address is Alice Harrison 
Scott's: 201 Prospect Avenue, Princeton. 

Leita Harlan Paul lives at 49 Autumn 
Street, New Haven. She says that she has 
no exciting news, but I'm sure that life is far 
from dull when she and Ballou (Margaret 
Ballou Hitchcock) get together. 

1921 

Class Editor: Elizabeth Cecil Scott 
(Mrs. Frederick R. Scott) 
1823 Park Avenue, Richmond, Virginia 

Class Collector: 

Katharine Walker Bradford 
(Mrs. Lindsay Bradford) 

1922 

Class Editor: Katharine Peek 

Rosemont College, Rosemont, Pa. 

Class Collector: 

Katharine Stiles Harrington 
(Mrs. Carroll Harrington) 

1923 

Class Editor: Isabelle Beaudrias Murray 
(Mrs. William D. Murray) 
284 N. Broadway, Yonkers, N. Y. 

Class Collector: Frances Matteson Rathbun 
(Mrs. Lawrance Rathbun) 

Harriet Price Phipps, met at Mme. Carriere's 
French Class (chez Betty Moseley Wight) 
supplied the following news: 

Elizabeth Newbold went to Europe this past 
summer. She made the most complete tour 
imaginable in six weeks, covering England, 
France, Italy and Switzerland. She feels that 
she made a record of some sort because she 
saw more places, things and peoples in a given 
time than she ever heard anyone boast of 
before. As though that were not enough of 
an achievement, she also got to California in 
the same fabulous summer before going back 
to her job of teaching in a school on Staten 
Island. 

Ann Fraser Brewer and family have come 
to dwell in Westchester County. They are 
living on Warren Street in Hastings-on-Hud- 
son, New York. We hope to have more news 
of them for next month now that they have 
come conveniently close to Yonkers. 

Irene Lemon took a group of her students 
from the Horace Mann School to Boston on 
a field-trip to study Colonial history at first 
hand. 



[32] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



1924 

Class Editor: Mary Emily Rodney Brinser 
(Mrs. Donald C. Brinser) 
85 Washington St., East Orange, N. J. 

Class Collector: Molly Angell McAlpin 
(Mrs. William R. McAlpin) 

1925 

Class Editor: Elizabeth Mallet Conger 
(Mrs. Frederic Conger) 
Dongan Hills, Staten Island, N. Y. 

Class Collector: Allegra Woodworth 

By now our words are so rare as to be 
almost priceless. Practically no one alive today 
remembers when we used to have Class Notes. 
Soon people will start coming around to have 
a look at our space. Perhaps archaeologists 
will get a theory about it and try excavating. 
In the meantime we may cash in on it and 
use it for advertising — just a little personal 
graft of our own, but not this month, how 
ever, for at last we really have some letters. 

Betty Smith Thompson writes from Schenec- 
tady: "John Robey Thompson tipped the 
scales at 9 lbs. 4 oz,s. on October 12th 
(he is not named Columbus!) and still howls 
lustily for food in the middle of the night. 
Fve forgotten what it feels like to have 
enough sleep. John's big sister Ann is three, 
and very fond of her brother — fortunately. 
. . . Peg Gardiner is teaching English in 
Union, New Jersey, just outside of Newark. 
Helen Henshaw still plays the organ in the 
Presbyterian Church in Albany and teaches 
music in the Albany Boys'" Academy. Me, I 
practice child guidance in the home with a 
vengeance! — and I'm also President of the 
Schenectady County Birth Control League." 

Maris Constant Job and Bernard have 
moved to Canada — 1 Rosemont Avenue, 
Westmount, Montreal, P. Q. "It was a little 
strange at first having labels on Crisco and 
Dutch Cleanser cans printed in French as well 
as English, but when a scandal about con' 
demnation of property for a public market 
broke in the papers, I felt right at homer 

Helen Herrmann (1620 Fuller Street, N. W., 
Washington, D. C): "I stayed in New York 
last winter, not working, to see something of 
my family, and having made the break I have 
nobly refrained from job-hunting and have 
finally tackled that most unpleasant of unoffi- 
cial jobs — Ph.D. thesis. The surroundings are 
pleasant anyway. This apartment is directly 
opposite the Italian Embassy so I can spy 
nicely when the war finally comes. ... I 
should love to see anyone who is passing 
through Washington and wants a bed." 



1926 

Class Editor: Janet C. Preston 

Kenwood, Catonsville, Md. 
Class Collector: Mary Tatnall Colby 
(Mrs. I. Gordon Colby) 

It is a shock and a grief to hear that Miss 
Agnes Smith, 1916, the sister of Lucy Smith 
Dean, died suddenly in December. 

Many of us had our way lighted by her 
inspired teaching, and have had the privilege 
of her friendship. We know how fortunate 
we were. Our deepest sympathy goes out to 
Lucy and to her family. 

Annette Rogers Rudd is for the moment 
localized at Fernside, Tyringham, Massachu- 
setts. If winter comes (and there seems no 
chance of putting it off) she and her husband 
will regretfully move to New York and estab- 
lish themselves in their apartment at 27 Wash- 
ington Square, North. But until then they 
are having too much fun in the country re- 
building their house. Annette says: 

"We are moving all the bathrooms, putting 
in a furnace, concreting the cellar, and arrang- 
ing a new bedroom. I love all the excitement 
and don't mind the mess. Of course in work- 
ing on a house as old as this you run into all 
sorts of things, such as a rotted sill and a large 
New England rock, just where they have to 
put the furnace." 

Life is like that ... in all times and even 
in all countries. . . . Cf. Jennie Green Turner, 
who writes from Dairen, Manchuria: 

"A great deal of entertaining goes on, 
mostly in the form of bridge-teas and dinner 
parties. When we first arrived we were nearly 
swamped trying to keep up with the social 
whirl. Our apartment over the consulate is 
very big and beautifully laid out for enter- 
taining, but we have been having our troubles. 
First the furniture didn't come until April, 
and then the place was all torn apart to be 
replastered and painted. Plaster takes forever 
to dry and we are still without window cur- 
tains. Seems as if we'll never be settled 
properly. 

"In desperation, we've been taking people 
to restaurants. Let me explain that there are 
no chop suey palaces! You can go to either 
a Chinese or a Japanese place, which are radi- 
cally different from each other. A Japanese 
place is all on one floor with lots of rooms 
partitioned off by sliding screens. You leave 
your shoes at the door, as the floors are cov- 
ered with matting, and sit on cushions on the 
floor around low tables. You always have a 
private room for your party and numerous 
geisha 'who cook the meal right in the middle 
of the table over a pot of hot coals. Every- 
body dives into the central dish with their 



[33] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



chopsticks and ends up with a bowl of rice, 
tea, and fruit. We went to one very big party 
for about fifty people where they had geisha 
to do various dances with flags, cherry bios- 
soms, umbrellas, etc., while the people ate. 
Japanese version of a floor show. 

"Chinese places are quite different. They 
are several stories high, with the rooms open' 
ing from a central court and a big stair going 
up in the middle. You keep your shoes, and 
sit on chairs around a circular table, while 
the 'boys 1 bring in a succession of dishes 
which are placed in the middle, and then 
everybody grabs with their chopsticks. Fifteen 
to twenty dishes is an average dinner. You 
have thousand'year'old eggs, melon seeds, 
sharks" fins, birds'nest soup, sweet pork, 
Pekin duck, and various fish dishes. Some of 
the things are quite delicious, and I much 
prefer this sort of thing to the Japanese food. 

"At the end of the meal the correct thing 
is to recline on couches, which are provided 
in a small adjoining alcove, and smoke a pipe 
of opium. We tried this once, with eight 
people taking turns on one pipe, but I must 
confess that I couldn't make the darned thing 
draw, and have no sensations to describe. 

"On the serious side of life I am taking 
Japanese conversation lessons and find it dif- 
ficult. The construction is completely different 
from anything I have tackled so far, and I 
am still in the stage when nobody under' 
stands what I am trying to say. Occasionally 
I put over a few sentences to shopkeepers 
and consider I have scored a minor triumph. 

"Am hoping to make a trip to Peking soon, 
and then will have something to write about. 
Dairen is very commercial and not at all ex' 
citing. But it has lovely surrounding country 
and good bathing beaches." 

Jennie says that whatever we may think, 
Manchuria is a civilised country and they get 
the New York Times every day. She doesn't, 
however, say what Times on what day. By 
these standards even Maryland is a civilized 
country (New York papers please copy), and 
to prove it we quote from the Times of No' 
vember 27th: 

"That Nancy Hamilton revue, One for the 
Money, still is knocking at the Broadway door, 
though the knocking just now is by another 
hand. Stanley Gilkey and Gertrude Macy 
had every intention of producing the show. 
... In the background now stands Rowland 
Stebbins, who is definitely interested if Mr. 
Gilkey and Miss Macy finally are forced to 
give it up. Robert F. Cutler, who tried out 
the revue at his summer theatre in Suffern 
early last fall, is associated with the G. M. 
combination; the option is in effect until mid- 
January." 



An interesting thought for you to ponder 
until our next. 

1927 

Class Editor: Ruth Rickaby Darmstadt 
(Mrs. Louis J. Darmstadt) 
179 East 79th St., New York City 

Class Collector: Dorothy Irwin Headly 
' (Mrs. John F. Headly) 

Dot Irwin Headly, our expert Class Collec 
tor, is the mother of four very lively young' 
sters — Jonathan, nine; Betsy, seven; Peter, five, 
and Sara Mary, six months. They live in 
Ardmore and Dot finds time to garden, draw 
and tend to her knitting. They spent the 
summer at the seashore. Dot naturally hears 
from a great many of the Class, among them 
Hazel Fits, who recently telephoned Dot and 
gave her an interesting account of her work 
as an Anglican Sister, which Dot promises to 
relay to me, and so to this column. 

Gladys Jenkins Stevens is one who has ap' 
peared in this column all too seldom. Now 
she breaks the long silence and says that she 
is the head of the household of two daughters, 
Mary Otis, ten, and Gladys P., age nine, and 
a half sister, thirteen. She is also Secretary 
of the Old Chatham Hunt. (Glade lives in 
Old Chatham, New York.) She describes her 
leisure interests as horses, dogs, children, 
hunting, farming and gardening. Last winter 
she spent four months at Pampano, Florida. 

Constance Jones Quinn lives in Bryn Mawr 
and is Director of the lower school, the first 
six grades, at the Baldwin School. She also 
teaches fifth and sixth grade English and His' 
tory. This summer Connie and her husband 
made a flying trip to England and Paris, lim' 
ited to three weeks in all because of her hus' 
band's vacation. They hired a car and "made 
a dash around Southern England and spent 
a few days in London and Paris." Mary Ken' 
nedy Nelms and her husband were abroad all 
summer but Connie failed to "connect." 

Minna Lee Jones Clark moved to Albany 
this fall where her husband will teach at the 
New York State College for Teachers. They 
left New Canaan last spring and spent the 
summer with Minna's family in Old Benning- 
ton, Vermont. 

Darcy Kellogg Thomas lives in Augusta, 
Georgia, and spends her summers at the Kel' 
logg place at Dark Harbor, Maine. She has 
two children, Landon, III., aged four, and 
Cornelia, almost two. Darcy is a member of 
the Southern Alumnae Scholarship Commit' 
tee and her activities also include being 
"Chairman of Conservation for Georgia for 
the Garden Club of America" (to quote Mme. 
Thomas's exact language). Her political ac' 



[34] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



tivities include being Georgia Representative 
for the Women's National Republican Club. 
As the mother of two, Darcy, we hope, took out 
plenty of accident insurance before attempting 
any such hazardous role. Republicans in 
Georgia! Now I ask you! She also gardens, 
farms and plants pine trees. 

Julia Lee McDill, who now, as you know, 
lives in Woodstock, Vermont, all year round, 
lists her vocation as housewife. They have 
two children, John Lee, five and a half, and 
Jane Stuart, almost three. Julie is President 
of the Vermont Maternal Health League and 
Chairman of the Program Committee of the 
local Parent-Teachers Association. She farms 
and gardens. Last March they went to Mexico 
and in May they went to Arkansas for her 
brother's wedding. This summer, Julie took 
the children to Martha's Vineyard for two 
weeks. She writes: "My news is slight and 
purely local. The longer one lives in a small 
town, the more involved one gets in all its 
affairs, so that life in a big city seems simple 
in comparison. A group of us organised a 
Parent'Teachers Association here last winter 
in the hope of improving the out-of-date and 
" ' very poor schools in town. To date we have 
accomplished nothing, but an enormous fight 
is looming on the horizon, so there may be 
some hope for the future. In the rest of my 
spare time I work for the Maternal Health 
League. Our own life consists of building up 
the small farm we live on and enjoying the 
country more every year." 

Elinor Parker since October 1st has been in 
charge of children's books at the Scribner 
bookstore, which is at 597 Fifth Avenue, New 
York. She writes: "This is really the only 
news worth noticing on this questionnaire and 
I hope it will get into your notes some time, 
as I want everybody to come in and look me 
up." So with possible Christmas shopping in 
mind, I am making an exception to the usual 
alphabetical order. From 1928 until this fall, 
Elinor was Assistant and later, General Mana- 
ger of The Bookshop at Morristown, New Jer- 
sey, where she still lives. Last March she 
helped entertain the Alumnae Council. Her 
hobbies are still singing and playing the piano 
and in addition four new ones, needlepoint, 
knitting, sailing and skiing. Elinor says that 
she has taken no trips since the Coronation, 
but in the summer she goes up to Northeast 
Harbor, Maine, whenever possible. 

Katharine McClenahan True has a most dc 
lightful address: 3 Easy Street, San Juan Del 
Monte, Risal, Philippine Islands, but her 

I household of three babies, one dog, two 
monkeys and two ducks doesn't sound like 
easy street to me. Her children are Perry, 
ten; Kay, seven, and Peter, just under two. 



She mentions having been home for a year, 
1936-1937, and seeing Elisabeth Norton Pot- 
ter and Nortie at that time very kindly passed 
the news on to this column. 

Alice Matthew Huse, as previously reported, 
is living in Staten Island. She has two sons, 
Guy, almost five, and Rupert, three and a 
half. She writes that she still reads French, 
German and Italian. Your Editor sees Al now 
and then and can report that the four Huses 
lead a very healthy and happy life. 

Dorothy Meeker took a Mediterranean trip 
this summer— Egypt, Greece and Italy. Dot 
writes that she is studying medicine at Colum- 
bia. "It took me a long time to decide," she 
continues, "but I'm half way through now and 
having the time of my life." She often lunches 
with Carol Piatt, now Mrs. William C. Leff, 
who now lives near the Presbyterian Medical 
Center in New York City. Mary Sherman 
Harper, whose husband is stationed at Fort 
Meade in Maryland, occasionally visits Dot. 

Mary B. Miller broke her long silence and 
answered the questionnaire. She was laid up 
with her "game leg" for almost the last three 
years but is "once more starting back again." 
She is already active in the volunteer hospital 
service. Mary Bell still lives in Richmond but 
takes frequent trips to New York, New 
Haven, Washington and Virginia Beach — "no 
serious travelling," as she puts it. 

Agnes Mongan spent four months this sum- 
mer in Europe and the last two weeks were in 
London before and during the signing of the 
Munich pact. Agnes is the Keeper of Draw- 
ings at the Fogg Art Museum of Harvard. 
She is also a member of the Executive Com- 
mittee of the Boston Museum of Modern Art 
and she writes for various art periodicals. She 
writes that she has plenty of interests but no 
leisure. 

Elisabeth Nelson Tate makes us au courant 
with her life since graduation with this brief 
statement, "Housewife and mother since spring 
of 1932 after four years of Turkish Embassy 
and one year of Congressional Library." The 
Tates have two sons, Robert Wood, nine, and 
Thomas Nelson, five and a half. Lis tells us 
that her husband has just been made General 
Counsel of the Social Security Board. Lis 
for the past two years was Scholarship Chair- 
man of the Washington Bryn Mawr Club and 
her other leisure activities include piano les- 
sons and mild gardening. 

Agnes Newhall Stillwell lives in Princeton. 
Her alumnae activities? Hear ye! She is a 
member of the Academic Committee and the 
Treasurer of the Northern New Jersey Schol- 
arship Fund. Agnes has two very young sons, 
Richard, two and a half, and Theodore, four 
months. This is Theodore's first appearance 



[35] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



in this column. She writes: "I am trying to 
combine taking care of two children with writ' 
ing up my excavations in Corinth. The chil- 
dren are doing very much better than the 
book." 

Elizabeth Norton Potter has just been 
elected to the Board of the New York Bryn 
Mawr Club and at the moment is deep in the 
preparations for the opening tea as she amiably 
consented to be Entertainment Chairman. As 
you know, she lives in New York and in the 
summers she and her husband take a house in 
Connecticut and spend most of their time 
sailing. Nortie continues her art interests and 
gets to most of the exhibitions as well as 
taking an occasional course. The high point 
of their summer was a two weeks 1 cruise in 
their Alden cutter to Martha's Vineyard. 

Lucy Norton Longstreth lives in Washing- 
ton's Crossing, Pa. This summer the Long- 
streths fished and camped on the Raquette 
River in the Adirondacks. Lucy says that she 
is a very inactive member of the Junior 
League. She has two recent courses to her 
credit — period furniture last winter and "Mod- 
ern Trends in Literature for Young Children 1 '' 
at Columbia last summer. She gardens, too. 

Harriet Parker, since September 1st, has 
been Assistant Director of the Radcliffe Col- 
lege Appointment Bureau, "which means," 
Harriet amplifies, "helping to check up and 
find employment during and after college — 
including apprentice, part-time, permanent and 
N. Y. A. work. 11 Harriet is a member of the 
Boston Bryn Mawr Club and has been on the 
nominating committee for several years. This 
summer she sat in on a course in personnel 
work in schools and colleges at the Harvard 
Summer School. 

Harriet spent a few days with Sally Peet 
Lewis this summer at the Peet house in Rye 
during one of Sally's infrequent flying visits 
home and I spent a delightful day with them 
swimming, lunching and gossiping. Sally 
brought little Sally, now a little fair-haired 
darling of almost four, with them to our beach 
in East Port Chester and then we all went 
back for luncheon at the Peet house. Sally 
lives in Bryn Mawr and is very happy keeping 
house and gardening. She said that occasion- 
ally Lu Austin Hepburn gets her to do some 
committee work for her, but other than that 
she prefers staying near or on her own hearth. 
They told me that Frances Chrystie had been 
quite ill but that she was still in charge of 
Children's Books at F. A. O. Schwartz in New 
York and doing a beautiful job. Harriet re- 
ported that all was well with Alice Whiting 
Ellis, Edythe Parsons Rich (who recently took 
a trip around the world), Agnes Mongan, 
Gabrielle Sewall and Sara Posey Voss. 



. Madeleine Pierce Lemmon lives in Ardmore 
and is the mother of three girls and one boy. 
The twins, Jane and Nancy, are eight now, 
then comes Constance, six, and Billy, four. 
The girls go to the Baldwin School so Made- 
leine frequently sees Connie Jones Quinn dur- 
ing the school season. Let's hope Connie 
doesn't have the young Lemmons up on the 
carpet at those moments! Madeleine has 
always been deeply interested in her husband's 
profession — medicine — and she spends a good 
deal of her time in the social service depart- 
ment of the Jefferson Hospital. Her other 
hobbies are golf and bridge and she excels at 
both, I have heard. 

Marian Pilton Myers leads the nomadic ex- 
istence of a Navy wife and loves it. At the 
moment they are stationed at Norfolk, Vir- 
ginia. This summer she followed her husband 
on the United States Steamship Wyoming 
which made the midshipmen's cruise to North 
Europe and visited Germany, France, Belgium, 
Netherlands, Denmark and England. This 
fall she followed the Wyoming up and down 
the Eastern seaboard from Charleston to New 
York and intermediate points. She says she 
enjoys good food and likes to cook or go to 
good restaurants. When she stays put long 
enough she raises cats and dogs and gardens. 
She still reads some French and German. 

Sara Pinkerton Irwin lives in Cynwyd and 
has two little girls, Ruth Frances, four, and 
Alice Pinkerton, one, who take up most of 
her time, naturally. But she also finds time 
to garden a small flower bed and be a Board 
member of the Alumnae Association of the 
Philadelphia High School for Girls. 

Beatrice Pitney Lamb lives in New Canaan, 
Connecticut, and writes thus of a recent trip: 
"Spent summer in Europe; travelled four thou- 
sand miles in an auto through seven countries, 
taking photographs and watching what a war 
looks like just before it doesn't break out." 
They stopped by Barbara SchiefFelin Bosan- 
quet's place outside of London but missed 
seeing Barbara as she was in Scotland. Bea's 
description is delightful: "The place has a 
canal running past it on which to punt. A 
cricket game was going on leisurely in the 
field on the other side." Bea has two daugh- 
ters, aged six and five. In New Canaan she 
sees K. Adams Lusk and Sally Jay Hughes but 
she relays no specific news about either of 
them. 

Edith Quier Flippin reports the birth of 
their son on August 18th, James Carroll. 
Edie moved recently to 1828 DeLancey Place, 
Philadelphia. She is a member of the Women's 
Committee of the Social Service Department 
of the University of Pennsylvania Hospital 
and also belongs to the Visiting Housekeepers' 



[36] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Association. She says she sees Ellie Morris 
occasionally at the Junior League. 

Ruth Rickaby Darmstadt vegetates in the 
summer and rushes around like mad in the 
winter. Her alumnae activities are Class Edi- 
tor, Chairman of the Library and Publicity 
Committees of the Bryn Mawr Club of New 
York and Treasurer of the Scholarship Com' 
mittee for the New York District. She is very 
much interested in the Young Women's Chris- 
tian Association and is a member of the New 
York City Board and Chairman of the Physi- 
cal Education Department in one of the 
branches. Last year she was one of the Vice 
Presidents of the New York City League of 
Women Voters but this year her activities are 
limited to Chairing a very small committee 
which is making a survey of the Children's 
Courts in New York City — a fascinating piece 
of field work. Practically every week-end 
while the Darmstadts are in town, they go to 
the country. Their latest sport, or rather 
Rick's, because her husband is an old hand 
at it, is hunting. They love skiing and fishing 
and swimming as the seasons change. Rick 
is slowly learning squash, or rather thinks she 
is, but your Editor is certain it will be a long 
time before she will have the nerve to play 
with Bea Pitney Lamb. 

1928 
Class Editor: Cornelia B. Rose, Jr. 

2333 South Nash Street, Arlington, Va. 
Class Collector: Mary Hopkinson Gibbon 
(Mrs. John H. Gibbon, Jr.) 

Word has reached us that the Class now 
has twins, namely Charles Randolph and 
Georgiana Hamilton Hiestand, who arrived on 
October 17th. Marjorie Young Hiestand's son 
Drew is two years old. 

There are two other new arrivals: Jean 
Fesler Williams has a daughter, Carolyn 
Mayo, born September 28th, and Frances 
Bethel Rowan a son, Hamilton, born on No- 
vember 4th. Hugh Rowan has been trans- 
ferred to Washington so Frances is now living 
at 15 Primrose Street, Chevy Chase, Maryland. 
Francie, Jr., is in the third grade. We're be- 
ginning to feel that it won't be long before 
we will have to report the first grandchildren 
and the first daughters in College! 

Hope Yandell Hanes' husband is now 
Under Secretary of the Treasury and they 
are living at 2812 N Street, N. W., according 
to the Washington Star, which records their 
return from their place at Middleburg, Vir- 
ginia. 

Jo Young Case has been appointed to the 
Board of Directors of the College to fill her 
father's place. Her own term as Alumnae 
Director expired this month. 



1929 

Class Editor: Juliet Garrett Munroe 

(Mrs. Henry Munroe) 

22 Willett St., Albany, N. Y. 
Class Collector: Nancy Woodward Budlong 

(Mrs. A. L. Budlong) 

1930 

Class Editor: Edith Grant Griffiths 
(Mrs. David Wood Griffiths) 
2010 Wolfe St., Little Rock, Arkansas 

Class Collector: Eleanor Smith Gaud 
(Mrs. Wm. Steen Gaud) 

1931 
Class Editor: Mary Oakford Slingluff 

(Mrs. Jesse Slingluff, Jr.) 

305 North way, Guilford, Baltimore, Md. 
Class Collector: Lois Thurston 

1932 

Class Editor: Margaret Woods Keith 
(Mrs. E. Gordon Keith) 
Box 208, Iowa City, Iowa. 

Class Collector: Ellen Shaw Kesler 
(Mrs. Robert Wilson Kesler) 

On a recent trip to Exeter Academy we 
bumped unexpectedly into Ellen Shaw, who 
is married to a most delightful person, Robert 
Kesler, an instructor at the Academy. We 
had a brief but very enjoyable visit in the 
Keslers' apartment in one of the school dormi- 
tories, recently redecorated for them and most 
attractively furnished. 

Wallace and Eleanor Renner De Laguna 
were in Utah this summer, where Wallace was 
working for the United States Geological Sur- 
vey. The De Lagunas are no longer residing 
in Cambridge, where they have spent the last 
few years while Wallace acquired his Har- 
vard Ph.D. in Geology. This year, we under- 
stand, Wallace has a teaching position in a 
college on Long Island. We gleaned this 
much last spring when we met in Cambridge, 
but through absent-mindedness or carelessness, 
failed to learn the name and location of the 
college in question. (Information requested, 
please.) 

Since your Editor is expecting to be some- 
what on the move for the next few months, 
would-be news reporters are requested to send 
any interesting items to her Iowa City ad- 
dress (vide supra) for immediate forwarding. 

1933 

Class Editor: Margaret Tyler Archer 
(Mrs. John S. B. Archer) 
St. Paul's School, Concord, N. H. 

Class Collector: Mabel Meehan Schlimme 
(Mrs. B. F. Schlimme, Jr.) 



[37] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



1934 

Class Editor: Carmen Duany 

Hotel Ansonia, 74th and Broadway 
New York, N. Y. 

Class Collector: Katherine L. Fox 

An account of some astonishing travels of 
Frances Jones, eavesdropped from her corre 
spondence, appears elsewhere in this BullE' 
tin. Frannie, after her year as Ella Riegel 
Fellow in Classical Archaeology at the Ameri' 
can School of Classical Studies at Athens, has 
been covering Asia Minor in general and the 
fertile crescent in particular. According to 
her account it sounds none too fertile and 
mostly hazardous. Tackle it with the atlas. 
This month's space will be strictly limited to 
some brief numerical data, financial and other' 
wise, one engagement, seven marriages and an 
extra special romance reported by someone's 
proud, if indiscreet, mother. 

Jo Rothermel, the Class President, sends 
word that our Reunion gift totalled $202.00 
and will be turned over to the College marked 
"for furnishings of the Quita Woodward Me 
morial Room." 

Susan Daniels' engagement to William 
Pierrepont White was announced on Novem' 
ber 25th. He is a graduate of Hamilton Col' 
lege and the Harvard Graduate School of 
Business Administration and is with the Utica 
Mutual Insurance Company. The wedding 
will take place in the spring. Molly Nichols 
Weld (who has been to France and back in 
December for her brother's wedding), Nancy 
Stevenson Langmuir, Elizabeth Fain Baker and 
Elvira Trowbridge Drake were all at Sue's 
engagement tea with their respective husbands. 

Honour Dickerman was married on May 
21st to James Oliver Brown. 

Suzanne Halstead was married in Athens to 
John Howard Young. 

Constance Robinson was married in Palm 
Beach, Florida, on April 7th to William Anton 
Katholi, a New Yorker and a graduate of 
Columbia. They went to Nassau, Havana and 
New York before settling down in South 
Charlestown, West Virginia, where Mr. 
Katholi is a design engineer with the Carbon 
and Carbide Chemical Corporation. They 
have a four-room apartment which has taken 
all of Connie's time up to now as she had 
to start from scratch learning to keep house. 
It is only now that she is beginning to find 
time for some art work. 

A trio of the Class who used to live tc 
gether in an apartment in New York City 
are now scattered far and wide. The trio are 
Pete, Lou, and Laura, the places include 
Sweden and Trinidad and the reason is matri- 
mony. Pete Jarrett was married in New York 



in May to Dr. Edmund Prince Fowler, Jr., 
an ear specialist. They sailed for Paris, where 
Dr. Fowler gave a paper, and then went on 
to Berlin and Stockholm, where they are liv' 
ing for the time being and, it is rumored, 
writing a book. 

Lou Meneely was married on June 11th to 
G. Ernest Boehme. She writes: "I have found 
myself up to the ears in various and several 
delightful but time-swallowing chores of home 
making. I had just about settled down into a 
routine in our apartment out here in Forest 
Hills when, about a month ago, I was called 
into the New York Office of Meneely Bell 
Company to take on a temporary part-time 
job there.'" 

Laura Hurd's engagement to Robert Motion 
was announced in June and by the time this 
is published she will be married (December 
23rd at Essex Falls) and will be living in 
Port of Spain, Trinidad, where Mr. Motion 
has been stationed for the past six years. He 
works for the West India Oil Company, a 
subsidiary of the Standard Oil of New Jersey. 
Trinidad, in case you have forgotten, is just 
off the coast from Venezuela, near British 
Guiana so Laura, who has often stretched a 
hand overseas and has welcomed many a for' 
eign student to these shores for the Interna' 
tional Students' Committee, will now be over' 
seas herself for a long time to come. 

The following is quoted, without permission, 
from a letter by Betti Goldwasser: "As you 
know, I've been working for the National Re 
sources Committee since July, 1937, doing sta' 
tistics and economics on a study that bears the 
grandiose title of 'The Structure of the Ameri- 
can Economy.' The study is just about com' 
plete, and with the end of the project I am 
indulging in that favorite sport of all Wash' 
ingtonians — job-hunting. The job with the 
National Resources Committee has been very 
interesting, and in the field of corporation 
finance, which was absolutely new to me. A 
young statistician and I were assigned the 
project of studying assets and incomes of the 
large corporations, using the confidential mate- 
rials of the Bureau of Internal Revenue. Of 
course, only summary statistics can be pub- 
lished, but we received a liberal education in 
Big Business while going over the returns of 
big companies. As usual in the Government, 
the job involved a lot of overtime, so to 
facilitate matters, the young statistician and I 
got married last December. This should have 
provided lots more time in which to work on 
the large corporations, but somehow it didn't, 
and I don't think Uncle Sam profited very 
much by our marriage. My husband's name is 
Ezra Glaser, but I still use my own, on those 
occasions when I can convince people that it 



[38] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



is neither immoral nor insane to be a Lucy 
Stoner. Aside from my job, I engage in all 
sorts of socially minded activities. At the 
moment I am involved in peace work, and 
also in a Citizens' Committee on Fair Taxa' 
tion (impressive title, isn't it?) which is try 
ing hard to reform the very poor tax system 
employed in the District of Columbia. In 
such spare moments as I have, I am very dc 
mestic. We have only a small apartment, but 
we do boast a kitchen in which I can create 
all sorts of messes, some of them edible, and 
some of questionable success. Ezra is very 
polite about them and tries not to discourage 
my efforts. For amusement, we have taken 
up sailing on Chesapeake Bay, in a tiny cat' 
boat. The season is officially over, but we 
have not been daunted, and just wrap our' 
selves up a little more warmly and sail off in 
spite of wind, wave and weather. We also 
folk dance, with vigor if not grace. I dis' 
covered to my shame that I had forgotten how 
to dance Peascods, even after all the months 
of rehearsing it for May Day." 

The above mentioned marriages produce Class 
matrimonial data as follows for the close of 
the year 1938: Fifty married from entering 
class of one hundred and five in 1929, forty 
married from graduating class of eightyfive 
in 1934. This probably proves something or 
other. 

Last but not least, the Class has a budding 
romance on its hands. Scene — football game. 
Time— fall 1959. Boy— Mike (Lee McCluer 
Marshall, Jr.). Girl — Sallie (Sarah Latta Car' 
ter). Mickey Mitchell Marshall, the young 
gentleman's mother, sent us the tip. Mike 
weighed eight pounds, three ounces, upon his 
arrival in New York, May 30th, and now, five 
months later, weighs over twenty. Mickey calls 
this slightly bourgeois but we are inclined to 
think it means that he will not be in the stands 
but in the field at that football game. Mike 
and family moved to Rye when he was two 
and a half weeks old (quite a feat) and in 
December he and his mother went to Illinois 
by train for a month's stay. Sarah Latta 
Carter, immediately known as Sally, was born 
October 3rd in Montclair. Sally belongs to 
the Class twice as it were, having Kitty Grib' 
bel Carter for mother and Frannie Carter for 
aunt. 

Elizabeth Mackenzie writes: "I have re 
ceived notification from the University of 
Cambridge today that I have been accepted 
for the M.Litt degree. My thesis on 7 erem y 
Taylor: A Study of His Style' does not autc 
matically have to be published, but it is very 
likely that it will eventually appear from the 
Cambridge University Press. My examiners 
were Mrs. Bennett from Cambridge and Mr. 



de Sola Pinto from the University of Not' 
tingham and both recommended publication in 
book form." 

1935 

Class Editors: Elizabeth Colie 

377 Vose Ave., South Orange, N. J. 

and 
Elizabeth Kent Tarshis 
(Mrs. Lorie Tarshis) 
65 Langdon St., Cambridge, Mass. 

Class Collector: Joan Baker 

We start this month off with both a wed' 
ding and an engagement. If there are more, 
we hope to hear of them, too. 

Catherine Bill's engagement was announced 
after Thanksgiving to James Walton Osborn, 
of Cleveland. Her fiance is a graduate of 
Amherst and a senior at the Western Reserve 
University School of Medicine. They expect 
to be married in June. 

Nancy Wilson was married in Wayne on 
October 15th to Morgan Coffin Roulon, of 
Phoenixville, Pennsylvania. Mr. Roulon is a 
graduate of Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology and an engineer with the W. H. Lamb 
Construction Company, of Philadelphia. 

Margaret Simpson has much to say of her 
trip last summer: "I went with Euretta Si' 
mons, 1936, for a two months and a half trip 
to the Near East; Egypt, Palestine, and Syria, 
ending up with ten days on a French boat 
that called at Rhodes, Smyrna, Istanbul and 
Athens, and a week in Italy. We spent two 
weeks in Jerusalem and its environs with cur' 
few every night and riots every day almost. 
... As for the present, I'm studying Spanish 
at the University of Miami and singing at 
the Conservatory and being tame and domestic 
in my spare time." 

From Mary Bedinger comes word of her 
new work. "After a year's thought I decided 
to enter training (at the Pennsylvania Hospital 
in Philadelphia) because I found social service 
work a disappointment and thought I would 
prefer visiting nurse work for which an R.N. 
is essential. The work is heavy and seems like 
a college course taken in cram fashion, but I 
certainly am glad that I am really enjoying 
myself." 

For the rest of this column we are indebted 
to Jo Baker, who writes: "As for myself, 
I've changed jobs and taken a trip to Ber' 
muda. My new job is swell — I'm Secretary 
to the First Vice-President of W. S. Wasser- 
man Company, an investment banking house 
here in Philadelphia. 

"Betty Seymour has a position at Ogontz 
School for Girls, conducting classes in Eng- 
lish Literature and Composition, as well as 



[39] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



doing the other things a teacher at a private 
school is supposed to do. 

"Chris McCormick is further pursuing the 
lights of learning, doing work in Greek His' 
tory at The American School of Classical 
Studies at Athens, where Miss Swindler is Vis' 
iting Professor and is working on her book.'" 

1936 

Class Editor: Barbara L. Cary 
Merion Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Assistant Editor: Elizabeth M. Bates 
9 Fernwood Road, Summit, N. J. 

Class Collector: Ellen Scattergood Zook 
(Mrs. W. H. Dunwoody Zook) 

Residence on the Bryn Mawr campus, be it 
temporary or permanent, is certainly to be 
recommended for ambitious Class Editors. In 
any case, many roads seem to lead to Bryn 
Mawr, as we have had ample evidence this 
fall. By means of various emissaries from near 
and far, as well as the five of us who are here 
for the year, a great deal of interesting news 
has been assembled. 

First of all, the Editors must apologize for 
an omission from our last report, which was 
in singularly bad taste. To wit, we neglected 
to mention the presence of Sherry Matteson 
on the campus, as Warden of Pembroke East. 
And it was not because we hadn't seen her, 
for on the contrary many of the items con' 
tained in our column were supplied by her. 
Sherry is doing full'time work in Geology, 
in addition to her job as Warden, so she has 
her hands full. 

And this month, from the combined source 
of Sherry and Scat (Ellen Scattergood Zook) 
we have obtained a real scoop in the form 
of two long letters from Do Canaday. Most 
important and interesting fact gleaned from 
them is that Do sails for the United States 
on December 17th and will be home after 
Christmas. However, let her speak for her' 
self in a select quotation taken from an eight' 
page saga which sounds like something from 
the Arabian Nights! 

"But of course there's no denying the fas' 
cinations of travel in this part of the world. 
I spent the summer driving with various people 
through Northern Greece, Jugoslavia, Ger' 
many, visiting in Switzerland, touring mu' 
•seums in Italy. Reached Athens only to pre' 
pare for a far more strenuous trip into the 
"hinterlands of Asia Minor. From Stamboul 
to Troy to Pergamon, Smyrna, Ephesos and 
the ancient cities along the Meander Valley 
and farther East. Then on October 11th I 
came into Syria, another world altogether, 
where *life is cheap in hot countries' and 'one 
is obliged to live dangerously'." By way of 



editorial elaboration, we would like to insert 
here a sentence from another letter of Do's 
which justifies the latter quotation. She says, 
"From there (somewhere in Central Turkey — 
illegible! — Eds.) I continued solo — and wear' 
ing an eight-karat wedding ring which I had 
purchased for a dollar in Athens just for this 
purpose — to Konya and on through the Cicil' 
ian Gates and the Taurus Mountains to 
Tarsus." 

And as if that weren't almost too much 
good luck to have in one month, along comes 
a letter from Marge Goldwasser to Scat which 
tells of yet another classmate who is carrying 
on what sounds like a fascinating double job, 
on top of having joined the ranks of the 
newly weds. Marge was married last June to 
Mr. Wilfred Wyler and they are living in an 
apartment at 11 West 69th Street, New York 
City. We heard about the wedding first from 
Dr. Weiss, who came in one day to tell us 
that Marge had an article published in Mind, 
a philosophical magazine. She herself reports 
that she has "a full'time job doing publicity 
work and some research for our Theological 
Seminary here. In addition I am trying des' 
perately to finish my thesis. . . . Besides all 
this for the past two years I have been much 
disturbed about the plight of the Jews in 
Europe. I am Chairman of the Junior Divi' 
sion of the Joint Distribution Committee here 
in New York." 

The first Saturday in December promises to 
be a busy one for any members of 1936 who 
happen to be in or near Philadelphia, for on 
that day Sherry Matteson and Bar Cary are 
jointly giving a tea for 1936. Fourteen of 
the Class are expecting to be here, plus two 
or three husbands. If they all do really ma' 
terialize it will be an even better reunion than 
we had in the end of October when many 
came back for Alumnae Week'end and the 
dedication of the Science Building. At that 
time we saw "Marnie" Bridgman Macey and 
"Puddle" Halstead for the first time in ages. 
Marnie was East for a visit with her family 
and managed to stay a little extra while be 
cause Jim got sent East at the end of her stay 
for a two weeks' business trip. She seems very 
busy out in San Francisco, raising white mice, 
entertaining visitors from the East, including 
Mrs. Chad wick' Collins, who was there early 
in September, and any number of other ac 
tivities. Puddle had a job in a bookstore in 
New York this summer which had vanished, 
but she was continuing in New York in search 
of something else. 

Rosie Bennett has been seen around Bryn 
Mawr once or twice which leads us to suspect 
that she has a job as technician at the Bryn 
Mawr Hospital, but confirmation is lacking. 



[40] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Char Robinson is completing her second 
year of training for her diploma as a Regis' 
tered Nurse at the University Hospital in 
Philadelphia. 

Fabe (Eleanor B. Fabyan) is rumored to 
be studying law at Harvard, as well as con- 
tinuing her work with the Civil Liberties 
Union in Boston. 

Margaret Bergstein was married last Decern' 
ber to Mr. Jerome Goldman. Their home is 
in Cincinnati, but they are frequently in New 
York and Washington because of Bergie's 
husband's law practice. 

"Chappie" (Marian Chapman) Bogard and 
her husband have moved again and are now 
living at 18115 Forrer Avenue, Detroit. 

1937 
Class Editor: Alice G. King 

61 East 86th St., New York City 
Class Collector: Sarah Ann Fultz 

Betty Lou Davis was married on August 25th 
to John Waring Pope and is living at 1654 
Massachusetts Ave., No. 63, Cambridge, Mass. 

Syb Evans was married on June 22nd to 
Joe Taylor. She is living at Allen's Lane, 
west of Wissahickon, Mt. Airy, Philadelphia, 
and is teaching at the Springside School. 

Jeanne Macomber was married June 18th to 
Robert Zottoli. Her address remains the same, 
66 Crabtree Road, Squantum, Mass. 

Lollie Musser was married September 17th 
to William Floyd, 2nd. Her address is 380 
S. Portage Path, Akron, O. 

Betsy Ballard has also been married since 
reunion last spring to Mr. Frank Fowle, and is 
living at 1435 N. Hudson Ave., Chicago. 

Estie Hardenbergh came East last summer 
and was captured for a flying visit. She was 
not sure what she was going to be doing this 
winter. A few days later Lucy Kimberly also 
turned up in Maine, just back from Europe. 
Edith Rose, we hear, has come up to New 
York from Mexico City for a couple of weeks 
and Amelia Forbes has deserted the wild and 
woolly West for prosaic Massachusetts for a 
few months anyway. She stopped off on her 
way here to see Margy Lacy at St. Katlv 
erine's School in Davenport, Iowa, and Jean 
Cluett in Troy, N. Y. Cluett is busy marry 
ing off her sister and expects later to be in 
Washington again. 

Peggy Jackson is back in Boston this win' 
ter and working at the Fogg Art Museum. 
Hinckley Hutchings is at the Fine Arts, trav 
elling about and giving lectures at various 
schools. Helen Cotton is teaching at Concord 
Academy, and Tish Brown and Rachel Brooks 
are both at the Simmons School of Social 
Work in Boston. 



We don't know what Anne Fultz is up to, 
but among other things she's collecting money 
for the Alumnae Fund, and here's hoping 
more of '37 will be able to give this year. 
Thirteen is a lucky number, but it is a pretty 
small number out of 123! R. W. B. 

1938 

Class Editor: Alison Raymond 

114 E. 40th St., New York, N. Y. 
Class Collector: Mary Whalen Saul, pro tem 
(Mrs. Robert Saul) 

Jane Farrar writes from Columbus, Ohio, 
that she is a reporter on the Ohio State Journal 
and that she is loving it. She was having 
lunch that day with James Thurber, and was 
feeling inspired, she said, to "stagger on with 
the writer's torch!" 

Gertrude Leighton has been studying all 
autumn at the Philadelphia Academy of Fine 
Arts. She is carrying out a most sensible idea 
of trying out the things she likes, to see which 
one she wants to settle down to do. When 
one is better than average at archaeology, act' 
ing, the arts (including both sculpture and 
painting), and playwriting, it makes a wider 
range of choice than most of us can have. 
After Christmas, she is thinking of studying 
playwriting at Columbia. We New York 
Bryn Mawrtyrs hope she will. 

Dave Bakewell is doing Junior League work 
in New Haven, Tillie Tyler says. Any details 
seem to be lacking. 

Anne Reynolds came East last week on a 
flying visit. She is doing welfare work in 
Marquette until after Christmas, and is then 
going down to Florida, to equal or surpass 
her sword-fishing record of last year. She is 
known in Florida fishing circles for her speed 
and ability in catching these great creatures. 

What are the rest of you doing? If you 
feel too shy to write of yourselves, won't you 
write us of your friends' activities? There is 
no other way of knowing what has become 
of everyone. 

One of the two Katharine M. Gibbs Memo' 
rial Scholarships for the current year has been 
awarded to Mary Sands, who is studying at 
the Gibbs School and competed with 100 other 
girls. She was written up in their magazine 
as follows: 

"Miss Sands, who lives in Chicago, Illinois, 
graduated from Bryn Mawr in June. She has 
held several scholarships during her college 
course and was continuously on the dean's list. 
She was a member of the Student Council, 
Players Club, and Glee Club; business manager 
of the Glee Club and of the literary magazine. 
During her senior year she was honored with 
the presidency of her class, and viccpresidency 
of the undergraduate association." 



[41] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



If 






DIKECTOIY 



The Agnes Irwin School 

WYNNEWOOD, PENNA. 

Grades V to XII 

A College Preparatory 

School for Girls 

Kyneton School 

VILLA NOVA, PENNA. 
Pre-school and Grades I to IV 

BERTHA M. LAWS, A.B., Headmistress 



The Madeira School 

Greenway, Fairfax County, Virginia 

A resident and country day school 

for girls on the Potomac River 

near Washington, D. C. 

150 acres 10 fireproof buildings 

LUCY MADEIRA WING, Headmistress 



Wykeham Rise 

WASHINGTON, CONNECTICUT 
IN THE LITCHFIELD HILLS 

College Preparatory and General Courses 

Special Courses in Art and Music 

Riding, Basketball, and Outdoor Sports 

FANNY E. DAVIES, Headmistress 



BRYN MAWR COLLEGE INN 
TEA ROOM 

Luncheons 40c - 50c - 75c 
Dinners 85c - $1.25 

Meals a la carte and table d'hote 
Daily and Sunday 8:30 A.M. to 7:30 P.M. 

AFTERNOON TEAS 
THE PUBLIC IS INVITED 

MISS SARA DAVIS, Mgr. 
Tel: Bryn Mawr 386 



THE 
SHIPLEY SCHOOL 

BRYN MAWR, PENNSYLVANIA 

Preparatory to 

Bryn Mawr College 



ALICE G. HOWLAND 
ELEANOR 0. BROWNELL 



r» Principali 



The Ethel Walker School 

SIMSBURY, CONNECTICUT 

Head of School 

ETHEL WALKER SMITH, A.M. 
Bryn Mawr College 

Head Mistress 

CHARLOTTE WELLES SPEER, A.B. 
Vassar College 



Rosemary Hall 

Greenwich, Conn. 
COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

Constance Evers ) 

Eugenia Baker Jessup, B.A. , Headmistresses 
Bryn Mawr College ) 

Caroline Ruutz-Rees, Ph.D. 

Mary E. Lowndes, M.A., Litt.D. 



Advisers 



Approved Penna. Private Business School 

BUSINESS TRAINING 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
AND SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 
for young men and women. 

One, Two and Three Years 
Day and Evening Courses 
8 Weeks Summer Session 




Founded 1865 

PEI RCE 

Pine St. West of Broad 



SCHOOL 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



Kindly mention Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



i 



9 



ECTORY 



FERRY HALL 

Junior College: Two years of college work. 
Special courses in Music, Art and Dramatics. 

Preparatory Department: Prepares for 
colleges requiring entrance examinations, 
also, for certificating colleges and universities. 

General and Special Courses. 

Campus on Lake Front — Outdoor Sports — 
Indoor Swimming Pool — Riding 

For catalog address 

ELOISE R. TREMAIN 

LAKE FOREST ILLINOIS 



The Baldwin School 

BRYN MAWR, PENNSYLVANIA 
A Resident and Country Day School for Girls 

Ten Miles from Philadelphia 
Stone buildings, indoor swimming pool, sports. 
Thorough and modern preparation for all lead- 
ing colleges. Graduates now in over 40 colleges 
and vocational schools. 

ELIZABETH FORREST JOHNSON 
HEAD OF THE SCHOOL 



The Katharine Branson School 

ROSS, CALIFORNIA 
Across the Bay from San Francisco 

A Country School College Preparatory 

Head: 
Katharine Fleming Branson, A.B., Bryn Mawr 



A Book of 
Bryn Mawr Pictures 

32 Gravure Reproductions of Photographs by 

IDA W. PRITCHETT 

"The pictures are extraordinarily fresh and inter' 
esting, the text a golden mean between explanation 
and sentiment, and the form of the book is 
distinguished." President Park. 

Now on Sale at the Alumnae Office for $1.00 

(10 cents extra for postage) 



T0W-HEYW00n 

I J On theSound^AtShippm Point \J 

ESTABLISHED 1865 

Preparatory to the Leading Colleges for Women. 
Also General Course. 

Art and Music. 

Separate Junior School. 

Outdoor Sports. 

One hour from New Yor\ 

Address 

MARY ROGERS ROPER, Headmistress 

Box Y, Stamford, Conn. 



MISS BEARD'S W^Sj 


, 


bCHUOL 

Excellent Preparation for the 
Leading Colleges for Women 

General Courses with 
Elective* in Household Arts, 
Music, and Art 
Metropolitan opportunities in drama, 
art, and music. Country life and 
outdoor sports; hockey, basketball, 
lacrosse, tennis, archery, riding. 

Lucie C. Beard, Headmistress \ 
Box 84, Orange, Niew Jersey j 











La Loma Feliz 

SANTA BARBARA, CALIFORNIA 

Residential School, Kindergarten through College 
Preparatory, for boys and girls who need especial 
attention or change of environment because of 
physical handicaps. No tuberculous or mentally 
retarded children can be received. 

INA M. RICHTER 

Medical Director and Head Mistress 

B.A. Bryn Mawr, M.D. Johns Hopkins 



ABBOT ACADEMY 

ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 
Over a century of achievement as its heritage. 
Rich traditions combined with modern methods. 
Thorough college preparatory course; also gen- 
eral course with emphasis on the fine arts. 
Excellent equipment. Beautiful country campus 
twenty-three miles from Boston. All sports. 
MARGUERITE M. HEARSEY, Principal 



THE MARY <♦ WHEELER 
SCHOOL 

Excellent college preparatory record. General course, 
choice of subjects. Class Music, Dancing, Dramatics. 
Art for all. Hobbies. Daily sports on 170 acre Farm. 
Riding, Hunting. Separate residence for younger girls. 
Mary Helena Dey, M. A., Principal, Providence, R. I. 



Kindly mention Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletii 



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Ready for Delivery . . . 
BRYN MAWR 

PLATES 



A prompt order will help the Alumnae Fund 
* *- 

Price $15 a dozen 

(POSTAGE ADDITIONAL) 



Color Choice 
□ Blue □ Rose □ Green □ Mulberry 



Ma\e chec\s payable and address all inquiries to 

Alumnae Association of Bryn Mawr College, 

The Deanery, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 



Kindly mention Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



College Publications — 



Colleges and schools are exacting in the accuracy 
and quality of their printing — and rightly so! The 
printer serving this field must measure up to an 
exceptionally high standard. The John C. Winston 
Company for more than thirty years has served 
the colleges and schools in this section of the 
country so well that many of the first accounts are 
still prominent in the rapidly increasing list. 

This same accuracy and quality extends to the 
printing of catalogs, booklets, folders, private 
editions, etc., handled through the Commercial 
Printing Department. Then, too, the versatility of 
our equipment many times offers a surprising price 
advantage. 

The John C. Winston Co. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



Jf orm of pequesit 



I give and bequeath to Bryn Mawr College, 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, the sum of 

dollars. 




MY NEW YEitR 7 I li ' h U I N 




FOR MORE PLEASURE 



Copyright 1939, Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 



BRYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 
BULLETIN 




NEWS OF THE SUMMER SCHOOL 
ACADEMIC COMMITTEE QUESTIONNAIRE 



February, 1939 



Vol. XIX 



No. 2 



Entered as second-class matter, January 15, 1921, at the Post Office, Phila., Pa., under Act of March 3, 1879 

COPYRIGHT, 1939 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



OFFICERS OF THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President Ida Lauer Darrow, 1921 

Vice-President Yvonne Stoddard Haves, 1913 

Secretary Dorothea Chambers Blaisdell, 1919 

Treasurer Margaret E. Brusstar, 1903 

Chairman of the Finance Committee Edith Harris West, 1926 

Directors at Large ( Gertrude Hearne Myers, 1919 

( Ellenor Morris, 1927 

ALUMNAE SECRETARY, Mildred Buchanan Bassett, 1924 

EDITOR AND BUSINESS MANAGER OF THE BULLETIN 

Marjorie L. Thompson, 1912 

DISTRICT COUNCILLORS 

District I Elizabeth Lawrence Mendell, 1925 

District II Ruth Cheney Streeter, 1918 

District III Mildred Kimball Ruddock, 1936 

District IV Ruth Biddle Penfield, 1929 

District V Eloise G. ReQua, 1924 

District VI Delia Smith Mares, 1926 

District VII Katharine Collins Hayes, 1929 

ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 
Eleanor Little Aldrich, 1905 Adelaide W. Neall, 1906 

Mary Alden Morgan Lee, 1912 Ethel C. Dunham, 1914 

Eleanor Marquand Forsyth, 1919 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ALUMNAE FUND 
Edith Harris West, 1926 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 
Louise B. Dillingham, 1916 

CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUND COMMITTEE 
Caroline Lynch Byers, 1920 

CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
Dr. M. Elizabeth Howe, 1924 

CHAIRMAN OF THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE 
Serena Hand Savage, 1922 



TABLE OF CONTENTS: 



Editorial page 1 

The Visit to Germany, by Rufus M. Jones page 2 

The Alumnae Fund page 3 

The Summer School Moves to Its Own Campus page 4 

The President's Page page 6 

Training in Public Welfare Service Now Offered by the 

College page 8 

An Informal Account of the Directors 1 Meeting, 

by the Alumnae Directors page 1 

News From the Districts page 1 1 

The Alumnae Bookshelf page 1 2 

Many Voices 

By Helen Wieand Cole, Ph.D., 1918 
Stars Over the Schoolhouse 

By Eleanor L. Lord, Ph.D., 1896 
Cityward Migration 

By Jane Crumrine Moore, 1933 
The Old House Remembers and Small Town Portraits 
By Constance Deming Lewis, 1910 

News of Faculty and Alumnae page 15 

Undergraduate Notes, by Emily Cheney, 1940 page 17 

Deanery Notes page 18 

College Calendar page 19 

The Academic Committee Asks for Alumnae Opinion 

About Phi Beta Kappa page 20 

Academic Committee Questionnaire page 22 

A Letter to the Editor page 22 

Class Notes page 23 



Bryn Mawr Alumnae 

Bulletin 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 
THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNA ASSOCIATION 

Marjorie L. Thompson, '12, Editor and Business Manager 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

Caroline Morrow ChadwicK'Collins, '05 Denise Gallaudet Francis, *32 

Emily Kimbrough Wrench, '21 Louise Congdon Francis, '00 

Pamela Burr, *28 Barbara L. Cary, '36 

Ida Lauer Darrow, '21, ex-oficio 

Subscription Price, $1.50 a Tear Single Copies, 25 Cents 

Checks should be drawn to the order of Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 

Published monthly, except August, September and October, at 1006 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

All material should be sent to the Alumnae Office the first of each month. 

Vol. XIX FEBRUARY, 1939 No. 2 



There is no more healthy sign of growth than the desire on the part of an 
institution or a department to develop its activities so that they conform to the 
changing pattern of life. Certainly anyone who reads this number of the Bulletin 
cannot fail to be impressed by the constant and delicate adaptation to current needs 
that is continually taking place on the Bryn Mawr campus. It shows itself in a 
dozen different ways. The article on the new course that offers training in Public 
Welfare work, is a case in point. What the Undergraduate Editor has to say is no 
mere record of events, but to one who reads with sympathy and imagination it is 
a mirror that reflects very clearly the response of the winter students to the social as 
well as to the economic and political changes in the world beyond the campus. One 
expects to find exactly this same response on the part of the Summer School students. 
Nowhere has a greater change taken place than in both the philosophy and organiza- 
tion of Labour. Since 1921, when the Summer School was started, "to help the 
students obtain a true insight into the problems of industry, 11 the School has pioneered 
courageously to attain this end and has made a contribution that cannot yet be eval- 
uated, not only to workers 1 education but to the techniques of progressive education 
in general. Hilda Smith, 1910, just returned from the meetings of the International 
Labour Organization, that branch of the League of Nations which concerns itself 
with industrial and rural workers, reports that both England and France are interested 
as never before in what we are doing in international affairs, in trying to solve 
economic problems, and in education. And Labour is especially interested in what we 
are doing in workers 1 education. French trade unionists are planning to visit this 
country this summer. From the first the Bryn Mawr Summer School for Women 
Workers in Industry has done admirably what European democracies regard as almost 
impossible: it has combined a holiday with educational activities. Just how far the 
School's influence has gone we cannot say, but we do know that the Bryn Mawr School 
was chronologically the first of its type. Now, as the Summer School Board itself says, 
for the School to establish itself independently "is a direct and logical outgrowth 
and culmination of eighteen years of experimentation on the Bryn Mawr campus. 11 
We can all feel proud that Bryn Mawr has made a significant contribution not only 
to the teaching of women in industry but to the whole field of workers 1 education. 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



THE VISIT TO GERMANY 

A TRIP TAKEN UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE 
FRIENDS 1 SERVICE COMMITTEE 

By RUFUS M. JONES 



IT will never be possible to know how 
how far our visit to Germany can be 
called successful. The results of it are 
of an intangible sort. They cannot be put 
down in black and white and summed up 
or cashed in. They are largely to be felt 
and appreciated in terms of atmosphere 
or spirit or other impalpable impressions 
on minds and hearts rather than in terms 
of things that can be weighed and 
measured. 

It can be said, I think, that in the main 
we did what we went to do. To those 
who needed help most we carried, by our 
presence at this crisis in their lives, a 
silent message of goodwill, and we made 
them understand that there was someone 
who cared and who sympathised and who 
suffered with them, and who was eager 
to help. From that point of view the 
journey was worth making and it reached 
its goal. We felt and found each other. 

We found the agony of suffering 
almost greater than we expected. The 
"glass-breaking day" — November 10th — 
had destroyed every synagogue in Ger- 
many so that all corporate public worship 
for Jews in that country was at an end. 
Nearly every Jewish shop, and many pri- 
vate homes had all the glass on the street- 
front smashed and much of the property 
destroyed. Thirty- five thousand Jewish 
men were carried off to concentration 
camps where most of them still were 
during the nine days of Arctic cold and 
storm which enveloped Europe during 
our visit. It was a veritable reign of 
terror for those long-suffering people. 
Our first concern was to make a study of 
the actual need of food and feeding sta- 

[2 



tions for those who had no financial re- 
sources left. Four English Friends had 
come over to Germany just before we 
arrived to investigate the situation in dif- 
ferent parts of Germany and we had the 
advantage of their reports. There is a 
good deal of actual suffering in some 
parts of the country even now and it will 
grow much more acute as the winter goes 
on and as existing Jewish funds for relief 
are depleted. 

We are convinced that the main need 
will be money rather than workers. The 
Jewish Central Relief Committee for all 
Germany is well equipped to handle the 
relief work and if we can get funds to 
them, they can carry on the feeding work 
throughout the Reich. We secured per- 
mission from the highest authorities to 
bring in money for the Jews, to send at 
least two Quaker Commissioners to visit 
the cities and to oversee the work of the 
Central Jewish Committee. The Execu- 
tive Board of the Service Committee has 
decided to send two Commissioners, one 
to Berlin and one to Vienna and to pro- 
ceed to raise a public relief fund for car- 
rying out our recommendations. 

We did a good deal of work on plans 
to accelerate the emigration of Jews and 
to secure some scheme by which they 
might bring out some of their wealth or 
property and by which they would be 
free from further persecution while they 
were waiting to migrate. As the Inter- 
governmental Refugee Commission, with 
its headquarters in London, had been set 
up to accomplish these very things, we 
were bound in honour to co-operate with 
them rather than work on our own lines. 

] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



For this reason I left the two other 
Friends — D. Robert Yarnall and George 
A. Walton — in Berlin and I went across 
to London for three days 1 work there 
with the American members of the Inter- 
governmental Commission. Our work 
together in London was most harmonious 
and co-operative. On my return we had 
an important visit with the Finance Min- 
ister, Dr. Schacht,* who told us in confi- 
dence of the way in which plans for a 
vast emigration of Jews from Germany is 
being worked out. This plan, of course, 
is not our Quaker plan, but if it can 
accomplish the purpose we shall rejoice. 
In our two-fold work of arranging for 
relief and promoting emigration, we had 



* By the time the Bulletin was in page- 
proof, Dr. Schacht was no longer Finance 
Minister. The effect this will have on emigra- 
tion plans is not yet known. 



visits to the heads of most of the impor- 
tant departments of the governments. 
We were received courteously and in a 
friendly spirit. On all occasions we had 
an opportunity to interpret our Quaker 
aims and ideals, to review the story of 
our work in Germany and Austria, and 
we were received with a heartiness and 
friendliness which greatly cheered us. 
We have every reason to believe that the 
moment of our arrival was a favorable 
one and that the coming of the Quakers 
in this crisis, like the earlier coming, 
touched a deep chord in the hearts of 
the people and there can be no question 
that the members of the government with 
whom we worked — some of them very 
prominent men — received us in the spirit 
in which we came and made us feel that 
the old friendly atmosphere is not wholly 
vanished. 



THE ALUMNAE FUND 

THE RHOADS SCHOLARSHIPS 



THE item "Rhoads Scholarships" ap- 
pears regularly in the Alumnae As- 
sociation Budget, yet many of the 
alumnae probably do not know why it is 
there. 

The James E. Rhoads Memorial Schol- 
arships were founded by a committee of 
alumnae and faculty in 1897 with an 
endowment of $8,000, increased in 1911 
to $10,000. From the income, one sopho- 
more full tuition scholarship and one 
junior were to be awarded each year by 
a committee composed of alumnae and 
members of the faculty. As the tuition 
was gradually increased from $200 in 
1914 to $500 in 1930, the income from 
the fund was no longer sufficient to pay 
the two scholarships, and the Alumnae 



Association agreed to supplement it by 
$500 each year to make the Rhoads Schol- 
arships full tuition grants as originally 
intended. That amount is, therefore, in- 
cluded in the budget and paid out of the 
Alumnae Fund. 

It would be ideal if the endowment 
could be increased to cover the two schol- 
arships but in the meanwhile, every donor 
to the Alumnae Fund has the satisfaction 
of knowing that she helps a promising 
student to continue at Bryn Mawr and 
does her part to keep green the memory 
of Dr. Rhoads, the beloved first President 
in whose honour Rhoads Hall is named. 

Edith Harris West, 1926, 
Chairman of the Finance Committee 

and of the Alumnae Fund. 



[3} 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



THE SUMMER SCHOOL MOVES TO 
ITS OWN CAMPUS 



THE Board of Directors of the Bryn 
Mawr Summer School for Women 
Workers in Industry has taken the 
lease of two houses at West Park on the 
Hudson, New York. This statement was 
made following a recent meeting of the 
Executive Committees of the Board of 
the Summer School and of the Board of 
Directors of Bryn Mawr College in joint 
session. In announcing this new plan 
the Board of the Summer School said in 
part: 

"The plan makes possible a pro- 
gram expanded to meet the changing 
needs of the labour movement and 
the constantly increasing demand for 
various types of workers' education 
programs to supplement the summer 
session. In a world in which de- 
mocracy is threatened on all sides, 
both the College and labour mem- 
bers of the Board welcome this op- 
portunity to extend the program of 
education for which the Summer 
School has always stood. 

"It was only after a period of 
careful consideration that the Sum- 
mer School Board arrived at its deci- 
sion to plan a program on a broader 
basis and with greater opportunities 
than those afforded by a women's 
college available only for the sum- 
mer months. . . . 

"We are confident that . . . this 
change is an opportunity for a more 
realistic and far-reaching program 
which conserves all the advantages 
in the former set-up, and that the 
Hudson Shore School is a direct and 
logical outgrowth and culmination of 
eighteen years of experimentation on 
the college campus. 11 

The present Board of the Summer 
School, including representatives of Bryn 
Mawr College, labour groups and fac- 
ulty and students of the School, will con- 
tinue in office, but the Board will be in- 



creased to include a larger representation 
of labour, and a council of advisers 
headed by President Park will be ap- 
pointed to widen the support and empha- 
size the importance of the School. 

At the joint meeting of the Executive 
Committees, the Summer School Board 
presented the following resolution: 

"The Board of Directors of the 
Summer School wishes to express to 
the Directors of Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege, first, its appreciation of the 
notable contribution made by the 
late M. Carey Thomas, then Presi- 
dent of Bryn Mawr College, in 
initiating the School in 1921, thereby 
laying the foundation for a rapidly 
growing movement in workers 1 edu- 
cation; second, of the support given 
by the College during the past 
eighteen years, which has included 
the use of the College campus and 
equipment, the active help of mem- 
bers of the College faculty and staff, 
the wise and generous assistance of 
two College Presidents, President 
Thomas and President Park, whose 
leadership has guaranteed freedom 
of thought and expression as the 
condition of the enterprise; third, of 
the long and actively expressed in- 
terest in the School of President 
Park of Bryn Mawr College, and 
especially of her contribution as 
Chairman of the Summer School 
Board during the past three years. 
In the light of her thorough knowl- 
edge and understanding of the 
School, she has interpreted its poli- 
cies and given wise direction to the 
development of administration and 
teaching. Students, faculty and di- 
rectors value the contribution she has 
made to the workers 1 education 
movement. 

"The Summer School Board hopes 
that the accomplishments of these 
years are a source of as deep grati' 
fication to the College as they are to 



[4] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 






the Board. The education of some 
fifteen hundred women workers has 
been made possible in the summer 
sessions, and many of these have 
played effective roles in industrial 
relations, in progressive legislation 
and in workers 1 education through' 
out the United States. 

"The Summer School Board is 
convinced that these activities must 
be further promoted, even though 
the School no longer occupies the 
Bryn Mawr campus, and it hopes 
that a relationship of good will and 
understanding in the furthering of 
similar aims will be maintained be 
tween the School and Bryn Mawr 
College." 

In accepting this resolution presented 
by the Summer School, the Executive 
Committee of the College expressed its 
appreciation of the work of the Summer 
School in its sessions at Bryn Mawr and 
of the help it had given to the cause of 
workers' education in the country at 
large. The Committee believed that Bryn 
Mawr had gained much in the many 
years of association with the School. 
They acquiesced in the feeling of the 
Summer School Board that the time had 
come when the growth of the School 
demanded wider scope than a college 
campus could give. 



The members of the Summer School 
Board are as follows: Representing Bryn 
Mawr College: Marion Edwards Park, 
President of Bryn Mawr College, Chair' 
man of the Summer School Board; 
Eleanor Lansing Dulles, 1917, of the 
Bureau of Research and Statistics, Social 
Security Board, Washington; Elisabeth 
Nields Bancroft, 1898; Hilda W. Smith, 
1910, Educational Executive, Works 
Progress Administration; Josephine Gold' 
mark, 1898; Mary L. Coolidge, 1914, 
Professor of Philosophy at Wellesley 
College; Agnes Brown Leach, Trustee of 
the College. Representing Labour: Rose 
Schneiderman, Secretary to the New 
York State Department of Labour; 
Edith Christensen, head of the Labour 
Service Department of the Affiliated 
Schools for Workers; Mabel Leslie, Di' 
rector of the Art Workshop, New York 
City, and member of the Mediation 
Board for New York State of the Na- 
tional Labour Relations Board; Matilda 
Lindsay, National Organiser for the Na- 
tional Federation of Federal Employees. 
Representing the Summer School Fac- 
ulty: Amy Hewes, Professor of Eco- 
nomics and Sociology at Mount Holyoke 
College; representing Summer School 
students: Sally Russian. 



1939 ALUMNAE COUNCIL 



THE Alumnae Council will be held 
this year in New Haven, Connecti- 
cut, on Thursday, Friday and Saturday, 
March 9th, 10th and 11th. This is the 
first District I. Council since 1933 when 
the meetings were held in Boston. It 
will be interesting for the delegates to 



visit another "college town," having had 
a glimpse of Princeton last year. The 
local committee, under the leadership of 
the Councillor, Elisabeth Lawrence Men- 
dell, 1925, is working with the Executive 
Board on plans for the various sessions, 
and formal and informal meetings. 



m 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



THE PRESIDENTS PAGE 

EXCERPTS FROM THE CHAPEL SPEECH MADE BY 



PRESIDENT PARK, 

ON last Friday, the Board of the 
Summer School met with the 
Board of the College (the two 
Executive Committees acting as their rep- 
resentatives) and announced its decision 
to proceed with a long-range plan, to set 
up its own home where not only summer 
but winter sessions can be held when that 
is financially possible, where institutes for 
labour groups can meet at once and 
where through experimentation in the 
Summer School proper, which will re- 
main the centre of its interest, the School 
may meet the changing needs of labour. 

This decision has been reached by the 
Board of the School, somewhat to its sur- 
prise. This does not mean "suddenly." 
At the request of the Board last spring a 
survey in two sections was prepared by 
the Department of Social Economy (Pro- 
fessor Fairchild supervising, Florence 
Hemley, the graduate student in charge), 
the first dealing with the present status 
of workers 1 education, the second com- 
pleting the history of the School already 
carried to 1927 by Helen Hill Miller and 
Hilda Smith. Since last February many 
hours of discussion have been spent by 
the Board and by committees on possi- 
bilities of the School if continued at Bryn 
Mawr and if transferred to its own home. 

Three winters as Chairman of the 
Board and three summers of close living 
with the School have to my own surprise, 
converted me. At first I took for granted 
that I should want to see the experi- 
ment continued on the Bryn Mawr cam- 
pus, organised as it had been, with the 
same curriculum and set-up. But instead 
I found myself believing that the School 
was now ready to move independently, 
to recognise and maintain its own stand- 



JANUARY 10, 1939 

ards, to experiment wisely but freely in 
helping women workers meet their prob- 
lems. Those workers are themselves a 
new group; increased in numbers since 
1921, organised into energetic and serious 
unions, far more aware of their own 
problems and the use of education in 
meeting them. But I found myself believ- 
ing that, for all this, increase in labour 
representation on the Board of the School 
was needed, a pied a terre absolutely its 
own, more leeway as to length of session 
than this or any college campus can give. 
I suppose we should have still hesi- 
tated to strike out on a new venture if 
place and person just fitted for our needs 
had not been found. Jean Carter, A.B. 
University of Rochester, long head of the 
Department of English in the Rochester 
High School, teacher of English at the 
Bryn Mawr Summer School for several 
sessions, Director of the School in 1936 
and 1937, Associate Director last sum- 
mer, has accepted, and accepted with 
enthusiasm, the Directorship of the new 
School. Miss Carter is experienced in 
workers 1 education, wise, courageous, 
liked by everyone who knows her. The 
Board has leased the estate of Hilda 
Smith, 1910, on the Hudson at West 
Park, across the river and a little farther 
north than Poughkeepsie, sixty acres, high 
above the river and with a magnificent 
view of it, almost untouched forests be- 
hind, two large houses, a stone dock 
house, a barn, so that sixty-five students 
can be housed. "Vineyard Shore 11 has 
been used for four years as a winter 
school for workers under Miss Smith, as a 
home for many conferences and last sum- 
mer as a camp run by the Friends 1 Serv- 
ice Committee for the lodging of German 



[6] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



refugees. It is a better vacation place 
than Bryn Mawr — cooler, rural, not sub- 
urban. Its lack of access to a college 
library can perhaps be met by a loan 
from Vassar, ten miles away. 

I ask you to read the resolution* drawn 
up by the special committee, headed by 
Mabel Leslie, one of the representatives 
of women in industry. You will find it 
a fine statement. 

Bryn Mawr College has been deeply 
concerned with the Summer School. 
President Thomas saw in a kind of vision 
the original idea. Professor Kingsbury 
guided and helped the School through all 
its early years. Hilda Smith left the 
Deanship of the College to accept its 
first Directorship, members of the faculty 
and many alumnae have served on its 
Board and many more on its regional 
committees, many faculty and alumnae 
have taught in the School along with 
teachers drawn from other schools, col' 
leges, and universities. Undergraduates 
in a long succession have worked in its 
various and boiling activities and had ex- 
periences they can never forget. Finally 
from many Bryn Mawr sources, alumnae 
and undergraduate, funds have been 
raised to make its annual sessions possible. 

As Chairman of the Summer School 
Board I am wholeheartedly for the larger 
and I believe sounder plan. I believe 
that the moment for independence has 
come, the clock has struck. If the School 
stays, by the very fact of partnership, 
restricted as all partners are, it may fall 
short of what it ought to do, perhaps 
finally even become mild and insignifi- 
cant. As an alumna I should like to state 
my personal opinion. I believe the Col' 

* The Resolution appears on page 4 of this 
Bulletin. 



lege campus is on the way to lose much. 
The Summer School has been challenging 
to conformity, a symbol of wider inter- 
ests than ourselves, a recognition of what 
is going on outside our walls, a solidarity 
with the needs of our world and our 
time. The campus will lose the concrete 
evidence of these admirable things, but 
the essential Bryn Mawr College, alum- 
nae and students, need never lose them. 
This is a time for Bryn Mawr to show 
that our interest and concern was real 
and objective, not sentimental, that when 
the child of Bryn Mawr, as the Summer 
School is, believes itself ready to take on 
new responsibility, to make its own way, 
our interest does not flag nor fail, but 
rises, becomes at once more respectful and 
more concrete. Our actual connections 
will hardly be broken. I shall myself 
head a Board of Counsellors to work in 
connection with the new Summer School 
Board. On both Boards Bryn Mawr 
women will be asked to serve; regional 
committees will continue with the same 
make-up; undergraduates will still be 
chosen for the summer staff. The Sum- 
mer School will ask us all, faculty, alum- 
nae and students, to give to its new and 
courageous plan, sympathy, contributions 
of money and work. The new plan must 
be able to depend on its old income, 
much of which has come, as you know, 
from Bryn Mawr alumnae. I shall be able 
to tell you later, or Miss Carter will do it 
herself, more of the details. I say now 
that I trust that the interest always be- 
fore flowing from the College to the 
School will this spring be stronger and 
more generous as we see it taking its 
courage in its hands and striking out to 
reach more directly and effectively the 
purpose for which it was founded. 



[7] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



TRAINING IN PUBLIC WELFARE SERVICE 
NOW OFFERED BY THE COLLEGE 



TO meet the increasing demand for 
qualified workers in the field of 
community organisation for child 
welfare, the Carola WoerishofFer Depart- 
ment of Social Economy and Social Re- 
search is introducing this year a special 
graduate course in the division of Public 
Welfare Service. Twelve graduate stu- 
dents are enrolled in the seminar, which 
is under the direction of Dr. Hertha 
Kraus, Associate Professor in the depart- 
ment. Dr. Gustav Tugendreich, Research 
Associate, has joined the staff of the de- 
partment especially to assist with the 
projects in community organisation. His 
appointment was made possible through 
a special gift. In addition to providing 
expert leadership for the new course, the 
department granted four tuition scholar- 
ships to students desiring to participate 
in it. 

The seminar being given this year is 
part of a larger program designed to cover 
several years' work to be carried out by 
the faculty and a special research staff 
with the assistance of advanced graduate 
students and in co-operation with federal 
and state agencies. The technique of 
training now in use and in process of 
further development in the seminar on 
Studies in Community Organization for 
Child Welfare emphasises a quite new 
and different approach to the preparation 
of social workers for public service. The 
work is planned to meet both the standard 
requirements for professional social work 
training and the specific needs of the 
Social Security program in providing per- 
sonnel for the expanding child welfare 
agencies in small, semi-rural or undevel- 
oped communities, and in state, regional 
and county units. 

Federal and state government officials 



are observing the project with keen inter- 
est and are assisting actively in various 
phases of the work, which is virtually a 
pioneer venture in a new type of prepara- 
tion for public welfare positions. The 
whole emphasis on the community ap- 
proach is definitely a new development 
which is in contrast to the usual method 
of training social workers to view their 
profession predominantly from the indi- 
vidual case-work standpoint. The field of 
community organisation for public wel- 
fare is itself a comparatively new one, the 
importance of which has only recently 
been brought to the fore by the Federal 
and state security legislation of the past 
few years. Such legislation has greatly 
broadened the functions of public wel- 
fare agencies and challenged their realign- 
ment with private organisations in the 
field. 

For the first year the research project 
is concentrating on two definite objectives 
which are closely related. The first is the 
preparation of an educational exhibit 
which is to be used by the Pennsylvania 
Department of Welfare in its field work 
in rural communities. The second objec- 
tive is to develop a relatively simple 
standardised method of making county- 
wide surveys of community needs and of 
resources for welfare services for children. 

The purpose of the educational exhibit 
is to demonstrate to the people the needs 
and possibilities for child welfare services 
in their own community which may be 
developed through the co-operation and 
financial assistance of state and Federal 
agencies. The exhibit will be geared to 
the understanding of lay people and will 
be designed for use at county fairs, farm 
shows and other public exhibitions. It is 
important to stir up local interest in these 



[8] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



services because without the voluntary re- 
quest and active interest of the com- 
munity, local resources cannot be devel- 
oped and strengthened in accord with 
basic standards of social service. 

The development of a standardised 
method of making county-wide surveys of 
needs and resources for welfare services 
for children covers every stage of develop- 
ment from pre-natal care through to the 
age of twenty-one. Such a survey will 
express a comprehensive approach to the 
entire area of potential services and 
their possible co-ordination including the 
fields of health, recreation, personal coun- 
selling, vocational guidance. Montgomery 
County* is being used as the laboratory 
for developing survey methods and the re- 
sults obtained during the study are being 
turned over to the county. In expecta- 
tion of this result, co-operation between 
the State and County Boards of Public 
Assistance and the Carola Woerishoffer 
Department has been established by a re- 
cent decision to appoint one member of 
the staff in Montgomery County, also a 
student in the seminar, to serve as liaison 
agent between the County Board and the 
College. 

An essential feature of the plan for 
county surveys is the demonstration of 
the value of co-ordinating the efforts of 
private agencies and government services. 
The problem of the proper integration of 
health and welfare services offered by 
such agencies is a primary interest of Dr. 
Tugendreich. This has been his life work 
and he has written the standard textbook 
on the subject in Germany, translations 
of which are widely read. He is an in- 
ternational authority on the social aspects 
of public health service for children. It 
is interesting to note, in connection with 
this problem of integration, that the Fed- 



* The College is in Lower Merion Town- 
ship, Montgomery County. 

c 



eral Children's Bureau, which is helping 
the states to organise child welfare serv- 
ices, is stressing the need for just this 
kind of co-ordination as the basis of a 
desirable pattern for community organi- 
sation for child welfare. 

Close association of the county-wide 
field work with the library and statistical 
studies of the seminar provides the stu- 
dents with the community experience as 
well as affording a theoretical basis of 
training. An incidental but valuable fea- 
ture of the plan is that in addition to 
giving training and actual field work ex- 
perience to the students definite services 
are being rendered to the State of Penn- 
sylvania and to Montgomery County, as 
well as to the Council for Social Wel- 
fare—a federation of private agencies in 
the county — through the release of per- 
tinent results of surveys now in process 
to the various co-operating agencies. 

Last spring when the plans for the new 
course were disclosed following careful 
discussion in the department and consul- 
tation with the Government officials 
closely concerned, it was decided to form 
an advisory committee to help with the 
execution of the project and to guide the 
development of future activities. In as- 
sociation with Dr. Mildred Fairchild, 
Director of the department, and Dr. 
Kraus and Dr. Tugendreich, who are im- 
mediately concerned with the supervision 
of the work, this advisory committee 
meets from time to time with the gradu- 
ate students in the seminar. Included in 
the committee are key people in the Phil- 
adelphia region and experts connected 
with public and private agencies. Among 
them are Lillian Laser Strauss, 1909, and 
Dr. Lovett Dewees, Associate Physician 
to the College; Mrs. J. Henry Scatter- 
good and Dr. David Riesman, all of 
whom are well known to alumnae and 
former students of the College. 

9] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



AN INFORMAL ACCOUNT OF THE 
DIRECTORS' MEETING 



THE December meeting of the Board 
of Directors was held at the Deaiv 
ery with all five of the Alumnae 
Directors present. Just before the meet- 
ing we had met Mrs. Darrow at tea. 
After the routine business of electing the 
Board and its officers for the ensuing 
year, President Park gave her report. 
Most of her news items will be given by 
her directly and more fully to the Bul- 
letin. She told us of Mr. Fenwick's 
going to the Lima conference and the car- 
rying on of his work while he is away 
by Mr. Savage and Miss Staerk, his as- 
sistant; of the applications for sabbatical- 
year absences in 1939-1940 and of gifts 
to the College. The $10,000 from the 
Alumnae Association for Regional Schol- 
arships is no less appreciated than the 
gift of the girls themselves, who have 
been so wisely chosen that they appear to 
present fewer problems than the rest of 
the students. She described the little pub- 
licised raising of money for German refu- 
gee scholarships by an undergraduate and 
faculty committee and the adoption of 
their methods and plans later by other col- 
leges amid wide acclaim, told of the girls 
selected and their being placed in unused 
extra rooms in the College. She acknowl- 
edged Mr. Rhoads' gift which made pos- 
sible a correction of the curve of the road 
leading to the Deanery, gifts of books to 
the Library and Lecture Fund and two 
special gifts from friends and alumnae. 
Following the discussion at the October 
meeting of the choice of Commencement 
speaker and preacher, the two men 
selected, Mr. Charles Taft and Dr. Wil- 
lard Sperry, of the Harvard Divinity 
School, were invited and have accepted. 
A very interesting plan is being devel- 
oped for the Flexner lectures next year. 



The Summer School plans are not yet 
completed but the matter was referred to 
the Executive Board.* The President's 
report concluded with a mention of the 
death of two friends and benefactors of 
the College, Mr. Julius Goldman and 
Miss Elisa Ashbridge. 

The report of the faculty followed, 
giving the list of appointments of resident 
scholars. Then came the report of the 
Treasurer, Mr. Scattergood, who by his 
wise management of securities is able to 
offset somewhat the inevitable decrease 
in income faced these days by every in- 
stitution depending for income on in- 
vested moneys. It takes now $150,000 
of principal against $100,000 ten years 
ago to get an income of $4500 in the same 
type of securities. The sound financing 
of Rhoads Hall and the closeness of its 
cost to the estimated one are encourag- 
ing in spite of the funds still to be found 
to cover various general and necessary 
changes and improvements on the campus. 
There will be a lull in building now while 
Mr. Stokes is voyaging from the Cape to 
Cairo but in the hands of a special com- 
mittee the plans for the Library wing 
meanwhile will be polished to perfection. 

The Buildings and Grounds Committee 
made no formal report but informally we 
rejoiced with Mr. Stokes on the coal 
saved by the changes made in the heating 
system in spite of there being three extra 
buildings to heat and light — Wyndham, 
the Science Building and Rhoads. 

The Library Committee's report brought 
out the need for a greater number of 
books for current use as a result of an in- 
crease in the number of students. Perhaps 



* A statement of the final action in regard 
to the Summer School will be found on page 
4 of this issue. 



[10] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



we have tended to think chiefly of the 
food and living space of the extra fresh- 
men and need to face more directly now 
the added requirements not only for 
books but for athletic facilities and infir' 
mary equipment. 

Two matters of new business came up. 
One was the question of whether the 
readers of the Bulletin would be inter' 
ested in this sort of report of what hap' 
pens in the Directors 1 meetings. Possibly 
the reaction to such a sample as this will 
give us the answer. The second was the 
desire of the alumnae for more publicity 
trips throughout the country undertaken 
by a representative of the College. The 



experiment of the past year has proved 
so successful that it is hoped some per' 
manent arrangement can be made. 

As always the December meeting was 
followed by a dinner given by Miss Park 
and while we drank our coffee the choir 
sang Christmas carols to us. And so to 
bed and, for the Alumnae Directors, to 
the Deanery Committee meeting early in 
the morning. 

Presented by the Alumnae Directors 

Eleanor Little Aldrich, 1905. 

Mary Alden Morgan Lee, 1912. 

Adelaide W.' Neall, 1906. 

Ethel C. Dunham, 1914. 

Eleanor Marquand Forsyth, 1919. 



NEWS FROM THE DISTRICTS 



DISTRICT VI. 



LUCY HARRIS CLARKE, 1917, 
writes from Wichita, Kansas: 

"For years I have felt that there 
was nothing that our little group of Bryn 
Mawr alumnae could do to help the 
College. But now that there are fifty 
women working together in the Seven 
Colleges Club with a similar point of 
view on academic matters, I am hopeful 
that Bryn Mawr may benefit. 

"Our Club was organized last spring 
especially for social purposes. It was not 
long, however, before we felt the urge to 
promote interest in our various institU' 
tions and so we gave a tea for potential 
undergraduates. 

"As the Club came more and more 
into the public eye, inquiries began to 
pour in about the entrance requirements. 
So we appointed an Educational Com- 
mittee and all such questions are now 
referred to its Chairman. The Commit- 
tee has tabulated in simple form the En- 
trance Requirements of the Seven 
Women's Colleges and sent copies of this 

E 



table to the high and intermediate schools. 

"As we studied the college preparatory 
courses we became aware of some fla- 
grantly weak spots. First of all, algebra 
is not offered until the second year of 
high school in Wichita. We now have 
a petition signed by forty-four parents 
who want their children to take an op' 
tional course in algebra in the ninth grade 
next year, i. e., first year of high school. 

"The scholarships at the Seven Col- 
leges available to girls in Wichita are 
now being tabulated, and when arranged 
in chart form will be sent to the schools 
for reference. 

"We are planning to release in April 
a lot of publicity about the Colleges in 
the hope of interesting students at the 
time of year when they are planning their 
next winter's courses. 

"In closing, I want to urge other small 
groups of Bryn Mawr alumnae to join 
with alumnae of the other women's col- 
leges. We never could have accomplished 
alone what the Seven Colleges Club has." 

11] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



THE ALUMNAE BOOKSHELF 



MANY VOICES. By Helen Wieand 
Cole. Henry Harrison, New York. 

TO the reader these poems seem to 
speak not in many voices, but in 
one. The spirit throughout the book 
is the same, and the pages from first to 
last convey a feeling of serenity, faith, 
and resignation. Mrs. Cole writes from 
a point of view consistent throughout, 
whatever her subject. She sees people 
with insight and sympathy, natural 
scenes with appreciation, the problems of 
life with the acceptance of experience 
and of faith in divine goodness. The 
book thus presents a uniform impression 
which, if monotonous, is pleasing and 
restful. 

The verse is for the most part simple 
and melodious. Mrs. Cole uses a variety 
of forms, showing preference for the son' 
net and the three-line stanza. Her 
rhythms are never awkward and fre- 
quently very musical. Her use of words 
is almost without exception undistin- 
guished. The greatest fault is perhaps the 
constant use of words so worn by poetic 
repetition that they no longer bear any 
particular meaning. Indeed the poems 
show often the curious combination of the 
thought and philosophy of an adult, who 
has lived and understood the good and 
bad of life, with the naive expression of 
a young poet who has not yet learned to 
weight every word with individual mean- 
ing. This lack of intensity of expression 
— though intensity of feeling cannot be 
doubted — is not visible everywhere, how 
ever. La Veuve shows a clear and tragic 
picture. Odessius to 7<[ausicaa is painted 
with most real, though tenderly delicate 
shades. But on the whole the poems are 
done in half tones, on muted strings, 
sweet, peaceful, traditional. 

Josephine Young Case, 1928. 



STARS OVER THE SCHOOLHOUSE. 
The Evolution of a College Dean. 
By Eleanor L. Lord. Richard R. Smith, 
New York. 

TO the Bryn Mawr reader neither 
the title nor the subtitle of this book 
is likely to mean as much as an 
introduction as the plate opposite page 
42 with pictures of college gates at Smith, 
Bryn Mawr, and Cambridge, England. 
In the foreword the author says of the 
work that it was written ". . . in the 
hope that these recollections of an educa- 
tional experience covering three decades 
of the late- Victorian age and as many 
more in the twentieth century may be of 
interest as illustrating some aspects of 
cultural evolution in an unbroken 
sequence from the then to the now." 
This general interest the Bryn Mawr 
reader can share with other members of 
a wider public, but her special interest 
will be in the chapters dealing with life 
at Bryn Mawr and at Smith, Newnham 
and Goucher. 

The first three chapters give a pleasant 
picture of a New England childhood, of 
"school days in the seventies," and of 
high school study at a time when a thor- 
ough grounding in Latin and Greek was 
still accepted as the proper preparation 
for admission to college. The chapter on 
"College Life at Smith in the Eighties 11 
exhibits this life as an amusing combina- 
ton of some customs that the college girl 
today accepts as naturally as did her 
mother and grandmother and of others 
that she would regard as most quaintly 
"dated. 11 Two years of high school teach- 
ing — and strenuous years they must have 
been — followed Miss Lord's graduation 
from Smith. The fall of 1889 found her 
enrolled as Fellow in History at Bryn 
Mawr. 



[12] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 






The chapter about graduate study at 
Bryn Mawr is introduced by a quotation 
from Professor Shorey's Manes Bryn- 
mawrensium, and depicts life in the 
heroic days of 1889-1890 and in 1895- 
1896 when Miss Lord returned for a sec- 
ond year of study for the doctor's degree. 
The interval between 1890 and 1895 she 
spent teaching at Smith and studying in 
London and Cambridge. According to 
her own account she had gone to Bryn 
Mawr in the first place with no thought 
of working for a higher degree or of 
college teaching. The change of plan and 
ambition that followed a first year of 
graduate work Miss Thomas must have 
heartily approved. 

In 1910 Miss Lord gave up her work 
as a full-time college teacher of history 
to accept an appointment at Goucher 
College as Dean and head of the Depart- 
ment of History. The chapter on her 
work as a Dean gives an excellent ac- 
count of the evolution from very informal 
beginnings of an administrative organi- 
zation with its various provisions for aca- 
demic supervision, co-operation with a 
student government association, vocational 
advising, the standardization of marks, etc. 

The later chapters describe different 
educational projects and movements in 
which Miss Lord was interested at one 
period or another. The description of a 
year spent as Warden at Bryn Mawr is 
entitled "The Saga of. a Warden whose 
Duties were to have been purely Social." 
At this time it was not the work of dis- 
tinguished professors but that of Lucy of 
Rockefeller Hall — Lucy remembered and 
loved by two decades of students — which 
won Miss Lord's grateful appreciation. 

The numerous illustrations included in 
the volume — the first is of the author at 
eight and the last of her garden today — 
add not a little to its charm. 

Mary L. Coolidge, 1914. 



[13 



CITYWARD MIGRATION, Swedish 
Data. By Jane Moore. University of 
Chicago Press. 1938. Pp. xix, 140. 

SWEDEN offers many areas for social 
observation. Among the less spectac- 
ular are Sweden's full and accurate 
statistics. From this data studies can be 
made that have validity far beyond her 
borders. This book is such a study. The 
methods are as meticulous as physics 
would apply to a problem in gravity and 
the conclusions hold out a promise of 
social prediction. It is not the kind of 
book that one reads for amusement or 
general instruction as in the case of many 
books about Sweden. We do have, how- 
ever, the presentation of a problem, a 
careful method, and conclusions. The 
problem is to measure the pull of a city 
under varying conditions as compared to 
the varying pulls of native environment. 
The census figures with their unusual 
completeness furnish the material for 
analysis. The city is Stockholm; the locale 
from which the migration takes place 
a county with both agricultural and in- 
dustrial environment. There is a com- 
parison of the pulls of both these areas 
toward Stockholm and the result is clear 
that the rural migrants go first to the 
smaller industrial centers. The propor- 
tion of those who go direct and of those 
who stop on the way seems to be rela- 
tively constant. The behaviour patterns of 
the source of origin and the adjustment 
in the city are related to the factors of 
distance, culture level and sex. The two 
closing chapters of the book show the 
wider significance of the study: 'There 
has been pressure brought for some time 
on the United States census to include 
questions concerning mobility in the next 
decennial census. The results of the study 
of migration in Sweden, of which this 
study is only part, should help formulate 

] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



the aims in the collection of new data and 
indicate the extensiveness of the informa- 
tion required to give more clear-cut an' 
swers to the problems of distance, direc- 
tion, and numbers involved in the migra- 
tion process. 

"The application of the particular re- 
suits of this study to any practical prob- 
lems arising from the desire to evacuate 
population from poor lands or from areas 
with low standards of living would be to 
point out that the economic lure alone 
must not be considered but the previous 
type of material environment of the 
group must be taken into account. There- 
fore a program for the direction of migra- 
tion should see that the new areas chosen 
for population movement represent a 
material environment not only of eco- 
nomic promise but similar to the old 
areas of residence, so that old habits, 
knowledge, or ignorance will not hinder 
the movement of population into these 
areas or the success of adaptation. For, 
probably, the new inventions, or new 
conditions must not differ too much from 
the former ones if rapid adaptation is 
expected." 

Herbert Adolphus Miller, 

Lecturer in Sociology, 
Bryn 'M.awr College. 

THE OLD HOUSE REMEMBERS and 
SMALL TOWN PORTRAITS. By 

Constance Deming Lewis. The Kaleido- 
graph Press, Dallas, Texas. $1.50. 1938. 



WITH 
hers, 



The Old House Remeni' 
Mrs. Lewis has followed 
her former book of verses, More 
Than Water Bro\en. One might describe 



her poems in terms of paintings, as di- 
vided into portraits, flower-studies, and 
landscapes. Line Drawings in a Hospital 
are portraits, excellently expressed. "Scrub 
Woman" is chosen for quotation: 

Colourless as the drab walls and ceiling, 
Preceded by the faint odour of dis- 
infectants, 
She slides with muted clatter 
Wiping endless miles of clean linoleum. 

"Spring," from J^ew England Hillside 
Pasture, recalls Japanese five-lined verses 
in its dexterous economy: 

Pale blue, 

The violets 

Slope down the field 

Across green meadow land singing 

With brooks. 

Mrs. Lewis' sense of the desperate 
beauty of a moment, gone 'ere one can 
grasp it, shows in the sonnet "Weird 
Alloy," of which the octave is given here : 

Those things are beautiful which can't 
remain — 
The lifting curve of swallows swift 

in flight, 

The purple dusk dissolving into night, 

The fleeting silver of the hills in rain, 

The hollow wave where now a gull has 

lain, 

The poplar trees shivering in yellow 

fright, 
The distant calling of a brown bob- 
white, 
Making all consciousness exquisite as 
pain. 

These poignant recollections of pain or 
beauty compel the reader's interest and 
gratitude. 

Beatrice MacGeorge, 1901. 






[14] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



NEWS OF FACULTY AND ALUMNAE 






DR. RHYS CARPENTER, of the 
Department of Classical Archaeol' 
ogy, aroused great interest dis- 
cussing "The Greek West" in a four-part 
symposium on the Frontiers of Hellenic 
Civilization at the joint meeting of the 
American Philological Association and 
the Archaeological Institute of America, 
held in Providence the end of December. 
He drew no modern parallels but his 
hearers found them in his discussion of 
the block of Greece's westward expan- 
sion as contrasted with the ease with 
which she spread toward the East. The 
Greeks did make trips to the western end 
of the Mediterranean six centuries before 
Christ, but the Carthaginian-Etruscan 
alliance ended the flow of her culture in 
this direction. 



Henrietta Jennings, 1922, has just won 
an essay prise of $1000 awarded by the 
Consumer Credit Institute of America, 
Inc. Nearly two years ago the Consumer 
Credit Institute of America, Inc., an- 
nounced an essay contest for manuscripts 
of book-length on any subject in the field 
of consumer credit. It was with this con- 
test in mind that she started her work on 
'The Development of Personal Loan De- 
partments 11 by commercial banks and trust 
companies. The judges were members of 
the advisory council of the Institute: Dr. 
Charles O. Hardy of the Brookings In- 
stitution, Professor Ernest Minor Patter- 
son of the Wharton School of Finance 
of the University of Pennsylvania and 
Professor Raymond Rogers of the School 
of Commerce of New York University. 



demic year. Mr. Willoughby will be in 
charge of the department in his absence, 
and will be assisted by Miss Katharine 
Wolff and Miss Florence Fraser (Mrs. 
William B. Mudge, Jr.). Mr. Alwyne 
was married to Miss Mildred Avery of 
Swarthmore on December 15th, and they 
are spending the year abroad. Mr. Al- 
wyne hopes, while they are in the East, 
to give special attention to Oriental music. 



Katharine Van Bibber, 1924, who has 
been assistant to the Headmistress and 
teacher of Mathematics and Physics at 
the Brearley School in New York, has 
just been appointed Headmistress of the 
Bryn Mawr School in Baltimore. 



Dr. Hertha Kraus, of the Department 
of Social Economy, has been invited to 
be a member of the Committee on Social 
Aspects of Public Housing of the Na- 
tional Conference of Social Work for 
the coming year. She is also a member 
of the American Section of the Interna- 
tional Conference of Social Work, to be 
held in Belgium in 1940, and has been 
asked to be a member of the Co-ordinat- 
ing Committee for Student Refugees, 
formed under the direction of the Insti- 
tute for International Education. 



Professor Horace Alwyne, of the De- 
partment of Music, has been granted 
leave of absence for the rest of the aca- 

[15 



Dr. Ernst Dies, of the History of 
Art Department, has loaned his collec- 
tion of Chinese Paintings to be exhibited 
at the Bryn Mawr Art Centre during 
the month of January. Most of the 
paintings are of Taoist figures, but there 
are also landscape scrolls and paintings 
of birds and flowers, by modern Chinese 
artists, as well as pictures from earlier 
periods. 

] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Carl Fischer, Inc., Music Publishers, 
New York, have accepted for publica- 
tion five arrangements of church music 
made by Mr. Willoughby, of the Depart- 
ment of Music, for the College Choir. 
These arrangements will start a series of 
musical publications to be known as the 
Bryn Mawr College Choral Series. 



The Department of Geology has ar- 
ranged A Symposium on the Problems of 
the Crystalline Roc\s of the Piedmont. 
The seven speakers are the outstanding 
people in this field in the whole country. 
Among them are two alumnae: Anna I. 
Jonas Stose, 1904, and Eleanora Bliss 
Knopf, 1904, and the Mary Paul Collins 
Scholar, Anna Hietanen, of the Univer- 
sity of Helsingfors. The series of meet- 
ings will be held during February and 
anyone who is interested is cordially in* 
vited to attend. 



Katharine Neilson, 1924, has just had 
published by the Harvard University 
Press a critical study of Filippino Lippi, 
which has had admirable reviews. 



Katharine Blodgett, 1917, Associate of 
Dr. Irving Langmuir, is the discoverer 
of a coating four-millionths of an inch 
thick which will make glass invisible and 
cause a loss of only about 1 % of light. 

Ordinary thicknesses become clear as 
air, and reveal how much human eyes 
have been missing in looking through 
even the finest glass. Purest glass trans- 
mits about 92% of light, as compared 
with more than 99% with the new coat- 
ing. A coated pane is visible only by its 
dimly-outlined edges. . . . 

New feats in photography seem pos- 
sible. Normally a camera lens cuts out 



[16 



8% of light. With some better types of 
cameras, using three or four lenses, this 
means a loss of 25% to 35% of the light 
reaching the plate. Coated lenses would 
give that much increase in light. 

An incredibly thin film on both sur- 
faces of glass is the secret of this scientific 
miracle. The film is about four millionths 
of an inch, or one-quarter the wave-length 
of light in thickness. 

Dr. Blodgett's work at the General 
Electric Company's research laboratory is 
an example of "pure" science, which 
seems not to have the remotest practical 
value, suddenly doing something revolu- 
tionary. The impractical thing was find- 
ing that an oily film a single molecule 
thick can be spread on the surface of 
water. 

This discovery was made by Dr. Irving 
Langmuir, of the General Electric Co., 
winner of the Nobel Prise in chemistry. 
He and Dr. Blodgett found that by dip- 
ping a piece of glass through the floating 
film, the single-molecule layer would 
transfer to the solid surface. Each dip 
adds one layer. Glass is dipped usually 
forty- four times to build the thickness of 
a quarter wave-length of light. 

The scientific world was incredulous 
when Dr. Langmuir first announced the 
mono-molecule films. However, he dem- 
onstrated their reality by their color 
changes, which showed that reflected 
light was broken up in the films, like rays 
which give the iridescence to the wings 
of a beetle. 

This fact was applied practically by 
Dr. Blodgett. Films one-quarter of a wave- 
length thick are just right to cause the 
crest of one wave to overlap the trough 
of another as the light tries to reflect. 
The result is cancellation of wave motion, 
and without wave motion there is no 
light. This cancellation of reflection does 
not, however, result in any loss of light. 

] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



UNDERGRADUATE NOTES 

By EMILY CHENEY, 1940 



AS the College year swings into what 
is usually supposed to be its gloomi- 
est session, the winter period, 
undergraduates seem to be keeping the 
wolf from the door: a round of lectures 
on current affairs, the new entertainment 
series, controversies aroused in the l\[ews 
and the Lantern, all serve to keep stu- 
dents on the jump. Although it is not 
yet possible to get statistical evidence, 
there are also signs that the trends in 
choices of the major field are shifting, 
and certainly students are becoming more 
critically aware of the educational sys- 
tem around them. 

Comprehensive examinations in all 
fields are now fully established and their 
influence grows year by year. As far 
back as October, seniors could be found 
reviewing and re- outlining their freshman 
notes, and because of warnings from har- 
assed seniors, juniors and even a few 
thoughtful sophomores, are beginning to 
plot their work more carefully. Like most 
reforms, the comprehensive system has 
brought in its wake demands for further 
changes. An editorial in the K[ews sug- 
gested the need for extension of the sys- 
tem. It recommended that the kind of 
advanced work now open to seniors 
should be preceded and prepared for in 
the other three years by a program of 
"more prepared class discussions, more 
papers, and fewer quizes, and perhaps 
independent work something like honours 
in the junior year." 

After having its largest year on record 
in 1936, with eighteen majors, the his- 
tory department now seems to be drawing 
slightly fewer students, with a prospec- 
tive nine to eleven in 1940. This change 
may perhaps be accounted for by the fact 
that the new sociology department has 



already seven majors this year, while eco- 
nomics and politics seem to be growing 
steadily, though with yearly fluctuations. 
The number of science majors is increas- 
ing and will probably grow even more 
rapidly with the new enlarged facilities. 
Several science courses have begun to ex- 
periment with open-book examinations, 
and for the first time this year one chem- 
istry student will take a laboratory exam- 
ination as one of her three comprehen- 
sives. One remaining fact of interest is 
offered without explanation, open to any- 
one's theory: in the Class of 1941 (now 
sophomores) there are thirty tentative 
registrations in the English department. 

The interest in current affairs has been 
developing throughout the year at what 
seems to us an unprecedented rate. The 
entirely different discussion of the recent 
German-Csech crisis by two visiting lec- 
turers, Raymond Gram Swing and Miss 
Elisabeth Wiskemann, helped to stir the 
campus into interest and controversy. 
This initial impetus has been followed up 
along many divergent lines. A serious 
and well-documented article, entitled 
"Communism and the United Front," ap- 
peared in the Lantern — a Lantern which, 
incidentally, went far to justify its prom- 
ises of rejuvenation. The Peace Day res- 
olutions were voted on by a larger num- 
ber of students than before, and have 
been followed by letters to the J\[ews, 
both pro and con. A radical minority 
group advocated a more advanced stand 
than the resolutions, while the 1<[ews, 
breaking its traditional silence on politics, 
took issue with them, and in part with 
the resolutions, in an editorial entitled 
"Peace — or Democracy." 

The campus has also responded more 
enthusiastically than usual to the Peace 



[17] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Chest drive for Spanish and Chinese re' 
lief, and in particular to the drive for 
two German Refugee Scholarships. The 
latter was adequately subscribed within a 
week, and more funds were received later. 
On the cultural side, the campus is 
enjoying the entertainment series, of 
which Myra Hess and Carl Sandburg are 
among those yet to come. Outside of the 
series, we were also extremely fortunate 
to be able to hear Kreisler play in Good- 
hart recently, while extra-curricular ac- 
tivities, such as the theatre group, the art 
club, and the new string ensemble, led 
by Helen Rice, 1923, Warden of Rhoads, 
are drawing more and more interest. All 
this, of course, does not go on without 
the usual recurrent murmurs from stu- 
dents that there is not sufficient time to 
do both their academic work and to take 
in the many outside activities. Actually, 
the number of the latter do seem to have 
increased, in actual number as well as in 
the wideness of their appeal. In addi- 
tion, each spring the seniors have voiced 
their need for extra time in which to 
study for comprehensives. And last, 



plans for big May Day are already be- 
ginning to loom up — particularly in the 
minds of next year's Senior Class. All 
in all, it seems possible that undergradu- 
ates soon may be reluctantly forced to 
advocate a longer year. 

The growing press for time may per- 
haps be connected with the growth of 
the undergraduate body. We do not 
mean to imply that 500 students, because 
of general wear and tear, need more time 
to get through an ordinary year's work 
than would 400 students. But the larger 
number swells every extra-curricular ac- 
tivity and academic department, with a 
resulting gain in enthusiasm. 

At any rate, it seems to us natural 
that when the College is embarked on a 
building program, including a new 
Library wing, the Theatre Workshop, 
and perhaps squash courts, there should 
be a corresponding response in interest 
from the undergraduates. This response 
seems to us to show itself in an expansion 
of extra-curricular activities, not so much 
by an increase in their number, as by a 
rejuvenation of those already existing. 



DEANERY NOTES 



A LTHOUGH the month of December 
AA is a short one for the College, the 
Deanery found itself as busy as 
ever. It was kept open during the entire 
holidays, and served many luncheons to 
the Faculty who were still on the campus 
during the whole week before Christmas. 
At Christmas-time itself there were many 
outsiders — alumnae, friends of alumnae 
and neighbors — who came and stayed, 
and apparently enjoyed their visit so 
much that they want to return another 
year. The Deanery was very pleased to 
have them, and hopes very much that 
they will come back again. 



[18 



The Christmas spirit was most evident, 
even to the extent of a lovely Christmas 
tree in the lounge, and with decorations 
everywhere. One extremely interesting 
thing was the procession of small animals 
underneath the tree. These fascinating and 
unusual creatures were discovered stored 
away in the Deanery with other of Miss 
Thomas's possessions, and for several 
years now have been used in this manner. 
We feel it is the beginning of a charming 
tradition, and hope they will continue to 
be among the decorations each year. 

The Executive Committee of the Chi- 
nese Scholarship Fund met December 13th 

] 






BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



at the Deanery, and on December 15th 
President Park gave a dinner for the 
Directors of the College. After dinner 
the choir sang Christmas carols in its cus' 
tomary delightful manner. 

On Sunday, January 8th, the Senior 
Class was invited by the mother of one of 
the members of the class to luncheon to 
meet Eleanor Mercein and to hear her 
talk about the Basque country, which she 
knows so well, and which she has made 



familiar to all her readers in her delight' 
ful books. Adelaide Neall, 1906, an 
Alumnae Director of the College, had 
generously made the lecture possible. The 
Deanery always is the ideal setting for a 
gathering of this kind where there is a 
delightful combination of formality and 
informality and the big room never looks 
more attractive than when it is filled with 
students who have come with the pleasant 
sense of there being an "occasion." 

D. G. F., 1932. 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



Tuesday, February 7th — 8.30 p.m., Goodhart Hall 

Myra Hess will give a Piano Recital as the third event in the College Entertainment 

Committee Series. 

Tickets: $3.00, $2.50, $2.00 and $1.50. 

Thursday, February 9th — 8.30 p.m., Deanery 

Doctor Ruth Underhil! will speak on American Indian Poetry, an analysis of the form 
and content of poetry among different Indian groups, under the auspices of the Department 
of Social Economy. 

Sunday, February 12th — 7.30 p.m., Music Room, Goodhart Hall 

Service conducted by the Reverend John R. Hart, Assistant to the Chaplain at West Point 
and Consulting Lecturer and Psychologist of the Valley Forge Chapel, Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. 



Thursday, February 16th — 8.30 p.m., Gymnasium 



Douglas Kennedy, Director of the English Folk Dance and Song Society, 
talk and direct the Students in Folk Dances. 



give an informal 



Sunday, February 19th — 4.30 p.m., Deanery 

Afternoon of Chamber Music by a String Quartet of which Helen Rice, 1923, Warden of 
Rhoads Hall, is a member. 

Sundays, February 19th and February 26th — 7.30 p.m., Music Room, Goodhart Hall 

Services conducted by the Reverend Donald B. Aldrich, Rector of the Church of the 
Ascension, New York, New York. 

Mondays, February 20th and February 27th — 8.20 p.m., Goodhart Hall 

Third and fourth of the series of lectures on the Historical Development of the Constitutional 
Powers by Judge Florence E. Allen of the United States Circuit Court of Appeals, under the 
Anna Howard Shaw Memorial Foundation. 

Thursday, February 23rd — 8.30 p.m., Goodhart Hall 

Martha Graham and her group will give a Dance Recital as the fourth event in the College 
Entertainment Committee Series. 
Tickets: $3.00, $2.50, $2.00 and $1.50. 



Saturday, February 25th — 8.30 p.m., 

Freshman Show — "Deep in a Dream.' 
Tickets: $1.00. 



Goodhart Hal 



[19] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE ASKS FOR ALUMNAE 
OPINION ABOUT PHI BETA KAPPA 



AT the Annual Meeting of the Bryn 
/■A Mawr Alumnae Association in the 
spring of 1937, the Academic 
Committee was asked to study the ques- 
tion of alumnae feeling regarding the pos- 
sible introduction of Phi Beta Kappa at 
Bryn Mawr. In response to this request, 
the Committee prepared and submitted to 
three hundred former "Upper Ten" mem- 
bers a questionnaire on the subject, and 
from its results prepared a report to the 
Alumnae Association, submitted at the 
Annual Meeting of 1938 (and subse- 
quently printed in the July number of 
the Alumnae Bulletin). At this meet- 
ing the Alumnae Association asked that 
the Academic Committee continue its 
study of the question, extending the field 
of inquiry beyond those who might pre- 
sumably have been eligible to Phi Beta 
Kappa, to the large body of Bryn Mawr 
alumnae. 

The Committee therefore asks all alum- 
nae to express their opinion about the 
advisability of requesting the College to 
consider the introduction of Phi Beta 
Kappa at Bryn Mawr by answering the 
questionnaire printed below. The an- 
swers will be tabulated and the results 
given at the Annual Meeting of 1939, 
to be passed on to the College by the 
Alumnae Association, if it so desires. It 
will be readily understood that any action 
regarding the introduction of Phi Beta 
Kappa lies with the College, and that the 
record of alumnae feeling in the matter 
may simply be handed over to the College 
for its information. 

The Academic Committee feels that 
the problem of introducing a chapter of 
Phi Beta Kappa at Bryn Mawr must be 
regarded from two different angles. First, 
what would the effect be internally on 



the present organisation of the College 
and of the undergraduate body? Second, 
how would it affect the relation of the 
College and its graduates to the rest of 
the world? 

Some points which may well be noted 
are the following: At present students 
can take their degrees with three different 
types of honours in the general field and 
with distinction in the major subject. 
Some of the Bryn Mawr faculty ques- 
tion the wisdom of adding another pos- 
sible distinction, as they feel that such 
things tend to lay too much stress on 
marks and mechanical evaluations, in- 
stead of encouraging the students to work 
because they are interested. Another 
point with which alumnae of Bryn Mawr 
may not be familiar is the way in which 
Phi Beta Kappa is awarded. New mem- 
bers are chosen by Phi Beta Kappa mem- 
bers, not by the faculty as a whole, as is 
the case in the award of the other distinc' 
tions. This raises a question as to whether 
introducing such a closed group within 
the College is not against the policy and 
tradition of the College in avoiding all 
societies with any resemblance to the 
sorority system. On the other hand, it 
has been urged that the intellectual tra- 
dition of Phi Beta Kappa gives it an 
entirely different character. 

In order to facilitate the consideration 
of these questions, the following report 
on the 1938 questionnaire is reprinted 
from the July Bulletin: 

REPRINT OF REPORT 

The following questionnaire has been 
prepared and sent to three hundred 
"Upper Ten 11 members: 

1. What, if any, advantage or disad- 
vantage has the absence of Phi Beta 



[20] 



BRYN MAWll ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Kappa brought to you personally 
and to your Bryn Mawr friends? 

2. What advantages or disadvantages 
do you consider would accrue to 
future Bryn Mawr graduates if 
there were a chapter of Phi Beta 
Kappa at Bryn Mawr? 

3. Would the existence of Phi Beta 
Kappa at Bryn Mawr, in your 
opinion, in any way affect the gen' 
eral value of the Bryn Mawr de- 
gree of Bachelor of Arts? 

4. What cases do you know where 
Phi Beta Kappa has been of sub' 
stantial value to its individual mem- 
bers (men or women)? 

The second meeting of your Committee 
was held in Connecticut on April 30th 
and May 1st of this year (1938), and at 
it the completed questionnaires received 
from approximately 200 former "Upper 
Ten" members were read and discussed, 
and their information and opinions tab' 
ulated. 

First, it may be stated that more 
numerous reasons, given by a large num' 
ber of people, showed advantages that 
would accrue, rather than disadvantages, 
from the introduction of Phi Beta Kappa 
at Bryn Mawr. Those advantages most 
frequently noted were the following: 

1. A very small group felt the pres' 
tige of the College would be in' 
creased. 

2. A larger group felt that the award 
of Phi Beta Kappa would give 
simple and convenient proof of 
good scholarship. 

3. The larger number (about one-half 
of the responses) of comments 
stressing the advantages spoke of 
economic and professional advan' 
tages (or removal of disadvan' 
tages) to the individual who would 
receive the distinction. 

4. A small but interesting group of 
comments stressed the fact that 
Bryn Mawr's reputation for intel- 
lectual snobbery would be lessened 
by its willingness to join with other 
institutions in this matter. Another 



group brought out the obligation of 
the College to further the solidar- 
ity of scholarly groups, and the 
potential advantage to the College 
of this solidarity; while a similar 
group noted the possible interest of 
the Society's meetings. 

Of the number noting disadvantages — 

1. The largest group, somewhat over 
one-tenth, feared that the holders 
of a degree, not receiving Phi Beta 
Kappa, would suffer loss of pres- 
tige, or that the degree would come 
to be of less value as a relative 
distinction. 

2. Another group, again somewhat 
over one-tenth, noted dangers of 
working for marks, and of depend- 
ing on labels rather than on actual 
merit. 

In analysing the results of the ques- 
tionnaire, your Committee notes in the 
answers received the large proportion of 
non-committal replies, and the tentative 
and judicial tone of the vast majority of 
these answers. The instances were very 
few indeed in which emotional fervour 
was expressed either pro or con. A very 
small group felt definitely that they had 
suffered a professional handicap on ac- 
count of the lack of Phi Beta Kappa. 
An even smaller group felt that the dis- 
advantages in Phi Beta Kappa to the 
College or to the individual were real. 
Of those deciding one way or another a 
definite majority favoured joining on ac' 
count of possible advantages that might 
ensue to future graduates. However, the 
group expressed this opinion in moderate 
terms. 

On page 22 is printed a list of questions 
addressed to each alumna of the College. 
The Committee will welcome its return, 
especially if the answers can be accom- 
panied by a statement indicating any ad- 
ditional points which the members of the 
Association feel should be considered in 
gathering as much data as possible for 
presentation at the Annual Meeting of 
1939. 



[21] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 

ACADEMIC COMMITTEE QUESTIONNAIRE 

1. What, if any, advantages or disadvantages has the absence of Phi Beta Kappa, 
in your opinion, brought to Bryn Mawr graduates? 

2. What advantages or disadvantages do you consider would accrue to future Bryn 
Mawr graduates if there were a chapter of Phi Beta Kappa at Bryn Mawr? 

3. Would the existence of Phi Beta Kappa at Bryn Mawr, in your opinion, in any 
way affect the general value of the Bryn Mawr degree of Bachelor of Arts? 

4. What cases do you know where Phi Beta Kappa has been of substantial value 
to its individual members (men or women)? 

5. Do you feel that membership in Phi Beta Kappa is a reliable measure of later 
achievement in scholarship? 

Place Date 

Name Class 

Present Occupation 

This questionnaire should be returned to Louise Dillingham, Chairman of the 
Academic Committee, c/o the Alumnae Office, The Deanery, Bryn Mawr College. 



A LETTER TO THE EDITOR 



To the Editor of the 

Alumnae Bulletin: 

YOUR editorial in the January issue 
was both arresting and timely. Since 
women now control a fair portion 
of the world's wealth, it behooves them 
to plan wisely for its ultimate disposal. 
There would seem to be- no more worth' 
while object than the education of their 
own sex, yet we read in the newspapers 
over and over again of bequests made by 
women to men's colleges. In the case of 
unmarried women without even the ex' 
cuse of "leaving my husband's money to 
his college" this is as distressing as it is 
inexplicable. Who will provide funds to 
educate women if they themselves do 
not? Certainly not the men, except in an 



occasional, notable instance — the gener- 
ous-hearted, far-seeing Mr. Dwight Mor- 
row bequeathed equal sums to his own 
and his wife's college. We alumnae of 
women's colleges must feel a special 
responsibility and realise that, under 
rapidly changing conditions, the whole 
future of these privately endowed insti- 
tutions may depend upon our taking 
thought of them. It should encourage 
Bryn Mawr alumnae to be told that even 
humble amounts can be of service to their 
College. So I thank you for calling at- 
tention to this matter of such vital inter- 
est and importance to us all. 

Eleanor Little Aldrich, 1905. 
A letter approving the change in the 
Form of Bequest was also received from 
Anna Lawther, 1897. 



[22] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 

CLASS NOTES 

Letters sent to a Class Collector, care of the Alumnae Office, 
will be promptly forwarded. 



DOCTORS OF PHILOSOPHY 

MASTERS OF ART 

FORMER GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Editor: Vesta M. Sonne 
Radnor Hall 
Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Class Collector for Doctors of Philosophy: 
Marion R. Stoll 

Class Collector for Masters of Art and 
Graduate Students: 
Helen Lowengrund Jacoby 
(Mrs. George Jacoby) 

1889 

Class Editor: Sophia Weygandt Harris 

(Mrs. John McA. Harris) 

105 W. Walnut Lane, Germantown, Pa. 
Class Collector: Martha G. Thomas 

1890 
No Editor Appointed 
Class Collector: Elizabeth Harris Keiser 
(Mrs. Edward H. Keiser) 

1891 
No Editor Appointed 
Class Collector: Lilian Sampson Morgan 
(Mrs. T. H. Morgan) 

1892 

Class Editor and Class Collector: 

Edith Wetherill Ives (Mrs. F. M. Ives) 
28 East 70th Street, New York, N. Y. 

1893 

Class Editor: Susan Walker FitzGerald 
(Mrs. Richard Y. FitzGerald) 
7 Greenough Ave., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Class Collector: Elizabeth Nichols Moores 
(Mrs. Charles W. Moores) 

1894 

Class Editor and Class Collector: 
Abby Brayton Durfee 
(Mrs. Randall N. Durfee) 
19 Highland Ave., Fall River, Mass. 

1895 

Class Editor: Susan Fowler 

420 W. 118th St., New York City 

Class Collector: Elizabeth Bent Clark 
(Mrs. Herbert Lincoln Clark) 



1896 

Class Editor: Abigail Camp Dimon 

1411 Genesee St., Utica, New York 

Class Collector: Ruth Furness Porter 
(Mrs. James F. Porter) 

On Friday, December 2nd, at the Barclay 
Hotel in New York City, the new home of 
the Bryn Mawr Club, thirteen members of 
1896 met at dinner to welcome Elsa Bowman, 
who had recently come to spend the winter 
in Marion Taber's apartment at 264 Lexington 
Avenue. Elsa was looking well and hearty, 
can walk across the room, and is equipped 
so as to be able to go wherever she wishes. 
The guests were: Lydia Boring, Katherine 
Cook, Clarissa Smith Dey, Abba Dimon, 
Pauline Goldmark, May Jewett, Hilda Justice, 
Elisabeth Kirkbride, Emma Linburg Tobin, 
Ida Ogilvie, Carrie McCormick Slade, and 
Edith Wyatt. Edith was on her way home 
from a visit to Jamaica with her two sisters 
and told us of the beauty and romance of that 
island. 

Carrie Slade told us of Masa Dogura Uchida 
and her family. Since they had no children 
she and Baron Uchida adopted a daughter, a 
beautiful girl, of whom they were proud and 
fond. In order to carry on the Uchida name 
and title when she grew up, they looked for 
a suitable husband who must be the younger 
son of a family of equivalent rank who could 
be adopted into the Uchida family. The oldest 
son of titled family must carry on his own 
family name. Before such a husband was 
found for her, the daughter fell in love with 
a fine young man of lower rank, and with 
the agreement of Masa and Baron Uchida 
was married to him. They now have a child, 
but as the husband's rank is not correct Masa 
has found another young man of suitable rank 
and is now adopting him for the Uchida 
succession. All this has occupied Masa's atten' 
tion exclusively since the death of Baron 
Uchida. 

Lydia Boring, whose sister Alice is a pre 
fessor at Yenching University, talked most 
interestingly of conditions in China and told 
how members of the college were going forth 
into regions unoccupied by the Japanese to 
preserve their culture and freedom of thought. 

Elsa herself gave a graphic account of her 
experiences during the hurricane, of which 
the most startling was the sight of a clump of 



[23] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



trees uprooted in toto and hopping in stately 
formation down the hill, not stopping until 
they reached the bottom. 

Others gave accounts of their interests and 
activities and showed photographs of their 
families or homes. Letters and messages were 
read from many class members who could not 
come to the dinner, from which the Editor 
has gleaned the following news items. 

Clara Farr was absent because she was run' 
ning a bazaar in Philadelphia. She reported 
that they lost their garage and twenty or 
more fine trees when the hurricane struck 
New Hampshire. 

Anna Scattergood Hoag was spending the 
weekend in Baltimore, where Clarence was 
to preside at the annual Proportional Repre- 
sentation dinner. 

Mary Mendinhall Mullin wrote of the mar' 
riage of her son, James T. Mullin, on July 
30th to Margaret Wickersham, of Woodbury, 
New Jersey. James is practicing law in Wil- 
mington, Delaware, after having graduated 
from Haverford College in 1920 and taken 
graduate work at Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology and the Law School of the Umi' 
versity of Pennsylvania. He was admitted to 
the Delaware bar with the highest averages 
that have ever been given: 100% minus. 

Elizabeth Kirkbride read a letter from Ruth 
Furness Porter as follows: "James an d I have 
been with our friends, the Gordons, to the 
Southwest for the sort of flying trip that 
James likes best and which he packs with 
experiences and then returns rejoicing to his 
own fireside. Cliff dwellings and pueblos and 
petrified trees and painted desert were all only 
a preliminary to three exciting days at the 
Canyon. It was quite a feat for our old knees 
to ride down and up on mules over new trails 
built since we were there twenty-eight years 
ago. But it was so beautiful that we did not 
mind our aches. . . . Anne won the Midland 
Authors' Prize for her poems in Poetry last 
February. Fairfield had a realistic painting 
at the Art Institute of a storage warehouse 
in Evanston and has a most amusing letter 
from Mr. Davis, whose sign figures largely in 
the picture. He says it has caused much com' 
ment among warehousemen and they would 
like to reproduce the picture in their trade 
journal. . . . We are all excited over a recent 
visit of Eliot and Aline to New York when 
Aline got a picture into the Whitney Gallery 
show, a oncman show for next year some 
where else, and Eliot was asked to send an 
exhibit of his photographs to Steiglitz's gallery 
this winter and an article in the United States 
Camera Magazine soon. John and Eliot went 
to Bonaventure Island last summer and took 
bird pictures. John is showing his in Roose- 

E 



velt Hall and to the schools in his neighbor- 
hood. " 

1897 

Class Editor: Friedrika Heyl 

104 Lake Shore Drive, East 

Dunkirk, N. Y. 
Class Collector: Sue Avis Blake 

Cora Marsh, writing from her home, New 
London, says that she thinks that New London 
will emerge with some advantages that may 
compensate in part for the devastating loss 
suffered from the hurricane. Employment has 
been given to thousands, and the city may 
reclaim its waterfront, where parkways, munici' 
pal bathing beaches and parks will, they hope, 
replace the congested slum districts. 

The engagement was announced in the good 
old Boston fashion (Saturday Evening Tran- 
script) December 17th, of Mary Eliot Froth' 
ingham, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Channing 
Frothingham, of Boston, to Charles Jackson, 
Jr., elder son of Elizabeth Higginson Jackson 
and Charles Jackson. Molly Frothingham is 
Bryn Mawr, 1931. Charles Jackson, a gradu- 
ate of Harvard and of the Harvard Law 
School, is now with a law firm in Boston. 

Elizabeth Seymour Angel and her husband 
were in Florida during December occupying 
the bungalow of her sister, Clara St. John. 

We were proud to see in a recent issue of 
the New York Times, a very good picture of 
Marion Taber with a full column about her 
splendid pioneering work in furthering occu' 
pational therapy. Through her vision and 
faith and persistence while working as volun' 
teer and secretary in the New York State 
Charities, the early idea of giving the con' 
valescent "something to do" has developed 
during the last twenty-five years into a series 
of graded occupations based on scientific facts. 
Occupational therapy is now established in ten 
of the New York hospitals. Characteristically, 
Marion feels that they are only half way along 
in the work. Its progress is continually ham- 
pered by reduced budgets and lack of funds. 

Anne Lawther as usual is kept busy on the 
Iowa State Board of Education. There were 
numerous meetings during the summer because 
of new buildings going up with Federal aid 
on the campuses of five state educational in- 
stitutions. Last spring Anne took a holiday 
and drove to Mexico with two nephews. State 
duty prevents her from going to Australia to 
visit here two Odell nieces. The married niece 
expects to be there for three years. 

Emma Cadbury is back in Moorestown, New 
Jersey, at the home of her brother at 260 East 
Main Street. She arrived on December 16th 
after a stormy voyage, the misery of which, 



24] 






BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



she writes, made the crisp American air more 
intoxicating. After the busiest and most 
eventful of her fifteen years in Vienna, she is 
especially happy to be back again in her own 
land, in an "American-heated" house, basking 
in the brilliant winter sunshine. 

1898 

Class Editor: Edith Schoff Boericke 
(Mrs. John J. Boericke) 
333 Pembroke Road, Bala-Cynwyd, Pa. 

Class Collector: Elizabeth Nields Bancroft 
(Mrs. Wilfred Bancroft) 

The Philadelphia Inquirer on December 
31st carried a picture of Marion Park and 
congratulated her on her birthday. 

Martha Tracy also was featured in the 
Philadelphia papers because of the valiant 
work she has done in the field of preventive 
medicine at the Women's Medical College, 
which pioneered in courses in this subject, 
and her general discussion of the subject was 
carried. 

Blanche Harnish Stein's daughter, Caroline, 
was married on December 29th to Dr. James 
A. Gibson, Secretary to Mackenzie King, 
Prime Minister of Canada. They will live in 
Ottawa. Dr. Gibson is a former Rhodes 
Scholar, and Caroline has been an exchange 
teacher of English in London. 

1899 

Class Editor: May Schoneman Sax 
(Mrs. Percival Sax) 
6429 Drexel Road, Overbrook 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Class Collector: Mary F. Hoyt 

We send our deepest sympathies to Cora 
Hardy Jarrett, whose husband, Edwin S. Jar' 
rett, died on December 25, 1938. Mr. Jarrett 
was a well'known civil engineer and a Trustee 
of his alma mater, Rensselaer Polytechnic In' 
stitute, where he acted as Executive Vice-Presi' 
dent in the interim between President Ricketts' 
death and the installation of President 
Hotchkiss. 

1939 is here, and with it comes the realize 
tion that we have our Reunion to look for' 
ward to in June. 

Your President is already on the job. 

Your Reunion Chairman is vying with 
Grover Whalen in concocting propaganda to 
make Reunion, Bryn Mawr, June 1939, as 
attractive as World's Fair, New York, 1939. 

The first slogans that I have been let in on 
run as follows: "Reduced fare to the World's 
Fair should bring our fair to our affair," and 



"Your desire to view the World of the Future 
should be second only to your anxiety to 
hear reminiscences of the Past." 

Your Editor is hoping that the news she is 
unable to elicit from the pens of her class' 
mates will issue freely from their lips. Perhaps 
they are afflicted by the same inhibitions as 
Gertrude Ely, who writes as follows: "I real' 
ize you may have been hopefully expecting me 
to send you an account of my various activi- 
ties and I hope that my silence has not meant 
that you have been kept on tenterhooks, or 
that you have felt that I was not aware of 
the difficulties of collecting the material for 
the Bulletin. I seem to be swamped, as 
usual, and cannot imagine myself sitting down 
to dictate a story of my activities at this time. 
In fact I am talking about them so much these 
days before groups of insatiable women, that 
I have little time left. Just give me up and 
let me go!" We may be "insatiable women," 
too, in June. So we shall give her up and let 
her go — until then. 

Here is some news that Katherine Blackwell 
Middendorf says we should have heard long 
ago were it not for her old enemy — procras' 
tination: "Early in the summer I had a grand 
surprise — a visit of an hour from Bess Bissell. 
She and her sister Margery were on a long 
motor trip and stopped off at Yardley en route 
to Canada. She is the same old Bess, with 
her infectious laugh, and time has dealt very 
kindly with her. I am also somewhat late in 
announcing the arrival of my second grandson, 
Andrew Lewis Gaines, on August 1st, so now 
Pat and I have a grand total of five grand- 
children." 

May Lauts Sutliff is back in New York 
again for a few months, after having travelled 
abroad for a year and a half. We trust that, 
in June, she, too, will tell us more about her 
experiences. 

I had hoped to run an article this month 
with headlines something like this: "My Ex- 
periences in Rural England — The Differences 
Between Farming in the United States of 
America and Cultivating Ancestral Acres in 
Great Britain, by One Who Knows," but 
unfortunately Emma Guffey Miller had bron- 
chial pneumonia on her way back from Bill's 
wedding, and although now on the mend, even 
her willing pen is idle. 

1900 

Class Editor and Class Collector: 
Louise Congdon Francis 
(Mrs. Richard S. Francis) 
414 Old Lancaster Road, Haverford, Pa. 

Edna Fischel Gellhorn spent Christmas in 
New York with her four children, two daugh' 



[25] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



ters-in'law and three granddaughters. The 
youngest grandchild, Gay Gellhorn, is the 
daughter of Edna's second son, Walter, who 
is a member of the law faculty of Columbia. 
Gay was born after Edna arrived in New 
York. Between visits with her family Edna 
managed to get in almost daily speaking 
engagements for the League of Women 
Voters. After a flying trip to Bryn Mawr, 
Edna returned to Saint Louis on January 8th, 
owing to the sudden death of her mother. 
All members of the class will sympathize with 
her in her great sorrow. She had had nine 
weeks in New York and felt that it had been 
a great adventure. 

Cornelia Halsey Kellogg's son, Frederic B. 
Kellogg, was married December 17th to Miss 
Sarita Blagden, at Cold Spring Harbor, Long 
Island. Cornelia's daughter, Cornelia, who is 
a senior at Bryn Mawr, was one of the brides' 
maids. 

1901 

Class Editor and Class Collector: 
Beatrice MacGeorge 
Bettws'yCoed, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

1902 

Class Editor: Elizabeth Chandlee Form an 
(Mrs. Horace Baker Forman, Jr.) 
Haverford, Pa. 

Class Collector: Marion Haines Emlen 
(Mrs. Samuel Emlen) 

Bessie Graham is one of those who say they 
have no news! She writes from Philadelphia: 
"Fifteen years as Director of Temple Univer' 
sity School is the brightest spot in my past. 
Today [December 4th] we are enlarging the 
School to include public as well as school 
librarians and I am hoping we shall not be 
swamped. It requires eternal vigilance to keep 
up with the world of books, and constant 
learning to teach a subject that is forever new, 
so I have never left school. No education is 
ever finished in library work." 

The engagement is announced of young 
Marion Emlen, daughter of Marion Haines 
Emlen, and Mr. Charles Japy Hepburn, Jr., 
of Saint David's, Pennsylvania. Mr. Hepburn 
is a lawyer, descended from four generations 
of lawyers. The wedding is to take place the 
latter part of February. 

Elizabeth Bodine and Frances Seth have 
lately been visiting Marion H. Emlen at 
"Awbury," Germantown. Marion is just 
starting off on a West Indies cruise with her 
son, Sam, and Catharine Chapman, her eldest 
daughter. 

Jane Brown has visited the College several 
times of late. She thought the new Science 



Building wonderfully adapted to its needs, and 
wished she could take her chemistry courses 
with Dr. Kohler over again. 

Anne Rotan Howe, after a European trip, 
has settled down for the winter at River Oaks 
Gardens, Houston, Texas. Thorndike, Anne's 
eldest son, moved to Houston last April and 
set up for himself the J. D. Howe Con' 
struction Company. "His wife," says Anne, 
"triumphantly faced the climate in June and 
produced a female Howe — the first in four 
generations — October 2nd, named Olivia 
Anne. Young Edward Rotan's (my father's 
namesake) daughter was born in the same 
hospital nine hours earlier, and the two babies 
in bassinettes tied together furnished a momen' 
tary local sensation. 

"My youngest, Spencer Douglas, another 
engineer, after a year in Florida on a big mill 
there, is controlling floods in New Hampshire 
and relishing the skiing before the floods 
begin." 

Anne's permanent base is Gloucester, Mas' 
sachusetts. 

1903 

Class Editor: Mabel Harriet Norton 

540 W. California St., Pasadena, Calif. 

Class Collector: Caroline F. Wagner 

1904 

Class Editor: Emma O. Thompson 

320 South 42nd St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Class Collector: Isabel M. Peters 

Dr. Alice Boring sends word from Yen' 
ching University, Peiping, China — "Yenching 
carries on." 

Dr. Mary James's address for this winter 
is 111 North Fortyninth Street, Philadelphia. 
She is a member of the staff of the Institute 
of the Pennsylvania Hospital. 

Anna Jonas Stose and her husband are set' 
tied happily in their new home in Virginia. 

Jane Allen Stevenson composed, and com' 
piled the words for, a Christmas cantata. The 
cantata was very successfully given this Christ' 
mas season at the Girls' High School in Phila' 
delphia, where, you recall, Jane is Head of 
the Department of English. 

Margaret Ullman writes that she has moved 
out of her house to a small apartment in 
Winnetka. Her present address is 1097 Mer' 
rill Street, Winnetka, Illinois. 

Eloise Tremain, Evelyn Patterson and Alice 
Schiedt Clark had luncheon together in 
November. 

Eloise Tremain is back at Ferry Hall after 
a sabbatical for part of last year in Florida. 

Evelyn Holiday's daughter Evie is very 
much interested in her literary work in New 



[26] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



York. She lives in Greenwich Village in a 
fascinating apartment. 

An interesting letter has been sent to us by 
Alice Schiedt Clark. Alice tells of the doings 
of her children, a delightful and active group 
of young people. Her husband is President 
of the American Society of American Bac 
teriologists. Of herself she says: "My work 
continues, always with more than can be done, 
but constantly absorbing and varied: teaching, 
administration, committees, papers, investiga' 
tion and the personal problems of students 
and staff fill up the weeks. I received another 
liberal grant from the National Infantile 
Paralysis Foundation to continue our studies, 
although we have not been able to make any 
real contribution to the problems in that field 
for several years." 

At the dedication of the new chapel of 
Union Christian College for Women, Tokyo, 
Michi Kawai addressed the students of the 
Girls' School in Tokyo. 

A letter from Esther Sinn Neuendorffer 
brings sad news concerning Jeannette Hemphill 
Bolte. Her husband, Charles Bolte, after a 
prolonged illness, died in August. The class 
wishes to express its sympathy to Jeannette. 

1905 

Class Editor: Eleanor Little Aldrich 
(Mrs. Talbot Aldrich) 
59 Mount Vernon St., Boston, Mass. 
Class Collector: 

Margaret Nichols Hardenbergh 
(Mrs. Clarence M. Hardenbergh) 

As the Bulletin went to press news came 
from her husband of the death of Elizabeth 
Goodrich Reckett on December 3rd. The 
Class will wish to send him their deep sym' 
pathy. 

Frances Hubbard Flaherty writes from 10 
Prospect Avenue, Montclair, New Jersey 
(L. C. Marburg): "Please tell everybody I 
am thrilled to be back home and in New 
England, and that to be sure I shall not be 
away so long again I have become for the 
first time a property owner and, best of all, a 
Vermonter. That I shall be at the farm next 
summer — Black Mountain Road, R. F. D. 
Brattleboro, Vermont — fixing it over with tern' 
porary headquarters in the chicken house, and 
that I wish to goodness everyone would drop 
in and tell us what to do and how to do it! 
Daughter Frances will be with me. No new 
film project in the immediate offing; family 
efforts turning to writing." 

Florance Waterbury's recent exhibition of 
her paintings at the Montross Galleries in New 
York was written up in the Herald'Tribune 
with compliments from the critic for her un' 



conventionality and use of colour. He con' 
eludes with this comment: "Miss Waterbury 
is quite unpredictable." 

Avis Putnam Dethier's daughter, Margot, is 
a freshman and a member of the College Choir 
and Glee Club. She is already doing solo work 
and sang charmingly at the Christmas Carol 
Service in Goodhart. It was strange and 
rather uncanny to a 1905'er to see this replica 
of her mother apparently wearing a decidedly 
brunette wig! 

The Class extends warm sympathy to Gladys 
King Johnston, whose mother died in early 
December. For some years the Johnstons had 
made their home with Mrs. King. 

1906 

Class Editor: Louise Cruice Sturdevant 
(Mrs. Edward W. Sturdevant) 
3006 P St., Washington, D. C. 

Class Collector: 

Elizabeth Harrington Brooks 
(Mrs. Arthur S. Brooks) 

Helen Brown Gibbons' 1 son, Lloyd, will be 
married on the 20th of January in Troy, New 
York, to Miss Elizabeth Roy. 

Nan Pratt slipped and fell in the Yale 
Library on November 28th and broke her hip. 
She is doing nicely but is in for a long con' 
valescence and would certainly appreciate let' 
ters from her classmates. 

Mary Richardson Walcott's children, Molly, 
Bob, and Maurice, came down to Washington 
for their cousin Eleanor's coming'out party 
and they had an informal party with the Class 
Editor. Arthur Brooks, Beth Harrington 
Brooks's son, came, too. They were all per' 
fectly delightful and 1906 could well be proud 
of them. 

A letter in the New York Herald-Tribune 
from Tehyi Hsieh, Head of the Chinese Serv 
ice Bureau in Boston, says of Anne McClana' 
han Grenfell: "China is much the poorer 
today by the death of so staunch and stalwart 
a sympathizer and champion. ... A self'ef' 
facing, tireless worker for the happiness of 
others, few have filled so much into so short 
a span of life as did Lady Grenfell. . . . Hers 
was a life of devotion to her husband, his 
work, friends and her family, which will 
always be an inspiration to those privileged 
to know her well. She indeed must have 
lived much who lived so much for others. . . . 
So great was the beauty and vitality of her 
spirit that she lives and will continue to live 
with us, a fine spiritual presence. To those 
who knew her and loved her best, to thou' 
sands who have never met her, though ac' 
quainted only through the work of the Gren' 
fell mission, she remains deathless, even as 



[27] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



thoughts and the far-reaching influence of her 
monumental share in Labrador Grenfell Mis' 
sion are deathless. . . . This is but a brief 
outline, falteringly offered, of such apprecia- 
tion of inner spirit of a great soul, that I 
would share with all those friends of Lady 
Anna Elisabeth McClanahan Grenfell. . . . 
Her passing leaves an immeasurably large void 
among those who worked with her, aside from 
the greatest personal grief to those more in' 
timate." 

1907 

Class Editor and Class Collector: 

Alice M. Hawkins 

Low Buildings, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Lelia Woodruff Stokes, with her husband 
and two youngest children — snatched from 
their studies — have just started out on a thrill' 
ing trip to Africa. They expect to work up 
from Capetown to Cairo by every sort of loco' 
motion, including aeroplanes. Every detail has 
been planned in advance, even to procuring 
a zebra carcass to attract lions so that they 
will prowl around the camp and enable the 
wily Stokes family to photograph them. Leaping 
native dancers are awaiting their arrival in 
the interior, and butterflies have heard of the 
net which forms part of the travel equipment. 
For the moment all other 1907 exploits seem 
dull in comparison, and we shall look forward 
eagerly to April when we shall hope to have 
some up-to-the-minute news of the African 
expedition. 

1908 

Class Editor: Mary Kinsley Best 
(Mrs. William Henry Best) 
1198 Bushwick Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Class Collector: Eleanor Rambo 
1909 

Class Editor: Anna Elizabeth Harlan 
3 57 Chestnut St., Coatesville, Pa. 

Class Collector: Evelyn Holt Lowry 
(Mrs. Holt Lowry) 

1910 

Class Editor: Izette Taber de Forest 
(Mrs. Alfred V. de Forest) 
88 Appleton St., Cambridge, Mass. 

Class Collector: Frances Hearne Brown 
(Mrs. Robert B. Brown) 

One of the great pleasures in being Class 
Editor is, I find, the chance to hear from old 
friends that one hasn't seen or heard of since 
college days. From across the continent comes 
a note from Peggy James Porter in San Fran' 
cisco: "It's grand to hear from you again 
out of the years and here is to our meeting. 



My news is very homespun. A trip to British 
Columbia last summer; work in the League 
of Women Voters for me as my central ac 
tivity; college for my son; business school for 
my daughter; and no plans ahead. I like to 
think of you in Cambridge, but am myself a 
devoted Californian. Perhaps you will come to 
our Fair." 

Dorothy Nearing Van Dyne, with Pat 
Murphy and Janet Howell Clark, represented 
1910 at the Alumnae Weekend in October. 
Dorothy writes that she found the meetings 
most interesting and was greatly pleased with 
the new buildings. She hardly recognized the 
old campus. Unfortunately she sends no news 
of her life at home, for we should enjoy 
hearing about it. 

Jane Smith sends the following news: "This 
is my fifth year in Washington, where I have 
lived through all the alphabetical changes of 
the relief administration, now the Works 
Progress Administration, and have seen our 
workers 1 education program with unemployed 
teachers develop fairly steadily to meet the 
needs of industrial and rural workers. I am 
travelling about half the time, to help super- 
visors and teachers, and to take part in various 
conferences. The most interesting trip I have 
had recently was one to England, where I 
attended meetings of the International Labor 
Organization as a member of the committee 
to discuss workers 1 holidays and vacations with 
pay. I visited Oxford and Birmingham, saw 
a few workers' schools, and met men and 
women from a number of nations, who were 
attending the governing body of the Interna- 
tional Labor Organization. Talking with them 
gave me some idea of national psychology 
during and after the war crisis. My last week 
was spent in Paris and at an international 
school at Pontigny." 

1911 

Class Editor: Elizabeth Taylor Russell 
(Mrs. John F. Russell, Jr.) 
1085 Park Ave., New York City 

Class Collector: Anna Stearns 

Mary Case Pevear spent the Christmas holi- 
days in Washington, D. C, with her daughters. 

Margery Hoffman Smith will be in New 
York for four months this winter, in con- 
nection with the World's Fair. 

Betty Taylor Russell's daughter, Janet, 1940, 
is head of Choir and of the Religious Com- 
mittee at Bryn Mawr this winter. 

Marion Scott Soames and her daughter 
Bunty have been in Warrenton, Virginia, with 
her mother since October. They expect to 
return to their new house in Gloucestershire 
early in January. 



[28] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Charlotte Claflin has a job as caseworker 
in Lackawanna, Pennsylvania. 

Amy Walker Field's oldest boy, Jim, after 
a year in England and France, is taking a 
Master's degree at Harvard. Her second boy, 
Walker, is a freshman there. 

Catherine Delano Grant's oldest son, Zee, 
is working for the Union Pacific Railroad, pro- 
moting Sun Valley, Idaho. Fred and John are 
at Harvard, a senior and sophomore respec- 
tively. Anne is a senior at Chatham Hall in 
Virginia. She was a guest at the White House 
during the holidays. Pat and Christopher, the 
two youngest Grants, are still at school in 
Dedham. 

Kate Chambers Seelye writes that her 
daughter, Mary Averett, a student at Ben- 
nington, is specializing in the drama. She 
will spend the winter holiday "on the road" 
in a play written by the students. Her son, 
Talcott, is at Deerfield Academy. He is on 
the school paper and soccer team. Dorothea, 
Kate's oldest daughter, is in Washington study- 
ing for her M.A. at the American University. 
Kate herself has been Acting Dean of Women 
at Saint Lawrence for a few months during 
the illness of the regular Dean. All the Seelyes 
are spending Christmas in Washington, D. C. 

1912 

Class Editor: Margaret Thackray Weems 
(Mrs. Philip Weems) 
9 Southgate Ave., Annapolis, Md. 

Class Collector: Mary Peirce 



1913 

Class Editor: Lucile Shadburn Yow 
(Mrs. Jones Yow) 
385 Lancaster Ave., Haverford, Pa. 

Class Collector: Helen Evans Lewis 
(Mrs. Robert M. Lewis) 



1914 

Class Editor: Evelyn Shaw MgCutcheon 
(Mrs. John T. McCutcheon) 
2450 Lakeview Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Class Collector: Mary Christine Smith 

Dorothy Weston visited New York in De- 
cember, ostensibly for a Public Health meeting 
and to select a vocationalist (or whatever you 
call someone who practices vocational ther- 
apy), but she took in considerable social activ- 
ity while visiting Isabel Benedict. Dorothy's 
knowledge of the Bohemians with whom she 
worked some years ago at the Ian Huss House 

C 



in New York, made her comments on the 
Czecho-Slovakian affair enormously interesting. 
Bennie is still guiding the destinies of the 
many little stenogs which her personnel work 
puts under her, at the Bell Telephone Com- 
pany. 

Mary Smith and Dorothy Skerrett were also 
in New York for a few days after a ten days' 
fall motor trip to Williamsburg. Mary is very 
keen about the small orchestra she plays 
with — in fact, was so earnest in her practicing 
of the Beethoven First Symphony (piano part) 
that she broke five fingernails in the process! 
Dorothy seems still able to sell stocks and 
bonds when nobody else can sell anything. 

Lillien Cox Harman's daughter Adele is at 
Bennington College along with nieces of both 
Mary Smith and Elizabeth Baldwin Stimson. 
All three girls came out in the Thanksgiving 
holidays — Lill's daughter at a reception in 
Short Hills, where Elizabeth Fritz Colt Shattuck 
helped receive. Fritz is the discriminating 
member of the Board of the New York Union 
Settlement who selected Abe Lincoln of Illinois 
as its very successful winter benefit. 

Two members of 1914 — Elizabeth Baldwin 
Stimson and Marjorie Southard Charlock — 
attended the recent opening of the new Bryn 
Mawr Club quarters in New York in a small 
but pretty penthouse at the Barclay. 

1915 

Class Editor: Margaret L. Free Stone 

(Mrs. James Austin Stone) 

3049 44th St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 
Class Collector: Mildred Jacobs Coward 

(Mrs. Jacobs Coward) 



1916 

Class Editor: Catherine S. Godley 
2873 Observatory Ave., Hyde Park 
Cincinnati, Ohio 

Class Collector: Helen Robertson 

Frances Bradley Chickering and her family 
are again living in Washington, D. C, much 
to their delight. This was their fourth 
Christmas in a different place as they jumped 
from Manila to Kansas to Georgia to Wash- 
ington in best Army fashion. They expect to 
be stationed in Washington for some time and 
will be satisfied to limit their travelling to 
trips to the Jersey coast. Their address is 323 5 
38th Street, N. W., which is next door to 
Elizabeth Tinker Vandegrift. They have a 
hole cut through the hedge to facilitate com- 
munication and are finding life very pleasant. 
The twins are juniors in high school and John 
a sophomore. Mildred McCay Jordan stayed 
29] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



overnight with Frances in the fall when she 
went East to enter her older son in school in 
Pomfret, Connecticut. On that occasion their 
mothers' conversational abilities moved to awe 
the young in the Chickering and Vandegrift 
households. 

1917 

Class Editor: Bertha C. Greenough 

203 Blackstone Blvd., Providence, R. I. 

Class Collector: Dorothy Shipley White 
(Mrs. Thomas Raeburn White) 

Con Hall Proctor is now on her own farm, 
"Deerfield," Darlington, Maryland. She says 
that it is just a "regular farm with cattle — 
crops and hard work and lots of fun." She 
runs the farm and her husband commutes to 
Baltimore each day. "I hope lots of 1917 
will stop in to see us. We are near the Cone 
wingo Dam." 

It was very nice to see a Christmas card 
from Ryu Sato Oyaizu. We were only sorry 
that she sent us no news of herself. 

Use Knauth Dunbar responded promptly to 
a plea from your Editor for news, and the 
response was received with gratitude and a 
great deal of interest. Her oldest son, Jim, is 
studying 'cello and other music in the Longy 
School of Music, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 
Edward, her second son, is a freshman at 
Bucknell. Viola is finishing high school next 
spring, Alice is one year behind. Eva is fin' 
ishing grade school and Susanne is in the first 
grade. "Horses are all the girls ever think of 
and their only joy is riding and caring for the 
ones they have. I do 'sculp.' I had two 
pieces in a show in Woodstock, New York, 
last summer and a few times in the Junior 
League shows. I am also still singing." 

Marian Tuttle McElroy has a daughter, born 
October 20, 1938. She is Sue Prudence, 
named for her two grandmothers. Marian 
was married in the summer of 1934 to a 
doctor with a general practice, which keeps 
him very busy. They live in Rockaway, New 
Jersey, where they have a garden, and a dog, 
as well as a daughter. 

The New York Herald'Trihune of Decern' 
ber 27th carried in its front page a picture of 
Dr. Katharine Blodgett at work in the Gen' 
eral Electric laboratories with the captions, 
"Formula for Invisible Glass Is Found by 
Woman Scientist" and "Dr. Katharine 
Blodgett, Associate of Langmuir, Is Discoverer 
of Coating Four'Millionths of Inch Thick 
Which Will Pass 99% of Light." The purest 
glass only transmits about 92% of light. 
However little or however much we under' 
stand of what she has accomplished, we all 
offer her our heartiest congratulations. 



1918 

Class Editor: 

Mary-Safford Mumford Hoogewerff 

(Mrs. Hiester Hoogewerff) 

179 Duke of Gloucester St. 

Annapolis, Md. 
Class Collector: Harriett Hobbs Haines 

(Mrs. W. Howard Haines) 

1919 

Class Editor: Frances Clarke Darling 
(Mrs. H. Maurice Darling) 
12 Lee Place, Bronxville, N. Y. 

Class Collector: 

Mary Thurman Martin, pro tern. 
(Mrs. Millard W. Martin) 

1920 

Class Editor: Teresa James Morris 
(Mrs. Edward K. Morris) 
4950 Hillbrook Lane, Washington, D. C. 

Class Collector: Josepliine Herrick 

Helen Humphrey Jackson is now an enthusi' 
astic Californian, living in La Jolla, and spend' 
ing the summers at Lake Arrowhead, which 
is wonderful for her three children, aged fif' 
teen, twelve and eight. She and her husband 
had a trip to England and France recently, 
and were met in New York by Billy, fifteen, 
who had flown across the country. A very 
travel'minded "busy housewife" (as Helen 
calls herself)! 

Katharine Roberts Prew has sent me her 
school paper, The Jungle, very well edited by 
her pupils. A grade seven child writes in it: 
"I like going to the Prew School because we 
all enjoy our studies so much that we do not 
seem to be working at all." In my day, school 
was never like that! 

"Kewpie" (Hilda) Ferris has recovered 
from the serious operation she had last July, 
and sends her picture as a Christmas card, 
to prove that she is "hale and hearty again." 

"Ginger" (Virginia) Park Shook is proud 
to report that she now has two boys in high 
school. 

Begin packing immediately so that you can 
come to our nineteenth Reunion, and get first' 
hand information about your classmates and 
their children. 

1921 

Class Editor: Elizabeth Cecil Scott 
(Mrs. Frederick R. Scott) 
1823 Park Avenue, Richmond, Virginia 

Class Collector: 

Katharine Walker Bradford 
(Mrs. Lindsay Bradford) 



[30] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



1922 

Class Editor: Katherine Peek 

Rosemont College, Rosemont, Pa. 

Class Collector: 

Katherine Stiles Harrington 
(Mrs. Carroll Harrington) 

1923 

Class Editor: Isabelle Beaudrias Murray 

(Mrs. William D. Murray) 

284 N. Broadway, Yonkers, N. Y. 
Class Collector: Frances Matteson Rath bun 

(Mrs. Lawrance Rathbun) 
1924 
Class Editor: Mary Emily Rodney Brinser 

(Mrs. Donald C. Brinser) 

85 Washington St., East Orange, N. J. 
Class Collector: Molly Angell McAlpin 

(Mrs. William R. McAlpin) 
For our Class Notes this month turn to 
pages 15 and 16 of the Bulletin. There's 
glory for you! 

1925 

Class Editor: Elizabeth Mallet Conger 
(Mrs. Frederic Conger) 
Dongan Hills, Staten Island, N. Y. 

Class Collector: Allegra Woodworth 

1926 

Class Editor: Janet C. Preston 
Kenwood, Catonsville, Md. 

Class Collector: Mary Tatnall Colby 
(Mrs. I. Gordon Colby) 

What would we do for our winter's news 
If Jane Lee didn't take a cruise? 

But fortunately she hasn't failed us yet. She 
and her husband are going to Panama this 
time, for the month of January, and we're 
counting on them to fill the next issue with 
exotic stories. The last time they went on a 
cruise they met somebody who sold them an 
island, so perhaps this time when they get 
back they will find they have bought Brooklyn 
Bridge. 

Going south in mid-winter always seems to 
us the last word in sophistication, so it is nice 
to find we have a few members who achieve 
it. Miggy Arnold is one of them. She's going 
to Mexico in February with the Appalachian 
Mountain Club, to climb Popocatepetl. 

Happy Hopkinson is in this country for a 
visit, on leave from Geneva and the League 
of Nations, but that's all we know about her. 
We heard that from Molly Parker Milmine, 
who "just missed her by a cold." 

Janet Wiles Boyd has a third son, who is 
now nearly a year old. (The foreign bureau 



doesn't report very often. We can't help it.) 
Janet was last seen in Paris, with curls on the 
top of her head. 

Pussy Leewits Iselin has curls on the top 
of her head, too. She also has a country 
house, in conjunction with Sue and a cousin 
and their respective husbands. It is at Thiver- 
vale, which is not so far from Paris (unless 
you try to go there) and is called Le Cousi' 
nage. It's a fascinating place with a beautiful 
garden, and has no room for the respective 
children. It sounds like the ideal vacation 
spot — every family should have one. 

Tommy Tompkins Villard is moving from 
her apartment to the one next door. It's all 
beautifully simple. They've cut a hole in the 
wall between, and are just pushing things 
through the hole. We know nobody will be' 
lieve that, but we have it on good authority. 
The same authority hopes they won't all turn 
into White Queens when they get through to 
the other side. 

1927 

Class Editor: Ruth Rickaby Darmstadt 
(Mrs. Louis J. Darmstadt) 
179 East 79th St., New York City 

Class Collector: Dorothy Irwin Headly 
(Mrs. John F. Headly) 

Soon after the last installment of this saga 
was sent to the Alumnae Office, I received a 
note from Sally Peet Lewis telling of the 
arrival of her daughter, Meta Brevoort Lewis, 
in November. 

Dot Irwin Headly ends a recent letter with 
"Am taking drawing as a hobby, dietetics as 
a vocation and housework as a pastime!" 

Mary Robinson Cameron, in filling out the 
questionnaire, writes that she has no news 
"except that being a minister's wife in Scot' 
land is a full'time unpaid job just as in the 
United States of America" and that she wishes 
any Bryn Mawr, Class 1927 or otherwise, 
would look them up when or near Glasgow. 
Mary has two sons, one six and a half, and 
the other slightly over two. She is very inter' 
ested in peace work, is a local Women's For' 
eign Mission Convenor and active in the 
Young Women's Christian Association. In 
July they went to France and most summers 
they take trips to various places in England. 
Mary says she has an increasing touch of 
Scotch accent and a deep admiration for so 
many traits of British character along with a 
wish to transplant the best elements in Ameri' 
can life in Scotland. 

Alberta Sanson Adams and her husband 
and two sons are now stationed at Fort Lin' 
coin, North Dakota. Alberta writes that Bis' 
marck is unexciting to a degree so the post 
crowd amuses itself. "We all try to keep 



[31] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



awfully busy so we can forget where we are." 
Alberta does a little social service work with 
the Sioux Indians, especially the children, and 
is taking courses in Spanish and modern 
fashions and her hobbies include stamp col' 
lecting, photography and rifle, pistol and trap' 
shooting. She went to Philadelphia and Min' 
neapolis recently. 

Barbara Schieffelin Bosanquet lives in Sur' 
rey, England, and now has three little daugh' 
ters. The older children are six and four years 
old, respectively, and the baby is eight months 
old and named Barbara Clare. Barbara, 
senior, has many interests — she is a member 
of the Nursery School Committee Council, 
Secretary of the Standardization Committee of 
the I. F. E. O., takes a course in plant genetics 
at the Royal Horticultural Gardens, plays the 
harmonica and accordion, gardens and photo- 
graphs. This summer she took a trip to 
Sweden. Barbara writes that she sees Jane 
Hollister Wheelwright quite often. Jane's hus' 
band is completing his medical studies in 
London. The Wheelwrights have two chil- 
dren, a girl, six, and a boy, four. 

Gordon Schoff spent the summer in Italy, 
Greece and Germany travelling and painting. 
For three weeks, she and another girl went to 
an island in the Aegean Sea and stayed at the 
summer school of the Academy of Fine Arts 
of Athens. In December, Gordon exhibited 
the water colours she had done this summer. 
She also does oils. Gordon is a member of 
the Board of the Fellowship of the Pennsyl' 
vania Academy of Fine Arts. Her sports inter' 
est is golf. 

Dorothy Schurman McHugh writes: "I 
seem to have spent most of my time in China. 
(Peking 1927-1931; Shanghai 1932-1935.) 
My husband was ordered back in October, 
1937, but I stayed home and took an apart- 
ment in Washington.'" She spent last summer 
in Kingston, Rhode Island, and was planning 
to leave her two sons, aged eleven and ten, at 
boarding school near New York and sail for 
Hongkong this fall. 

Janet Seeky is an Associate Professor of 
Physical Education at William Smith College, 
Geneva, New York, and is Head Resident 
(Warden) of one of the dormitories. She 
writes children's books, draws and dances. Of 
the latter she says "but that is my job as well 
as my joy." For the last seven summers she 
has gone to Germany "to study dancing, ab- 
sorb the Bavarian unhurried life and drink 
beer." Jan gets four weeks' vacation at 
Christmas and for several years she has come 
for a week to Bryn Mawr with some of her 
pupils to dance with Miss Petts' pupils. They 
stay with Miss Petts, too, so Jan says it is 
quite a house party. Jan also finds time at 



William Smith to have a Dance Club and a 
Year Book "to play with." 

Gabrielle Sewall works for the State Relief 
Committee of Oregon. She lives in Portland. 
Last spring she came East and when she re- 
turned was a guest of honour at the Chamber 
of Commerce Forum luncheon. 

Lucy Shoe is Assistant Professor of Archae- 
ology and Greek at Mount Holyoke and when 
time permits she continues her private research 
on architectural mouldings. She says that fol- 
lowing art and archaeological events is her 
constant occupation, — "both my business and 
my pleasure." She draws a great deal but "it 
is restricted to my architectural mouldings, 
however." Her chief hobby is "being out- 
doors, — walking, climbing and living in the 
open, and the rougher and wilder the country, 
the better." Lucy says that after six years of 
running all over the Eastern Mediterranean 
and much of Europe, she is now settled in 
South Hadley. She occasionally goes to Bos- 
ton, New York, Philadelphia and Baltimore 
for meetings, museums and exhibitions and 
whenever she is in Philadelphia she tries to 
get over to Bryn Mawr to chat with Mildred 
Buchanan Bassett in the Alumnae Office and 
Mary Zelia Pease, who is giving Miss Swind- 
ler's courses this semester. 

1928 
Class Editor: Cornelia B. Rose, Jr. 

2333 South Nash Street, Arlington, Va. 
Class Collector: Mary Hopkinson Gibbon 

(Mrs. John H. Gibbon, Jr.) 

1929 

Class Editor: Juliet Garrett Munroe 

(Mrs. Henry Munroe) 

22 Willett St., Albany, N. Y. 
Class Collector: Nancy Woodward Budlong 

(Mrs. A. L. Budlong) 

1930 

Class Editor: Edith Grant Griffiths 
(Mrs. David Wood Griffiths) 
2010 Wolfe St., Little Rock, Arkansas 

Class Collector: Eleanor Smith Gaud 
(Mrs. Wm. Steen Gaud) 

1931 

Class Editor: Mary Oakford Slingluff 

(Mrs. Jesse Slingluff, Jr.) 

305 Northway, Guilford, Baltimore, Md. 
Class Collector: Lois Thurston 

Our biggest news item is that on December 
10th Molly Frothingham's engagement to 
Charles Jackson, Jr., of Boston, was an- 
nounced. He is a graduate of Harvard, Class 
of 1931, and of Harvard Law School, Class 



[32] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



of 193 5. He is also a brother of Betty Jackson, 
Bryn Mawr, 1933. Molly says that the wed' 
ding will probably be in June. She adds that 
the report of her studying at Radcliffe was 
erroneous and that, instead, she is teaching at 
the Shady Hill School in Cambridge. 

I ran into Julia Harris one day in Washing' 
ton a few weeks ago and was able to gain 
from her the following information: 

Celeste Page returned from Europe not long 
ago and during the last few months has been 
in Detroit, North Carolina, New York and 
Boston and has just left with her mother to 
spend Christmas in Montana. 

Mignon Sherley Acker came home from 
Kyoto quite a while ago. She and her hus' 
band and two children, a boy and a girl, are 
now living in Georgetown in what Julia says 
is a perfectly charming old house. 

Anne George Beverley has a son of whose 
age and name Julia was uncertain. 

Julia, herself, was looking very well and 
living with her mother in Washington at the 
Methodist Building. She is doing freelance 
advertising work and says that last summer 
when business was poor in Washington she 
took time off to be a volunteer worker in 
Senator George's campaign in Georgia. 

1932 

Class Editor: Margaret Woods Keith 

(Mrs. E. Gordon Keith) 

Box 208, Iowa City, Iowa 
Class Collector: Ellen Shaw Kesler 

(Mrs. Robert Wilson Kesler) 

1933 

Class Editor: Margaret Tyler Archer 
(Mrs. John S. B. Archer) 
St. Paul's School, Concord, N. H. 

Class Collector: Mabel Meehan Schlimme 
(Mrs. B. F. Schlimme, Jr.) 

Blessings on the several sources of my in' 
formation for this issue! 

First of all, there are two new arrivals to 
be announced: Jeanne Alice Jeffers, daughter 
of Ginny Balough Jeffers, born November 20, 
1938, and Eleanor Chalfant Thome's son 
Peter, born June 9, 1938, "just in time to 
prevent me from attending his daddy's gradu' 
ation from Cornell Medical College," writes 
Chalfant. 

A despairing wail from Kay Pier Farwell at 
Christmas time brings forth some information 
about her life, at any rate. Fred is a geolc 
gist with the American Smelting and Refining 
Company at their Santa Barbara Unit in the 
State of Chihuahua, Mexico. They have a 
daughter, born in El Paso last July 21st. 



And as for Ginny Balough Jeffers, she is 
hereby voted an cxtra'special halo for ferret- 
ing out such piles of news only a month after 
the baby's birth when her hands would be 
rather full with two children. 

Kathryn Lewis, ex- 193 3, was sent by Presi- 
dent Roosevelt to the Pan-American Confer- 
ence at Lima, Peru, as a member of the 
American Delegation. She has been her 
father's secretary, and "frankest counsellor," 
says Life, for the past three years. "She is 
labor's Jimmy Roosevelt," adds Life. It is a 
fine thing to have a national figure among 
the ranks of 1933. 

"Toody Hellmer, in addition to her regular 
job," continues Jinny, "teaches geology to a 
group of Chestnut Hill men. She says she has 
to study six nights a week to teach one; and 
then she can't answer all their questions. She 
also teaches ballroom dancing to beginners." 
Sounds like a very full life to us! 

Ginny also reports that Anne Channing 
Porter has two sons. Our baby record has 
now jumped to 15! When last heard of the 
Porters were in Chicago, but they may be back 
in New York by now. 

As far as we know, Ginny is the only one 
who graduated who has more than one child. 

Please, if your Editor sends you a postal 
for information, do write on it and return it, 
as there won't be any notes next month unless 
you do! 

1934 

Class Editor: Carmen Duany 

Hotel Ansonia, 74th and Broadway 
New York, N. Y. 

Class Collector: Katherine L. Fox 

Although the Bryn Mawr Club of New 
York invited over a thousand alumnae to the 
opening of its two new club rooms at the 
Barclay Hotel on December 8th, the Class of 
1934 managed to seise and occupy one half of 
one of these rooms for its exclusive use. There, 
presided over, entertained and refreshed by 
our own ambassador to the Bryn Mawr Club, 
Grace Meehan, some twelve New Yorkers 
gathered. Nancy Stevenson Langmuir, Honour 
Dickerman Brown, Betty Fain Baker and 
Bunny Marsh Luce seemed full of news but 
were most domestic and rushed back to their 
homes early, having failed to impart any. 
Bobby Smith and Christine Brown agreed that 
Bobby, who has now moved in to the East 
Eighties in Manhattan, is in the Claims De- 
partment of the Equitable Life Insurance 
Company. Elizabeth Hannan Hyman, for' 
merly at Radcliffe, now with the Council on 
Foreign Relations and in quest of good con' 
versation, invited everyone to phone her any 
day at the Council and accompany her to 



[33] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



lunch. Cornelia Hirons is at E. P. Dutton 
as Secretary to the Editorial Director and 
Promotion Manager. This summer she went 
Youth Hostel-ing through England with Cora 
Mclver. Cora is now back home in Wash' 
ington from England, Sweden and California. 
Sarah Miles Kindleberger and Louise Meneely 
Boehme offered no news but Maria Coxe, just 
back from a whirlwind trip to Jacksonville, 
Florida, New Orleans, etc., in connection with 
the Federal Theatre Project's production of 
one of her plays, burst in so breathless with 
description and excitement we shouted, "Stop, 
write it down!" and, believe it or not, she did 
and you may expect it in these notes next 
month. 

Last month's compilation missed at least one 
baby and one marriage in 1938. Margaret 
Dannenbaum Wolf's daughter, Ellen Rose, 
was born on August 10th. Mary Ruth Snyder, 
a graduate nurse, a registered nurse and a 
Master of Nursing with degree conferred by 
Yale, spent last winter in Bryn Mawr and did 
some private duty at the Bryn Mawr Hospital, 
where she saw Bryn Mawr from the other side 
of the tracks. She was married in April and 
has been living in Georgia with her soil-con- 
serving husband. She writes: "I have found 
out a lot about the South, and darned if they 
don't have peculiar ideas about the North — 
equal to mine about the South." She has had 
to learn to eat fat back, turnip greens and 
sweet potato pie and has had to enjoy fire 
crackers at Christmas. Get in touch with her: 
Mrs. F. Steele, 624 North Green Street, 
Gainesville, Georgia. 

Nancy Hart is back in Wisconsin on a 
statistical job which she loves and which takes 
her travelling, where winter is winter, around 
fourteen Southwestern counties. She feels 
Wisconsin is getting too conservative but 
Nancy is a Class Editor's joy so we won't 
say anything more. Margie Haskell spent her 
spare time and energy (she still seems to have 
plenty of both although she is endeavouring 
to pick up an M.A. in History at Radcliffe) 
this fall doing volunteer work for the Boston 
Republicans. Margie is a Class Editor's dream 
so we won't say any more. 

Many a teacher has been shifted around and 
has turned up where she wasn't. Emmaleine 
Snyder is teaching at the Hathaway Brown 
School in Cleveland and is delighted with 
her work. Jean Anderegg and Kay Boyd are 
both teaching in Baltimore this winter. Con' 
nie Coleman Courtney is teaching at Miss 
Fine's School in Princeton after this summer's 
"marvelous trip along the Maine Coast and 
through the whole Gaspe Peninsula." Terry 
Smith, Class Editor's right'hand man, is no 
longer at the Madeira School in Virginia. 



She has entered a new venture in the educa- 
tional field. She writes: "The Co-operative 
School for Student Teachers is the 'institu- 
tion'. It's an extremely interesting set-up in 
the experimental education field. We are 
farmed out, so to speak, to a co-operating 
school for practice for the first part of the 
week, and then we go to Bank Street for 
classes over the week-end. I am at Rosemary 
Junior School 'apprenticing'." Terry also 
went in for educating the young during the 
summer. She writes: "I returned to the scene 
of my childhood in the way of a camp in 
Northern Michigan, where I was the Direc- 
tor's Secretary and Sailing Councillor, a grand 
combination, especially if one is nutty on the 
sail-driven boats, as am I. I managed to cover 
my hands with good stout callouses and 
achieve the 'sailor's squint' from sailing the 
race course into the sun every day. Splendid 
fun." Mary Elisabeth Laudenberger Snively 
and Bob and the children at the Bement 
School built a dandy log cabin over week- 
ends this fall. They have competitors, how- 
ever, for Terry reports: "Bunny (Margaret 
Marsh Luce) and Hop have built a cabin up 
country to which they repair at the drop of 
a hat over week-ends. They built it them- 
selves, which is a feat in itself." 

Several people were expected back home in 
January, Polly Cooke Jones and her husband 
from Athens; Frances Jones from Turkey; 
Olivia Jarrett Fowler and her husband from 
Sweden, and Clara Frances Grant Ruestow 
and her two sons from Hawaii, to be sta- 
tioned at Mitchell's Field. 

And that is all the news there is unless you 
would like to hear a little gossip giving an 
intimate glimpse of your classmates' leisure 
hours or domestic life. Mary Carpenter Greve 
cooks very well but has been known to let a 
pot burn while absorbed in reading Black- 
stone's Commentaries. Anita Fouilhoux was 
seen at the Booth Theatre in New York en- 
joying Here Come the Clowns. Frannie Car- 
ter was seen at the Philadelphia Orchestra 
Concert in Washington. Marian Hope, who 
has been seen at the ice carnival at Madison 
Square Garden, spent a merry Christmas eve 
carolling around New York City (and under 
our window) with a gay German band. 
Esther Jane Parsons Dalglish and Garven 
decked a Christmas tree with candy canes 
and invited a generous portion of Bryn Mawr 
1932, 1933, 1934 and 1935 to come and eat 
and sing Christmas carols. Garven enter- 
tained the company by playing Gounod's Ave 
Maria on a saw. Maria Coxe invites her 
friends to delicious meals she cooks herself 
and makes them wash the dishes while she 
rests. Kitty Fox has been taking pictures and 



[34] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



developing them herself. And Sarah Miles 
Kindleberger has the distinction of having the 
only husband in the class who reads the Class 
Notes each month from beginning to end v . 

1935 

Class Editors: Elizabeth Colie 

377 Vose Ave., East Orange, N. J. 

and 
Elizabeth Kent Tarshis 
(Mrs. Lorie Tarshis) 
65 Langdon St., Cambridge, Mass. 

Class Collector: Joan Baker 

A recent sketch in the 7^eu> Tor\er on the 
subject of Alumnae Notes must have struck 
terror into the hearts of all Class Editors — but 
we have our duty as well as our pride. A 
few vital statistics first: 

Peggy Laird Anderson has a son, Christc 
pher Laird Anderson; Peggy Little Scott's son, 
Robert Thornton Scott, was born on Novem' 
ber 13th. Peggy Scott has moved to 1 
Primus Avenue, Boston. 

Nora Gladwin (Nora Macurdy) has an' 
hounced her engagement to Murray Fairbank, 
of Cold Spring Harbor, Long Island. 

Juliet Kibbey is working in Philadelphia as 
Secretary to L. S. Rockefeller, who is in 
the securities business. Her address is 134 
North Highland Avenue, Chestnut Hill. 

Gerry Rhoads is Managing Editor of a new 
digest magazine called The Woman. She is 
living at the Claremont Residence Club, 140 
Claremont Avenue, New York. 

A letter from Sarah Flanders says: "At 
present I am in the midst of my fourth year 
at Cornell Medical School, where I am divid' 
ing my time between Psychiatry and Pediatrics. 
Earlier in the fall I was on Surgery, where I 
learned to give anesthetics. This last Sunday 
brought me the news I have been waiting 
for — a twcyear interneship appointment at 
Bellevue Hospital. I am thrilled and looking 
forward to dashing about New York on an 
ambulance. I shall spend six months on the 
surgical service, six months on the pulmonary 
wards and one year on medicine. Last sum' 
mer I worked for two months at the Mary 
Imogene Bassett Hospital in Cooperstown as 
a clinical clerk, where I worked so hard I 
almost forgot what a bed felt like, but it was 
fun." 

Nancy Lane is back in Seattle and has been 
very busy with a recent benefit production of 
the Junior League Follies. She plans to come 
East in the spring. 

Maynie Riggs, who was with the Bryn 
Mawr Archaeological Expedition at Tarsus 
last spring, has been working in the children's 



book department at Dutton's during the 
Christmas season. 

Among our representatives in publishing 
houses are Betty Morrow at Bobbs'Merrill, 
Gerta Franchot Kennedy at Houghton'Mimin 
and Diana Tate'Smith at Harper's. Authors, 
take notice. Gerta has moved to 5 Everett 
Street, Cambridge. 

Diana Morgan Jackson is doing some inter' 
esting social work in connection with a magis' 
trate's court in New York. 

Vung'Yuin Ting Chang writes from Ann 
Arbor of her plans to return to China after 
she graduates, but says she still hopes to make 
a short visit to her friends in the East and 
see them again. She took her husband to visit 
Bryn Mawr last summer. 

1936 

Class Editor: Barbara L. Cary 
Merion Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Assistant Editor: Elizabeth M. Bates 
9 Fernwood Road, Summit, N. J. 

Class Collector: Ellen Scattergood Zook 
(Mrs. W. H. Dunwoody Zook) 

1937 

Class Editor: Alice G. King 

61 East 86th St., New York City 

Class Collector: Sarah Ann Fultz 

After an absence of seven months 1937 has 
officially pulled itself together and is bursting 
into print. Belated news of last spring and 
summer will be covered first and we hope that 
the up'tO'date activities will not have to be 
relegated to the next issue. 

Penny Hunter (Mrs. Roger C. Whitman) 
had a son, Grenville Bridgham Whitman, born 
on March 28th. Penny, after a winter of 
secretarial work at the Chapin School, has 
now gone across the street to the Brearley. 

Bobbie Duncan was married to Albert T. 
Johnson on June 16th. Mary Peters was 
among the bridesmaids. They had a brief wed' 
ding trip to Canada supplemented by one to 
South America in September. They are now 
living in Cleveland where Bobbie is becoming 
very domestic, but most of their time seems to 
be spent on the road between Cleveland and 
Columbus. 

Nora Bullitt has announced her engagement 
to Eugene W. Leake, Jr. 

Among those who are teaching is Ween 
Colbron at the Chapin School, where she 
seems to be covering quite a large variety of 
subjects. Lu Ritter has swelled the ranks of 
Bryn Mawrtyrs at the Brearley, where she is 
a student teacher in Latin. Lu spent part of 
last summer visiting Jo Ham (Mrs. Henry 
Franklin Irwin, Jr.) and travelling through 



[35] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Baltimore, Williamsburg, and points south. 
Dot Wilder is back at the Buckley. She spent 
a very pleasant summer in England, Scotland, 
and France and returned in time to extend her 
vacation by having appendicitis, which she 
says was lots of fun. Marian Gamble is teach- 
ing Latin, French, and English at the Peck 
School in Morristown, New Jersey. Spinny 
Vall-Spinosa is living in Low Buildings and 
is again teaching History at Shipley. She 
spent ten interesting weeks travelling in Eu- 
rope last summer. Mary Lou Eddy is teaching 
a variety of subjects to a variety of ages at 
the Brown School in Schenectady. She spent 
the early part of last summer driving out West 
and visiting Betty Webster in Illinois. Alice 
Martin is teaching Mathematics at the Shippen 
School in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. 

Several of our class are still studying along 
one line or another. Hoat Wright is at the 
Smith School for Social Work and at the 
moment is off on a field trip. Betty Holz- 
worth is doing graduate work at Yale. Ruth 
Levi is at Columbia studying for her M.A. in 
Psychology. Katharine Kniskern is after her 
Ph.D. at Johns Hopkins. Jean Lamson is 
studying sculpture at the Chicago Art Mu' 
seum. Betty Bingay has been at the Art Stu- 
dents' League in New York for the last few 
months. And there are rumors of quite a few 
people taking secretarial courses. We all come 
to it in time, it seems. Among the potential 
doctors are Ren Ferrer and Nini Wyckoff, in 
their second year at Physicians and Surgeons 
and New York University Medical School re 
spectively. 

Our travellers include Louise Dickey, who 
motored through Italy last summer. Lucy 
Kimberly was in England and we are told that 
she is now teaching in Baltimore. Is that 
right, Lucy? Dora Cole was in Canada last 
summer. Anne Kremer was in the thick of 
things in France and England during the re- 
cent crisis. Helen Fisher returned from Paris 
in November. She managed to be on the 
scene of every European excitement in the 
last few months, and her friends are wonder- 
ing whether' she was the cause or the effect. 
She went straight to Salt Lake City via New 
York, Boston, Syracuse, Cleveland, Chicago, 
Washington, and New York. 

Anne Marbury is still covering the States 
in rapid succession as press agent for the 
much-discussed Birth of a Baby. She was 
within telephoning distance of Memphis the 
other day (but don't think that's near, it goes 
under the heading of travelling expenses) and 
she talked to Kitty Maury. Kitty, it seems, 
is still coming out and is d<?but-ing again next 
season. But we thought as much, didn't we? 
Kathryn Jacoby spent part of last summer 



travelling with her family abroad. After a 
few weeks in Scandinavia she set off for Rus- 
sia by herself for a firsthand study of Com- 
munism. Get her to tell you about her adven- 
tures some time. 

Jean Cluett and Amelia Forbes spent part 
of the summer out West, and the temptation 
to quote from a recent letter of Cluett's is 
irresistible : 

"How to account for my summer? How, 
indeed! My dear, it is unaccountable. I went 
West in search of romance. Forbesie and I 
were chief-cook-and-bottle-washer (nominally 
at least) for two or three horse-herders in the 
mountains. 'Our Happy Home,' as we called 
it, was a. little tent pitched beside a gurgling 
spring, with woods on one side and a half 
mile of prairie between it and a ridge of 
rocky cliffs. Oh, the campfires! Oh, the 
moons! Oh, the howling coyotes! Oh, being 
overtaken by dark and having our men-folk 
search the mountains for us for three hours, 
only to find us at midnight sound asleep in a 
lonely cowherd's cabin! Let me tell you, the 
West is a place to be avoided unless your 
blood pressure is sub-normal, your auricular- 
ventricular valves well greased, and your sup- 
ply of adrenalin generously supplemented." 

Our secretaries, according to reports, are 
five in number. Ann Fultz; is working for Dr. 
Kraus at Bryn Mawr. Jane Fulton is a secre- 
tary in a life insurance company in Pittsburgh. 
Peggy Stark is at the Harcum School in Bryn 
Mawr. Betty Lloyd is a secretary in 
Philadelphia. Jehanne Burch is doing secre- 
tarial and personnel work for the Institute for 
the Crippled and Disabled in New York. 

The list of miscellaneous occupations is 
rightfully headed by the exciting news that 
Jill Stern is on the road with Shadow and 
Substance, playing the part she understudied 
all last winter. Dot Hood is a laboratory 
assistant to a doctor who is working on prolan 
at the University of Pennsylvania Medical 
School. She summered in Montreal. Gina 
Walker has a job at the Yale Library; Libby 
Washburn is back at the Brooklyn Museum, 
and Phyllis Dubsky is still standing the gaff 
at Macy's. 

Our married classmates are doing various 
and sundry things. Mary Flanders (Mrs. 
Oscar Edward Boline) is combining domes- 
ticity with lecturing to women's clubs on His- 
tory of Art. She is living in Kansas, where 
her husband ran for Democratic Representa- 
tive of the State Legislature in the recent elec- 
tion. Jo Ham Irwin is living in Princeton, 
where her husband is doing graduate work 
in English. Jo is working in the Treasure 
Room of the Princeton Library and tutoring 
in English. They spent part of last summer 



[36] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



at a camp for small boys in the Poconos. 
Madge Haas (Mrs. Christopher S. Donner) 
is living in Philadelphia and her husband is 
teaching at Chestnut Hill Academy. Anne 
Edwards (Mrs. Richard Inglis, Jr.) is in Cam' 
bridge doing social service work. Her hus- 
band is studying law. Judy Sigler (Mrs. E. 
Shaffer) is living in Lakewood this winter; 
and Barbara Sims (Mrs. William Bainbridge), 
much to our delight, has returned to New 
York. 

All applicants for the title of Class Baby 
please file claim immediately upon arrival. 

1938 

Class Editor: Alison Raymond 

114 E. 40th St., New York, N. Y. 

Class Collector pro tern: Mary Whalen Saul 
(Mrs. Robert Saul) 

The class wishes great happiness to Anne 
Reynolds and to Cocky Corson, who both 
announced their engagements on December 
28th. Anne is engaged to Lincoln Fra^ier. 
They are to be married in June and will live 
. in Marquette, Michigan, where Mr. Fraz,ier 
is the manager of a large chemical plant. 
Cocky's fiance is Burton Allan MacLean, a 
Yale Divinity student. His father is a minis- 



ter in Batavia. Whether Cocky is also going 
to be living in Batavia or not, we do not know. 

Tilly Tyler has embarked on a most inter- 
esting venture. She is trying to get the sum- 
mer theatres of the country to co-operate in 
having one common program, with single 
sheets inserted for their own particular pro- 
grams. In this way national advertising could 
be attained, and the program could be much 
like a trade journal. Tilly is working hard 
on this project, and it looks as though she 
would put it through. 

Gracie Fales wrote on a Christmas card: 
"My job is heavenly." Does anyone know 
what her job is? 

Alison Raymond is starting a business of 
her own in New York entitled "Proxy Par- 
ents. " It is keeping her extremely busy. De- 
tails can be found in "Vogue Covers the 
Town," the January 15th number of Vogue. 

Gertrude Leighton is commuting once a 
week to New York to take one or more writ- 
ing courses at Columbia, starting in February. 

Have just heard that Mary Walker has also 
announced her engagement this month to 
Charles Earl. All good wishes to her. 

The Alumnae Fund requests will have 
reached you all by this time. Let us help 
the Class Collector have a good record. 



T)eady for Delivery 



A series of twelve Staffordshire dinner plates by Wedgwood . 

Prim Jflator Pates 

Bryn Mawr Alumnae Association, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Please send me .sets of Bryn Mawr plates at $15 per set. 

Color choice [1 Blue ] Rose £] Green ] Mulberry 

Address _ „._ _ 



Ma\e checks payable and address all inquiries to Alumnae Association of Bryn Mawr College 

The Deanery, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 



[37] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 






IMECTOMY 






The Agnes Irwin School 

WYNNEWOOD, PENNA. 

Grades V to XII 

A College Preparatory 

School for Girls 

Kyneton School 

VILLA NOVA, PENNA. 

Pre-school and Grades I to IV 

BERTHA M. LAWS, A.B., Headmistress 



The Madeira School 

Greenway, Fairfax County, Virginia 
A resident and country day school 
for girls on the Potomac River 
near Washington, D. C. 
150 acres 10 fireproof buildings 

LUCY MADEIRA WING, Headmistress 



Wykeham Rise 

WASHINGTON, CONNECTICUT 
IN THE LITCHFIELD HILLS 

College Preparatory and General Courses 

Special Courses in Art and Music 

Riding, Basketball, and Outdoor Sports 

FANNY E. DAVIES, Headmistress 



BRYN MAWR COLLEGE INN 
TEA ROOM 

Luncheons 40c - 50c - 75c 
Dinners 85c - $1.25 

Meals a la carte and table d'hote 
Daily and Sunday 8:30 A.M. to 7:30 P.M. 

AFTERNOON TEAS 
THE PUBLIC IS INVITED 

MISS SARA DAVIS, Mgr. 
Tel: Bryn Mawr 386 



THE 
SHIPLEY SCHOOL 

BRYN MAWR, PENNSYLVANIA 

Preparatory to 

Bryn Mawr College 



ALICE G. HOWLAND 1 . . 

ELEANOR O. BROWNELL J Prmci P als 



The Ethel Walker School 

SIMSBURY, CONNECTICUT 

Head of School 

ETHEL WALKER SMITH, A.M. 

Bryn Mawr College 

Head Mistress 

CHARLOTTE WELLES SPEER, A.B. 
Vassar College 



Rosemary Hall 

Greenwich, Conn. 
COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

Constance Evers } 

Eugenia Baker Jessup, B.A. ; Headmistresses 

Bryn Mawr College ) 

Caroline Ruutz-Rees, Ph.D. 
Mary E. Lowndes, M.A., Litt.D. 



Advisers 



Approved Penna. Private Business School 

BUSINESS TRAINING 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
AND SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 
for young men and women. 

One, Two and Three Years 
Day and Evening Courses 
8 Weeks Summer Session 




Founded 1865 



PEIRCE SCHOOL 



Pine St. West of Broad 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



Kindly mention Bkyn Mawb Alumnae Bulletin 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 






IIECTOIY 



FERRY HALL 

Junior College: Two years of college work. 
Special courses in Music, Art and Dramatics. 

Preparatory Department: Prepares for 
colleges requiring entrance examinations, 
also, for certificating colleges and universities. 

General and Special Courses. 

Campus on Lake Front — Outdoor Sports — 
Indoor Swimming Pool — Riding 

For catalog address 

ELOISE R. TREMAIN 

LAKE FOREST ILLINOIS 



The Baldwin School 

BRYN MAWR, PENNSYLVANIA 

A Resident and Country Day School for Girls 

Ten Miles from Philadelphia 
Stone buildings, indoor swimming pool, sports. 
Thorough and modern preparation for all lead- 
ing colleges. Graduates now in over 40 colleges 
and vocational schools. 

ELIZABETH FORREST JOHNSON 
HEAD OF THE SCHOOL 



The Katharine Branson School 

ROSS, CALIFORNIA 
Across the Bay from San Francisco 

A Country School College Preparatory 

Head: 
Katharine Fleming Branson, A.B., Bryn Mawr 



A Book of 
Bryn Mawr Pictures 

32 Gravure Reproductions of Photographs by 

IDA W. PRITCHETT, 1914 

"The pictures are extraordinarily fresh and inter' 
esting, the text a golden mean between explanation 
and sentiment, and the form of the book is 
distinguished." President Park. 

Now on Sale at the Alumnae Office for $1.00 

(10 cents extra for postage) 



T0W-HEYW00n 

J / On theSound^AtShippan Point \j 

ESTABLISHED 186.1 

Preparatory to the Leading Colleges for Women. 

Also General Course. 

Art and Music. 

Separate Junior School. 

Outdoor Sports. 

One hour from New Yor\ 

Address 
MARY ROGERS ROPER, Headmistress 

Box Y, Stamford, Conn. 



MISS BEARD'S 
SCHOOL 

Excellent Preparation for the 
Leading Colleges for Women 

General Courses with 
Electives in Household Art*, 
Music, and Art 
Metropolitan opportunities in drama, 
art, and music. Country life and 
outdoor sports; hockey, basketball, 
lacrosse, tennis, archery, riding. 

Lucie C. Beard, Headmistress 
Box 84, Orange, New Jersey 




La Loma Feliz 

SANTA BARBARA, CALIFORNIA 

Residential School, Kindergarten through College 
Preparatory, for boys and girls who need especial 
attention or change of environment because of 
physical handicaps. No tuberculous or mentally 
retarded children can be received. 

INA M. RICHTER 

Medical Director and Head Mistress 

B.A. Bryn Mawr, M.D. Johns Hopkins 



ABBOT ACADEMY 

ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 
Over a century of achievement as its heritage. 
Rich traditions combined with modern methods. 
Thorough college preparatory course; also gen- 
eral course with emphasis on the fine arts. 
Excellent equipment. Beautiful country campus 
twenty-three miles from Boston. Ali sports. 
MARGUERITE M. HEARSEY, Principal 



THE MARY <♦ WHEELER 
SCHOOL 

Excellent college preparatory record. General course, 
choice of subjects. Class Music, Dancing, Dramatics, 
Art for all. Hobbies. Daily sports on 170 acre Farm. 
Riding, Hunting. Separate residence for younger girls. 
Mary Helena Dey, M. A., Principal, Providence, R. I. 



Kindly mention Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



College Publications — 



Colleges and schools are exacting in the accuracy 
and quality of their printing — and rightly so! The 
printer serving this field must measure up to an 
exceptionally high standard. The John C. Winston 
Company for more than thirty years has served 
the colleges and schools in this section of the 
country so well that many of the first accounts are 
still prominent in the rapidly increasing list. 

This same accuracy and quality extends to the 
printing of catalogs, booklets, folders, private 
editions, etc., handled through the Commercial 
Printing Department. Then, too, the versatility of 
our equipment many times offers a surprising price 
advantage. 

The John C. Winston Co. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



jform of pequesit for Cnbotoment 



I give and bequeath to The Trustees of Bryn Mawr 
College, a corporation established by law in the State of 

Pennsylvania, the sum of 

to be invested and preserved inviolably for the endowment of 
Bryn Mawr College, located at Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. 



Date 




*• *%?K*' 




\ z >y°\^ 




Chesterfields give me 
more pleasure than any 
cigarette I ever smoked 



A HAPPY COMBINATION OF THE WORLDS BEST TOBACCOS 



Copyright 1939, Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 






BRYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 
BULLETIN 




**«^w*i*S*® v ' 



THE HEALTH DEPARTMENT IN RELATION TO 
THE INCREASED NUMBER OF STUDENTS 

ALUMNAE COUNCIL PROGRAM 



March, 1939 



Vol. XIX 



No. 



Entered as second-class matter, January 15, 1921, at the Post Office-, Phila., Pa., under Act of March j. 1870 

COPYRIGHT, 1939 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



OFFICERS OF THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President Ida Lauer Darrow, 1921 

Vice-President Yvonne Stoddard Hayes, 1913 

Secretary Dorothea Chambers Blaisdell, 1919 

Treasurer Margaret E. Brtjsstar, 1903 

Chairman of the Finance Committee Edith Harris W>ist, 1926 

Directors at T artre I Gertrude Hearne Myers, 1919 

Directors at Large 1 Ellenor Morris, 1927 

ALUMNAE SECRETARY, Mildred Buchanan Bassett, 1924 

EDITOR AND BUSINESS MANAGER OF THE BULLETIN 

Marjorie L. Thompson, 1912 

DISTRICT COUNCILLORS 

District I Elizabeth Lawrence Mendell, 1925 

District II Ruth Cheney Streeter, 1918 

District III Mildred Kimball Ruddock, 1936 

District IV Ruth Biddle Penfield, 1929 

District V Eloise G. ReQua, 1924 

District VI Delia Smith Mares, 1926 

District VII Katharine Collins Hayes, 1929 

ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 
Eleanor Little Aldrich, 1905 Adelaide W. Neall, 1906 

Mary Alden Morgan Lee, 1912 Ethel C. Dunham, 1914 

Eleanor Marquand Forsyth, 1919 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ALUMNAE FUND 
Edith Harris West, 1926 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 
Louise B. Dillingham, 1916 

CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUND COMMITTEE 
Caroline Lynch Byers, 1920 

CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
Dr. M. Elizabeth Howe, 1924 

CHAIRMAN OF THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE 
Serena Hand Savage, 1922 



TABLE OF CONTENTS: 



Editorial page 1 

The Health Department, by Helen Taft Manning, 1915 page 2 

Need for the Expansion of Athletic Facilities, 

by Josephine Petts page 3 

An Experimental Theatre for Puppets, 

by Ruth Vic\ery Holmes, 1911 page 5 

From Bryn Mawr to Hudson Shore, by Jean Carter page 8 

Alumnae Council Program page 10 

The Alumnae Fund page 11 

News From the Branches page 12 

Of Interest to Alumnae page 1 3 

College Calendar page 14 

Programs of Musical Events page 1 5 

Undergraduate Notes, by Mary R. Meig.s, 1939 page 16 

The Alumnae Bookshelf page 1 7 

Short Plays for Small Pf.oplk 
By Ruth Vic\ery Holmes, 19] I 

Class Notes page 18 

Camp Directory Inside Back Cover 



Bryn Mawr Alumnae 

Bulletin 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 
THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

Marjorie L. Thompson, '12, Editor and Business Manager 
Mildred Buchanan Bassett, '24, Managing Editor for March issue 

EDITORIAL BOARD 
Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, '05 Denise Gallaudet Francis, '32 

Emily Kimbrough Wrench, '21 Louise Congdon Francis, '00 

Pamela Burr, '28 Barbara L. Cary, '36 

Ida Lauer Darrow, '21, ex'officio 

Subscription Price, $1.50 a Tear Single Copies, 25 Cents 

Checks should be drawn to the order of Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 

Published monthly, except August, September and October, at 1006 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

All material should be sent to the Alumnae Office the first of each month. 

Vol. XIX MARCH, 1939 No. 3 

The problem of fitting people for effective living in a democracy is one that has 
been discussed in these pages from various points of view. The question is in the 
air, and the deep concern with it shows our plight. In every paper and magazine 
some aspect of it is presented, with solutions suggested either in terms of living or in 
terms of education. When it is suggested quite seriously, as was done in one case, 
that 'tolerance 1 be included in the curriculum and be taught twice a week, one turns 
from theory to look for practice. 

Here at Bryn Mawr, before our very eyes, we have the democratic process work- 
ing admirably, each group consulting and working with every other group — adminis- 
tration, faculty, students, alumnae. The College Council is an instance which comes 
immediately to mind. Last June, at the luncheon for the alumnae, President Park 
announced that she was asking the President of the Alumnae Association, or her 
representative, to meet with the College Council. Those of us who have had the 
privilege of attending these meetings marvel at the seriousness with which the under- 
graduate representatives discuss the college problems. That does not mean that the 
discussion around President Park's long mahogany table is not lively and informal; 
it is amazingly so. There sit representatives from every college group: the President, 
the Dean, the faculty, the directors, the alumnae, the students, with the students 
in preponderance as they should be. The undergraduate representatives who come to 
the Alumnae Council marvel no less at our deep interest in the College and our sense 
of responsibility toward it. 

Here in the Bulletin the College puts before the alumnae the things about the 
College that interest or concern them, directly or indirectly. When we meet at the 
Alumnae Council, as we shall in the middle of March, we know that there, we, as 
alumnae, will discuss perfectly freely all of the things that concern us as an organiza- 
tion, and again, to consult with, we shall have representatives from each of the college 
groups. Here is the sound democratic method. 

The Alumnae Council carries the method to its logical conclusion, in that it is 
a deliberative body which refers its recommendations back to the alumnae as a whole 
for action. Certainly similar groups to these in the colleges of the country cannot be 
without their significance. 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



THE HEALTH DEPARTMENT IN RELATION TO THE 
INCREASED NUMBER OF STUDENTS 

By DEAN HELEN TAFT MANNING, 1915 



WHEN the plan for increasing the 
undergraduate body by one hun- 
dred students was presented by 
the joint committee of alumnae and direc- 
tors, President Park and I realised at 
once that there would be certain definite 
increases needed in the college plant be- 
yond the building of the new dormitory. 
The first and most urgent need which 
suggested itself to us was the increase in 
the number of beds in the Infirmary. The 
1905 Infirmary seemed magnificently ade- 
quate in its accommodations when it was 
first built, compared to the makeshift cot- 
tage behind Merion which served the 
College as an infirmary when I was an 
undergraduate; but we have been aware 
for a number of years now that the ac- 
commodations were barely adequate dur- 
ing the winter for the cases of grippe 
and miscellaneous ailments which are in- 
evitable, and that during an epidemic, 
even of a mild character, the situation on 
the campus becomes really very difficult. 
Several times we have had to clear the 
wing of Denbigh, either as a convalescent 
ward or as a ward for suspects, and it has 
become very clear in the last two years 
with the increase of students that the 
Infirmary can no longer take care ade- 
quately even of the routine illnesses of the 
winter. Plans are already being made for 
the increase in the number of rooms by 
extending the second floor of the Infir- 
mary over the lower wing of the first floor. 
The other point at which the expansion 
of the college facilities in order to take 



care of the additional students is needed 
is in the gymnasium accommodations. 
This need is, of course, less urgent than 
the need for a larger infirmary, but it is a 
need which would be much felt in the 
long run, even if the student body had 
remained the same size. Our present gym- 
nasium has really only one room which 
can be used for classes or games, and the 
problem of scheduling the varied activi- 
ties, which everyone agrees offer the best 
incentive to exercise and relaxation in 
the midst of a busy life, has become so 
difficult that dancing classes are now be- 
ing held in odd places around the campus 
where the space is quite inadequate, and 
the number of students who can actually 
participate in indoor games is consider- 
ably cut down. For a good many years 
we have realized that we need some kind 
of annex for the gymnasium, and the 
Athletic Association has recently been 
working on plans for one which will give 
facilities for new kinds of indoor exer- 
cise as well as more room for the old ones. 
In order to keep down the expense of the 
building, the best plan as proposed seems 
to be to locate it near the athletic fields, 
where the appearance will not attract 
much attention. Miss Petts in the follow- 
ing article has outlined the plans on which 
the Athletic Board has been recently 
working. It will be understood, of course, 
that these plans are subject to revision 
and improvement. We shall welcome sug- 
gestions and criticism from the alumnae, 
as well as encouragement and assistance. 



[2] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



NEED FOR THE EXPANSION OF 
COLLEGE ATHLETIC FACILITIES 



NOW that the undertakings, includ- 
ed in the 50th Anniversary Drive, 
are either well under way or ac- 
complished facts, the Department of 
Physical Education feels that it is time to 
start working again on its needs and to 
see what can be done about them. We 
must face the facts that now in 1939, we 
have less time in our schedule for ath- 
letics, the same amount of space, more 
students and wider range of activities 
than when the gymnasium was built 
thirty years ago. 

In 1909, when our present gymnasium 
was built, there were four hundred and 
twelve students at Bryn Mawr; three 
hundred and thirty-two undergraduates, 
eighty graduates. Now there are five 
hundred and ninety-seven students, four 
hundred and fifty-three undergraduates 
and one hundred and forty-four graduate 
students. The work with the graduate 
students is an increasingly large part of 
our program. The average graduate stu- 
dent of today is young, not long out of 
college, enthusiastic about sports or in- 
telligent in the recognition of her need 
for exercise. Her schedule is heavy and 
almost impossible to fit in with the under- 
graduate athletic program. There is a 
whole new field of work that should be 
opened for the physical education of the 
graduate student at Bryn Mawr. In 1941 
there will be five hundred undergraduate 
students and at least one hundred and 
forty- four graduates; that is two hundred 
and thirty-two more students or over fifty 
percent more undergraduates, eighty per' 
cent more graduates than when the pres- 
ent gymnasium was built. 

It is true that in those days some sort 
of exercise was required of the students 
through all four years of college; at pres- 



ent exercise is required by the Physical 
Education Department for only two 
years. It is also true, however, that a 
committee of undergraduates, headed by 
the President of the Athletic Association 
was, I think, somewhat surprised, 
although it was not news to us, to find 
upon investigation last year that every 
senior in College had taken, at least some 
time during the year, some form of exer- 
cise that came under the jurisdiction of 
the Department of Physical Education. 

It is also true that in 1909 the forms 
of exercise offered in the winter months 
at the College were: basketball, gymnas- 
tics, folk dancing, swimming, and fenc- 
ing. We now offer: basketball, theory 
and practice of good movement (required 
of all freshmen), folk dancing, modern 
dancing, Duncan dancing, social dancing, 
swimming, fencing and badminton. Tum- 
bling has been a popular class which has 
had to be dropped from the program for 
lack of space. 

In fact, the whole shift in the academic 
program means telescoping our schedule. 
For example, in 1909, as I understand it, 
the hours from four to six every after- 
noon were sacred to the name of sport. 
Now Wednesday afternoon from two to 
six is entirely given over to academic 
classes. Thursday afternoon is badly 
broken into, from our point of view, by 
Geology Laboratory which goes through 
to six; other laboratory periods are 
creeping up toward six, conferences, re- 
quired lectures (although, may I pause 
here to say that the Dean's office does its 
best to prevent these things from happen- 
ing), hall teas, professors 1 teas, follow 
each other in quick succession through the 
winter months between four and six. 
Then, of course, on Monday and Thurs- 



C3] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



day evenings there is choir practice in 
which a large and prospering (I am glad 
to say) group of students works hard for 
Christmas performances in the winter, 
harder for Glee Club performances in 
the spring, when there are fines imposed 
for non-attendance at rehearsals. Mon- 
day evenings come the Flexner lectures; 
lectures scattered through the evenings 
of the whole week, concerts and lectures 
of real importance that the students 
shouldn't miss — yet, in spite of the 
crowding, some valuable work is accom- 
plished. The students know this and are 
grateful, and they have again formed a 
working committee to help us with the 
problem of space. This committee has 
sent out letters to the fathers of the un- 
dergraduates asking for funds for squash 
courts and it has inspected buildings in 
the neighborhood that are more or less of 
the type it wants; and it is now engaged 
in forming alumnae committees to keep 
the alumnae informed of its activities. 

Our attempt in the exercise program 
is to keep enough variety without becom- 
ing elaborate, to give to each student the 
best possible instruction in an activity 
that really interests her, so that she shall 
have at her command not only while she 
is at College, but after College also, the 
technique of the sort of exercise she really 
likes so that her stamina can be main- 
tained to give the support to her intel- 



lectual life without which she cannot do 
her best work. Our policy, at present, 
is to give each student in College an idea 
of the fundamental principles of good 
movement and to teach her to apply these 
principles to her own life in such a way 
that she shall be able to move with dig- 
nity and self-possession. The exercise 
program during her college life is de- 
signed to be constructive as well as enjoy- 
able. Good instruction is given in the 
activity of her choice so that after a hard 
day's work in the classrooms and labora- 
tories the students may find themselves 
refreshed and enlivened, re-created for 
the tasks that lie ahead. To continue to 
develop and expand this program, as is 
obvious from the above, we need one 
thing and that is space. The plan we 
have worked out to meet these needs is 
"on the most economical lines which 
could possibly be devised": it calls for a 
large, inexpensive structure back of the 
varsity hockey field which would have 
space enough for one full-sised basketball 
playing floor, on which could also be 
marked out four badminton courts; there 
would be two squash courts, showers, 
lockers and possibly a space which per- 
haps could later be adapted that it might 
be used by the students for receiving their 
friends after games, or entertaining vis- 
iting teams. 

Josephine Petts, 
Director of Physical Education. 



ANNE MacCLANAHAN GRENFELL MEMORIAL 

A LETTER of appreciation for the note of sympathy sent by the Alumnae 
**■ Association has been received from Sir Wilfred Grenfell. Friends of Lady 
Grenfell and all those interested in the work among the inhabitants of Labrador will 
be interested to learn that the Grenfell Association is planning to erect a memorial 
building to her at Saint Anthony, where Harriot Houghteling Curtis, 1907, is now 
in charge. 



[4] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



AN EXPERIMENTAL THEATRE FOR PUPPETS 

AN ACCOUNT OF THE HOLMES THEATRE 
By RUTH VICKERY HOLMES, 1911 



THREE years ago I had the privilege 
of hearing a talk by Mrs. Mason 
Trowbridge, who for many years 
had been the doll designer for one of the 
largest doll manufacturers in our country. 
After her talk, she produced from her 
hand bag a few things she had picked up 
at Woolworth's — a bit of cotton, a piece 
of chamois for applying face powder, a 
needle and thread, a handkerchief, and a 
lipstick. With these she quickly and 
deftly made a really charming doll. And 
as she made it, I felt that the moment I 
got home, I, too, would make a similar 
charming doll. For in my inexperience, I 
thought the very simple materials were 
taking on form almost by themselves. Of 
course what was actually taking form was 
Mrs. Trowbridge's inspiration, and that 
came from her genius and the experience 
of years, which fact impressed me more 
and more as I struggled for months to 
make a doll in any way satisfactory. It 
was from that beginning, however, that 
eventually I succeeded in designing the 
new type of puppets that now serve as 
actors in my theatre. 

Following the talk by Mrs. Trowbridge, 
there was an earnest discussion on the 
theme: The Chief Factors of Fascination 
in Toys. At this point, will you consider 
and jot down your own answers to the 
following questions? Then you, too, will 
become earnest! 

1. When you were a child (roughly 
between six and twelve) with what 
did you most enjoy playing? 

2. Why did you enjoy it so much? 

3. From an adult viewpoint, when you 
have noticed children being particu- 
larly happy, with what have they 
been playing? 

4. Why were they being so happy? 



The answers to 1 and 3 will vary 
widely, but it is likely that the answers 
to questions 2 and 4 will be considerably 
alike. The success of a plaything prob- 
ably depends on its power to impart 
reality to whatever a child enjoys imagin- 
ing; on its power to call forth enough 
skill for the satisfaction of achievement 
without the risk of discouragement and 
frustration; and finally on its power to 
give scope for the contribution of origi- 
nal ideas. 

Here is one more question: 

5. What do you think would be the 
most fascinating possible plaything? 

My answer to questions 1 and 3 was, 
a toy theatre. My answer to question 5 
was a toy theatre such as had no existence 
so far as I \new. And at once I under- 
took designing the new theatre that the 
F. A. O. Schwars Company put on sale 
late in November, calling it the "Holmes 
Theatre." 

When the manager of F. A. O. 
Schwars suggested this name for my 
theatre, I agreed gladly, thinking that the 
suggestion was similar to being asked to 
do a signed article. But now, with more 
business experience, I feel sure that my 
name was chosen because of the trend of 
thought the sound of it calls forth. Thus : 
homes, simple, easy-to-do, no-professional- 
skill-required, and so on. You see, — an 
accident rather than an honour. 

Shall I list the objectives that I had in 
mind for the theatre I wanted to bring 
into existence? First of all, the theatre 
itself must be a real theatre in minia- 
ture — and a real theatre must have a cur- 
tain that operates reliably, lights to give 
it glamour, and the possibility for good 
scenic effects. Most important of all, it 



m 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



must have delightful actors, capable of 
being made to follow real stage directions 
(such as, Enter Left Second, Exit Right 
Third). It must afford, in short, a satis- 
factory means for producing plays, with- 
out requiring more than a child's own, 
unaided effort. Providing that the lines 
of the play are learned by heart, so that 
the process of play-giving does not have 
to be distributed into shares by a manipu- 
lator and a reader, I think that that ob- 
jective was reached, and that one child 
alone can manage my theatre adequately. 

The most difficult feature to design was 
a means of manipulation for the actors.. 
Hand puppets and marionettes, both per- 
fectly charming, usually require for their 
manipulation a human being apiece, with, 
usually, help available in the offing. Even 
the modified, one-string marionette that I 
contemplated seemed to me to ask too 
much of a very young play producer, 
who would have many characters to man- 
age at once. 

For a long time I experimented, and 
working models followed each other in 
long and expensive succession. An 
aluminum stage floor with electro-mag- 
netic control for the actors was one of 
the means I hoped might be satisfactory, 
but had to reject. At last, by making a 
slotted wooden stage floor, mounting the 
actors on small wooden blocks from which 
weighted handles projected downwards, a 
means of manipulation was provided. The 
actors could then be moved about with 
satisfactory precision from below the 
stage floor, without the means of their 
movements being perceptible to the audi- 
ence. But until last spring, when the 
management of the toy shop spurred me 
into special effort, only lateral motion was 
possible. Then I devised a special design 
for the slots that permits the actors to go 
forward and back, as well as from side 
to side. 



It was about that time, too, that the 
actors acquired more vitality. By being 
made on a foundation of pipe-cleaning 
wire, they took on a certain springy ani- 
mation, which warranted their being a 
feature of the theatre rather than merely 
an accessory. They became the Holmes 
Puppets. (Digression: One of the Ox- 
ford Dictionary's definitions for puppet 
is, "Person whose acts are controlled by 
another." That, I do hope, makes the 
use of the word puppet legitimate, and 
not too pretentious.) Together with the 
theatre, they were mentioned in Schwars's 
catalogue in a way that must have pleased 
them — in the toy world it is like receiv- 
ing favorable attention in Who's Who! 

The scenic effects are managed by hav- 
ing two sets of wings permanently in 
position on the stage floor, with change- 
able backdrops. My daughter Elisabeth 
designed the six backdrops that are now 
on sale with the theatre. She also de- 
signed the scenic properties — a cottage, a 
cabin, a merchant's booth, and so on — 
which are meant to be cut out, wedged 
into a stage floor slot, and to fill as many 
needs as possible. But there is no end to 
what children might contrive in addition 
for themselves. Interiors are effective 
with backdrops of plain fabrics and the 
use of actual doll house furniture. Or 
garden scenes can be done by using arti- 
ficial flowers and improvised trellises. 
And a palace scene of true splendor is 
easily made by getting brass teapot tiles, 
cardboard, and red velvet to combine 
themselves. Co-operative and kind as the 
management of F. A. O. Schwars have 
been, however, there were limits beyond 
which they would not go, and my palace 
scene has not been made available! Its 
making remains in the category of scope 
for a child's own efforts. 

In the course of the past three years, 
there have been both difficulties and de- 



[6] 






BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



lights. When first my theatre was conv 
pleted, and the book of plays to go with 
it wrapped and waiting for the express' 
man's call, a fire completely destroyed my 
house and everything in it but me, myself. 
Then this autumn, when I was hurrying 
to complete the last of the puppet cos- 
tumes, the hurricane blew an immense 
elm tree down upon my new roof, and 
the tidal wave came within three feet of 
sweeping 'through my workshop. This 
was disconcerting, but not a real set' 
back. Now I will stop this account of 
difficulties, and move on to the delights. 
There is, for instance, the proud title 
I bear. I am the Children's Theatre Con- 
sultant for F. A. O. Schwarz. It is a 
position with somewhat undefined duties, 
but one that has interesting possibilities. 
So far, in my new profession, I am afraid 
that I have been of use only twice. In 
December, when I was on the floor of 
the store on the corner of Fifth Avenue 
and Fifty-eighth Street, the very charm- 
ing wife of a well-known theatrical pro- 
ducer bought a theatre, and asked me if 
the cast of puppets for Snow White plus 
the cast for The Travelling Musicians 
would serve as a cast for Twelfth K[ight, 
to which I said "Yes. 11 Probably I said 
it with ecstasy, so happy did it make me 
to have her take my theatre with serious- 
ness and understanding. 



The other occasion that gave me a 
chance to be of use was solving a problem 
brought to me by a little girl, who asked 
me how to make "two men mermaids, a 
mother mermaid, a nurse mermaid, a 
mermaid aged eleven, and a mermaid 
aged ten. 11 All of these she needed very 
badly for a play she had written herself. 
I could not tell her instantly— concen- 
trated and long thought I needed first. 
But I did send off the completed cast in 
time to reach her by Christmas. 

It would have been much better, how- 
ever, if I could have done exactly as she 
wanted; instead of making them for her, 
if I could have given her help so that she 
could have made them herself. This 
brings me to the subject of my new hopes 
and present objectives. 

Besides longing to have children find 
delight in my theatre, I hope that it may 
be of use in progressive schools, and Sun- 
day schools. I hope, too, that it may be 
useful as a model stage for playwrights. 
To further its usefulness, I want to pre- 
pare a pamphlet with diagrams that will 
make the construction of my very simple 
type of puppet easy for anyone to man- 
age. I had thought that by this Christ- 
mas, my work would be completed. But 

. . . "Whom the gods love, find work 
that endeth not. 11 



JOSEPHINE GOLDMARK FELLOWSHIP 

TJ DITH BRAUN TREUER, the first recipient of the Josephine Goldmark Fellow- 
•* — ' ship (one of the three scholarships for German exiles, raised in the campaign this 
fall), has been given a fellowship by the Family Society of Philadelphia for a period 
of six months, as a result of work done with the Society since the beginning of her 
studies at Bryn Mawr in December. The fellowship enables her to continue her work 
at Bryn Mawr, and follow through with her present schedule in Education and 
Case Work. 

Berta Fischer has, therefore, been awarded the Josephine Goldmark Fellowship 
which Edith Braun Treuer is able to relinquish. Miss Fischer has to her credit nine 
semesters of study at Berlin University. She will specialise in Chemistry. 

C7] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 

FROM BRYN MAWR TO HUDSON SHORE 



THE Bryn Mawr Summer School for 
Women Workers in Industry, hav 
ing attained the age of eighteen, is 
setting up housekeeping in its own home 
where it will be known as the Hudson 
Shore Labor School. It is always difficult 
to break old and dear ties, and the pride 
and joy of the School in achieving a per- 
manent year-around home is generously 
mixed with sorrow that it will no longer 
be able to spend two months of each year 
on the Bryn Mawr campus. Two facts 
serve to soften the sorrow and increase 
the joy with which it accepts its new 
opportunity : it is leaving the campus with 
the parental blessing and good wishes of 
Bryn Mawr College; and in moving into 
the former home of Hilda W. Smith, it 
is having a share in the realization of her 
dream that this home should one day be- 
come a center for workers' education ac- 
tivities. That these activities should grow 
out of the Bryn Mawr Summer School is 
peculiarly fitting for it was Hilda Smith 
who gave substance to President Thomas' 
vision of a workers 1 school on the Bryn 
Mawr campus and it was her wise and 
far-seeing direction through the first four- 
teen years of its existence that gave to 
the School the stability that now makes 
it ready to take this next logical step in 
its development. 

It seems to both College and School 
that the age of independence has arrived 
and that there is danger of "arrested de- 
velopment' ' unless the School faces for- 
ward and courageously accepts its broader 
responsibilities. It does this, as we have 
said, with mixed emotions — a healthy 
fearfulness lest it be not yet sturdy 
enough, physically and spiritually, to meet 
the challenge of independent living; and 
a pleasurable excitement that it has an 
opportunity for greater service in the field 



in which it has pioneered and to which 
it is dedicated. 

That the Board of the Summer School 
was right in its feeling that there was a 
wider interest in and need for the services 
of the School than could be met on the 
campus of a woman's college available 
only in the summer months, is finding 
additional proof daily as requests come 
in for help in planning institutes and con- 
ferences for many groups. Already, be- 
fore there has been any publicity about 
the availability of the School to other 
groups, so many have requested its use 
for conferences that the place will be the 
scene of fairly continuous activity from 
the middle of May through September. 
There are also beginning to be murmurs 
about winter plans. Educational depart- 
ments of unions will carry responsibility 
for planning and financing these insti- 
tutes for their own members and the 
School will co-operate in planning the 
educational program. 

The focus of interest will, of course, 
continue to be the Summer School itself. 
A seven-week session will be held begin- 
ning June 17th for sixty students from 
the many industries employing women. 
These are no longer confined to such in- 
dustries as the needle trades, textiles, and 
shoes but have extended to mass produc- 
tion groups with which one ordinarily 
associates men workers — flat glass, alumi- 
num, rubber, automobiles. 

The national and international aspects 
of the school will be not only conserved 
but somewhat extended this year. Bring- 
ing workers together from many states 
and several foreign countries seems to the 
Board one of the unique and significant 
functions of the Bryn Mawr, and hence 
of the Hudson Shore, School. The British 
and Scandinavian committees have already 



£8] 






BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



selected their candidates. If applicants 
qualify, there will also be a worker from 
Mexico and two or three German refugee 
industrial workers in this year's student 
group. During the session the School will 
be visited by a delegation of seventeen 
French workers sent by their trade unions 
to visit American industries. 

In the midst of this first-hand contact 
with and discussion of the world situa- 
tion, there will go forward continuous 
exchange and analysis of experience 
among automobile workers from Kansas 
City or Detroit, rubber workers from 
Toronto and Akron, laundry or garment 
workers from Brooklyn, textile workers 
from New England and the South, skilled 
milliners and dressmakers from New 
York's exclusive ' 'uptown shops," alumi- 
num workers from Pittsburgh, and hosiery 
workers from New Jersey and Pennsyl- 
vania. Under the guidance of skilled 
teachers these workers will acquire back- 
ground for better understanding of their 
problems and be better equipped to carry 
the responsibility placed on every citizen 
in a democracy. In attempting to describe 
the unique opportunity offered by the 
Summer School one of last summer's stu- 
dents said, "It's the chance to discuss 
what has happened to us with teachers 
who can add it all together and make it 
mean something." 

This does not result in a narrow pro- 
gram, for "what has happened to us" 
covers the whole range of human experi- 
ence, and teachers of literature, science, 
history, and psychology play as impor- 
tant a part in "adding it up to make it 
mean something" as do teachers of eco- 
nomics. These women workers are not 
alone in their desire to find meanings for 



life in relation to their experience; they 
are, however, among the few to whom a 
school specially planned in terms of their 
needs offers this opportunity. Just this 
morning a letter has come to the Director 
from one of last summer's students saying 
"Bryn Mawr has impressed me with the 
seriousness of tasks to be done; yet I'm 
able to laugh a little more, to be less 
fearful, and take life with a firmer stride." 
The "broader vision of this world of 
ours" she acquired in the School came, 
she says, not only from her classes but 
also from "companionship with the girls 
and informal talks with the teachers." 

This type of education must be ex- 
tended if any order is to come out of the 
chaos of the world today. During its 
eighteen years of experimentation under 
excellent conditions and with wise edu- 
cational guidance on the Bryn Mawr 
campus the Summer School has acquired 
understanding and skill, that have won 
for it an enviable place in the adult edu- 
cation movement both at home and abroad. 

The change in location together with 
plans for an expanded program at this 
time is educationally a sound step but 
financially a courageous one. The School 
is able to take it because of its faith that 
workers' education is a powerful weapon 
with which to combat the forces threat- 
ening democracy in the world today; and 
because of its conviction that an increas- 
ing number of persons recognize the im- 
portance of extending such educational 
programs if democracy is to survive. This 
conviction will be put to the test during 
the next few months as we attempt to 
raise funds for scholarships for this sum- 
mer's school. 

Jean Carter, Director. 



[9] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 

PROGRAM FOR THE ALUMNAE COUNCIL 
TO BE HELD IN NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT 

March 9th, I Oth, I Ith, 1939 

THURSDAY, MARCH 9th 

12.45 P. M. Luncheon for members of the Council at the Faculty Club, 149 Elm Street, New Haven. 

2.00 P. M. Business Session at the Faculty Club. 

Discussion of Financial Affairs of Association. 

4.15 P.M. Tea for Council, parents of Bryn Mawr students and interested friends, at the home of 

Elizabeth Lawrence Mendell, 1925 (Mrs. Clarence W. Mendell), 80 High Street, 

New Haven. 
5.15 P.M. Scholarships Conference and Supper at the home of Helen Evans Lewis, 1913 

(Mrs. Robert M. Lewis), 52 Trumbull Street, New Haven. 

(Those members of the Council who are especially concerned with Scholarships 

will leave the Tea early to attend the meeting.) 

7.00 P. M. Dinners at homes of Alumnae. 

8.30 P. M. Informal Discussion Meeting at the home of Mrs. Mendell. 

FRIDAY, MARCH 10th 

10.00 A.M. Business Session at Westover School, Middlebury, Connecticut. 

Questions for Discussion led by the Chairmen of Committees. 

12.45 P.M. Luncheon at Westover School as guests of Louise B. Dillingham, 1916. 

2.00 P. M. Meeting of the Council at the home of Florence Martin Chase, 1923 

(Mrs. Rodney Chase), Starkweather House, Watertown, Connecticut. 
Phases of the College. 

The Undergraduate Point of View. 

Mary Whalen Saul, 1938. 

Ann C. Toll, 1939, President of the Senior Class. 
The Graduate School. 

Virginia L. Peterson, A.B. 1938, Mills College, California. 
The Faculty. 

Mary S. Gardiner, 1918, Associate Professor of Biology. 
The Board of Directors. 

Eleanor Little Aldrich, 1905, Senior Alumnae Director. 

4.30 P. M. Tea at Starkweather House. 

7.30 P. M. Dinner at the New Haven Lawn Club, 193 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, 
for members of the Council and all Alumnae of District I. 

Address by President Par\. 

SATURDAY, MARCH Nth 

10.00 A.M. Meeting of the Council at the home of Mrs. Mendell. 
Reports from the District Councillors. 

1.00 P.M. Luncheon at the home of Mrs. Mendell. 

2.30 P. M. Guides will be provided for any members of the Council who care to visit points of 
interest in Yale University. 

[10] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



..he Alumnae tund 



We've made splendid progress but there's 



STILL A HARD PULL AHEAD 




Are you sending fuel ? Or are you 
4, 

•J* 

\ ^ 



^LEGEND^ 

THE FREIGHT PULLED BY 

THE ALUfANAE ASSOCIATION*. 

E3 RHOADS SCHOLARSHIPS 50 

[LTD DEANERY / OOO 

SCIENCE BLUG FURNI5H- I OOO 

E3 f3.r\.C. for ACADEMIC NEEDS 4>O0O 

AND THE ENGINE MUST BE KEPT IN REPMR! 



CHEQUES r\U6T REACH THE ALUttNAE OFFICE &Y APRJLA^TH. 

SEND YOURS TODAY 



Cii] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



NEWS FROM THE BRANCHES 



NEW YORK 

HTHE Bryn Mawr Club of New York 
-*• will hold its annual dinner for Presi- 
dent Park at the Hotel Barclay on Thurs- 
day evening, March 23, at 7.30 p.m. Miss 
Park and Mrs. Rustin Mcintosh (Milli- 
cent Carey, 1920), Headmistress of the 
Brearley School, will speak. All alumnae 
are invited to attend. Reservations may 
be made by writing to the Bryn Mawr 
Club, Hotel Barclay, 111 East 48th 
Street, New York City. Price: $2.25 for 
members of the Bryn Mawr Club; $2.50 
for non-members. 

On the 6th of March the Club will 
have an illustrated lecture by Louise H. 
Wood (Bryn Mawr, 1919) on "Italy- 
Yesterday and Today." Buffet supper, 
preceding the lecture, will be at 6.30. 

This lecture will be the fourth of a 
series of fortnightly supper lectures 
started at the Club in January. The first, 
a discussion of the Lima Conference, 
given by Dr. Charles Fenwick of the De- 
partment of Politics, drew such a large 
audience that a special suite of rooms at 
the Barclay was used. 

During the D'Oyly Carte Company's 
run on Broadway, Mr. Ernest Willough- 
by of the Department of Music gave a 
delightful talk, "Reminiscences of Gilbert 
and Sullivan at Bryn Mawr" (with ap- 
propriate movies and music) . Following a 
buffet supper on February 24, Dr. Paul 
Weiss of the Department of Philosophy 
made "Jumbled Remarks on God, the 
State and Man." 

CHICAGO 

The Radcliffe and Bryn Mawr Clubs 
in Chicago held a joint luncheon the end 
of January for Dorothy Sands and Cor- 
nelia Otis Skinner. 



DURHAM 

ON April 1st, President Park will pre- 
side at the morning session of Duke 
University's Symposium on "Women and 
Contemporary Life," the last of the series 
planned for the Duke University Cen- 
tennial Celebration. 

Marcia Lee Anderson, 1936, President 
of the Durham Bryn Mawr Club, sends 
the following statement by Dr. Katharine 
Gilbert, Director of the Symposium : "The 
Symposium falls into three parts. On 
Friday afternoon, March 31st, the theme 
will be woman's relation to the present 
international situation and her vocation 
for peace. The second part will begin 
with the banquet Friday night and con- 
tinue through Saturday morning, the 
theme being 'Woman and Leadership: 
Qualifications and Hindrances. The third 
will cover Saturday afternoon and eve- 
ning and deal with woman's self-expres- 
sion through art. . . . 

"The Woman's Symposium promises to 
be not a single assembly but a congress 
of assemblies: a social organism embrac- 
ing many other organisms." Some co- 
operating groups are the State Associa- 
tion of University Women, the State 
Nurses Association, the Mount Holyoke, 
Bryn Mawr and Smith College alumnae 
and various local clubs. 

Since the Symposium has been sched- 
uled for the period of spring vacation, 
the dormitories on the Women's College 
campus are open to those who attend. 
The cost of the week-end, including 
meals, amounts to only $4.00. Reserva- 
tions should be made through Miss Eliza- 
beth Aldridge, Secretary of the Alumnae 
Association, Duke University, Durham, 
North Carolina. 



[12] 






BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



OF INTEREST TO ALUMNAE 



THE two tablets recently arrived 
from England have been placed in 
their appointed locations, making 
the number of such memorial tablets, 
given as a result of the Fiftieth Anniver- 
sary Drive, seven to date. 

Marjorie Jefferies Wagoner tablet 
is in the library of the Chemistry 
and Geology Building. 

Elisabeth H. Blauvelt and Mary 
D. Hopkins tablet is in the Physical 
Chemistry Laboratory in the Chem' 
istry and Geology Building. 

Dr. Alfred F. Hess tablet is in 
Dr. Crenshaw's laboratory in the 
Chemistry and Geology Building. 

Anne H. Strong tablet is in the 
Quantitative Analysis Laboratory in 
the Chemistry and Geology Building. 

Frances Bliss Tyson tablet is in a 
research room in the Chemistry and 
Geology Building. 

The Emmy Noether tablet is in a 
mathematics room in Dalton. 

The Class of 1905 tablet is in the 
Chemistry and Geology Building. 

In addition, the James E. Rhoads 
tablet is in the vestibule of Rhoads 
Hall, and the Alice Patterson 
Bensinger tablet is in the downstairs 
hallway of Dalton. 

The tablets were executed by George 
H. Hart and Sons of Campden, England. 
This firm has done other similar work for 
the College. 



Following almost immediately upon the 
editorial in the Alumnae Bulletin last 
month about the change in the form of 
bequest, came the announcement that a 
gift of $20,000 was left to Bryn Mawr 
College by Amalia F. Morse, of New 
York City. Mrs. Morse was the aunt of 
Dr. Linda Lange, 1903. 



Several departments have announced 
series of special lectures open to any in' 
terested persons. The Department of 
Classical Archaeology has already had 
Dr. Axel Boethius, noted Swedish archae' 
ologist, and Dr. Alan J. B. Wace, for 
many years Director of the British School 
of Classical Archaeology at Athens. The 
department is also included in the group 
sponsoring a Symposium on Art, planned 
this spring, which will be conducted 
jointly with the Departments of History 
of Art and Philosophy. Outside lecturers 
will be invited from time to time to par- 
ticipate in the lectures and discussions, 
which will be held on Monday and 
Wednesday afternoons in April. 



Miss Isabel Scribner Stearns, Ph.D. 
1938, Assistant Professor of Philosophy 
at Smith College, has been awarded the 
Margaret Snell Fellowship, offered by the 
American Association of University 
Women for 1939-1940, for philosophical 
study at the University of California. 
Miss Stearns graduated magna cum laude 
from Smith College in 1931 and subse- 
quently did graduate work at Radcliffe 
as well as at Bryn Mawr. She held the 
Mary Elisabeth Garrett European Fel- 
lowship in 19354936. 



Dr. Charles W. David, Professor of 
History, is away on a sabbatical leave 
during the second semester. He expectr 
to study and do research work in the 
library at Harvard University this spring, 
following a brief vacation trip. Dr. 
David hopes to complete a book which 
he has had in preparation for some time 
dealing with the twelfth century and the 
Crusades. Dr. Richard Saloman will lec- 
ture at Bryn Mawr this semester in Dr. 
David's place. 



cm 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 
COLLEGE CALENDAR 

Saturday, March 4th — 8 p.m., Goodhart Hall 

Square Dance for the benefit of the Bryn Mawr Camp. 
Tickets: $0.50 for dancers, $0.15 for spectators. 

Sunday, March 5th — 4.30 p.m., Deanery 

Recital by Dr. Fritz Kurzweil, distinguished pianist, formerly of Vienna. 

Sunday, March 5th — 7.30 p.m., Music Room, Goodhart Hall 

Service to be conducted by Dr. Hornell Hart, Professor of Sociology and Psychology at 
Duke University. 

Sunday, March 12th — 4.30 p.m., Common Room, Goodhart Hall 
Art Club Exhibition and Tea. 

Monday, March 13th — 8.30 p.m., Goodhart Hall 

Violin Recital by Marjorie Edwards. This is the fifth event of the College Entertainment 

Committee Series. 

Tickets: $2.00, $1.75 and $1.50. 

Tuesday, March 14th — 8.30 p.m., Gymnasium 

Spring Dance Recital by the students in the College classes. 

Wednesday, March 15th — 2 p.m., Deanery 

Annual Bridge Party for the benefit of the Eastern Pennsylvania Regional Scholarships. 
Tables $4.00: Tea and prize included. 

Saturday, March 18th — 8.30 p.m., Goodhart Hall 

Les Perles de la Couronne with Sacha Guitry, a movie presented by the French Club. 
Tickets on sale at door. 

Sunday, March 19th — 7.30 p.m., Music Room, Goodhart Hall 
Service of Music. 

Monday, March 20th — 8.20 p.m., Goodhart Hall 

Fifth of the series of lectures on the Historical Development of the Constitutional Powers 
by Judge Florence E. Allen of the United States Circuit Court of Appeals, under the 
Anna Howard Shaw Memorial Foundation. 

Tuesday, March 21st — 8.30 p.m., Goodhart Hall 

Recital by the Hampton Dance Group of the Hampton Institute, Hampton, Virginia. 
Tickets: $1.50, $1.00 and $0.50. 

Wednesday, March 22nd — 8.20 p.m., Goodhart Hall 

Sixth and final lecture of the series on the Historical Development of the Constitutional 
Powers by Judge Florence E. Allen. 

Friday, March 24th— 12.45 p.m. 
Beginning of Spring Vacation. 

[14] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 
MUSICAL EVENTS 

RECITAL BY DR. FRITZ KURZWEIL 

Presented by the Entertainment Committee of the Deanery 
Sunday, March 5, 1939, at four-thirty o'clock 

PROGRAMME 
Two organ choral preludes Bach (Buson 



(a) Nun komm der Heiden Heiland 

(b) Nun freut euch, lieben Christen 

Sonata, Op. 13 (Pathetique) Beethoven 

Intermezzo, E flat minor, Op. 45 Max Reger 

Intermezzo, E flat major, Op. 117, No. I Brahms 

Rhapsodie, E flat major, Op. 119 Brah 



ms 



Intermission 

Prelude, D flat major Chopin 

Nocturne, F sharp major Chopin 

Two Etudes, Op. 25, A flat major, C sharp minor Chopin 

Scherzo, B flat minor Chopin 

La Cathedrale engloutie Debussy 

Jeaux d'eaux Ravel 

Suggestions diabolique Prokofieff 

SERVICE OF MUSIC 
Sunday, March 19th, Music Room, Goodhart Hall 

The College Choir, under the direction of Mr. Ernest Willoughby, will give at 
this service a cappella music from the works of Palestrina, Vittoria, Byrd, Bach, and a 
varied program of music by Purcell, Mendelssohn, Elgar, etc. 

Helen Rice, 1923, Warden of Rhoads Hall, will play solos for violin, and with 
a group of players made up of students in the College, will assist in renderings of 
early instrumental music for strings. 

In addition, there will be organ solos of some of the Choral Preludes of Bach, 
played by Mr. Willoughby. 

an 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



UNDERGRADUATE NOTES 

By MARY R. MEIGS, 1939 



THE mid-year period is always the 
most surprising two weeks in the 
year; with the suspension of all 
ordinary extra-curricular activity, we are 
face to face for once with time which 
may be used for uninterrupted study. 
But we are so accustomed to working 
under pressure that unless we have exam- 
inations or quizes or papers, we are de- 
ceived by the long vista ahead of us, and 
waste it shamelessly. 

There are infinite ways of wasting time 
at Bryn Mawr, because to waste time, by 
definition, is to do anything that is extra 
extra-curricular, such as reading the news- 
paper. Ordinarily, we have just long 
enough to consume the headlines with our 
morning coffee, but during mid-years 
newspaper reading assumes enormous pro- 
portions, and may even include a trip to 
the magazine room to see whether the 
Tribune is as pessimistic as the Times. 
After this rite, someone is likely to ob- 
serve over milk- lunch that the hill behind 
Rhoads is in excellent condition. Fortu- 
nately, winter always chooses to come at 
the end of January, and this year was no 
exception. In spite of the fact that Rhoads 
is sprawled over the best part of our ski- 
ing hill, it has created a precipitous arti- 
ficial bank on its southwest side, so that 
we can almost achieve perpetual motion 
between the top of the bank and Miss 
Park's house. ' 

There are other time-wasters in the 
realm of sport. Basketball can hardly 
count because practicing went on regu- 
larly during mid-years, but we have 
drawn the obvious conclusion from the 
white feathers lying about on the gymna- 
sium floor that badminton is played. 

To judge from the popularity of the 
ping-pong table and the dart boards in 



Rhoads, there should be more space 
everywhere for informal game-playing. 
We doubt if ping-pong could be fitted 
into the other halls, but darts might liven 
up the show cases. The Pembroke show 
case has become almost livable since mag- 
azines were introduced into it, though it 
still looks gloomy beside any of the rooms 
in Rhoads. The Rhoadsites are full of 
enterprise and have covered the white 
walls of their game room with murals, 
which consist chiefly of inspired indi- 
vidual efforts. As a result, they are dis- 
tinguished by an attractive planlessness, 
and can easily be washed away for the 
next experimenters. 

The bicycle racks in the hall basements 
testify to our great utilitarian exercise. 
On the coldest days we prefer to walk, 
but before long we will be riding off for 
the joy of it, and barefacedly borrowing 
any bicycles that are conveniently un- 
locked. By spring the Saunders Youth 
Hostel barn will have thawed again, and 
will be a haven for whoever feels Rous- 
seaunian. Bryn Mawr's most consistent 
extra extra-curricular occupations, of 
which exercise is at least a preliminary, are 
going to the Friday afternoon concert, and 
having tea at the College Inn. Every week 
the amphitheatre at the Academy is full 
of familiar faces; every day from four to 
six-thirty the Inn hums and rattles. 
Going to the Inn is far more insidious 
than going to the concert, and like read- 
ing the newspaper, is most prevalent dur- 
ing the mid-year period. Now that classes 
have begun again, it is easy to predict a 
disheartening decrease in all these enter- 
taining occupations, and the substitution 
for them of the normal extra-curricular 
activity with a modicum of honest aca 
demic work to set it off. 



[16] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



THE ALUMNAE BOOKSHELF 



SHORT PLAYS FOR SMALL PEO- 
PLE. By Ruth Vic\ery Holmes. 
Samuel French, New York City. 

THIS is a delightful and practical 
book to put into the hands of a 
child who likes to do things for 
himself. It consists of six plays. Four of 
them are adapted from the Brothers 
Grimm, Hans Christian Anderson, Moth- 
er Goose, and the immortal Little Blac\ 
Sambo. Snow White and the Seven 
Dwarfs in a simplified version, and a kind 
of dramatized l\[ight Before Christmas 
are not quite as charming as the others, 
but all of them could be acted out in a 
lively fashion by children themselves, or 
adapted for use in a puppet theatre. 

The foreword to "the producers of 
these plays" is a model of its kind. Many 
a grown-up producer could take to heart 
Mrs. Holmes' admonition to the child: 
"When you present a play you are mak- 
ing a present of pleasure to your audi- 
ence. The present of pleasure must not 
turn out to be, even in the least, a trial of 
patience." And so she tells about re- 
hearsals and getting on and off the stage 
and lighting of a safe kind, "for a play 
producer is really under honour not to 
burn up the audience," and last, but cer- 
tainly not least, gives excellent sugges- 
tions for simple scenery and costumes, all 



within a child's scope. These last range 
from the melted butter and the tigers in 
"yellow canton flannel one-piece garments 
and tiger masks," in Little B\ac\ Sambo to 
the king in Snow White and the Seven 
Dwarfs, resplendent in his "green hunt- 
ing cap with a gold crown worn over it. 
(In real life royal personages do not wear 
their crowns while hunting, but in fairy 
tales they wear their crowns every mo- 
ment.)" In When Christmas Comes, the 
producer is told how to make an entirely 
satisfactory North Pole with a blue cur- 
tain and cotton sheets, and to omit 
Christmas greens if he wishes, because 
greens do not really have to be arranged 
until Christmas morning and the play 
takes place the night before. 

The acting directions for the most part 
urge the child to think himself into his 
role, but sometimes there is an admonition 
that one is sure is gladly taken to heart 
by the actor. "Suggestions for acting" for 
The Old Woman and Her Pig point out 
that "Great care must be taken by the 
little pig in regard to his final squealing. 
It must be loud, impassioned, and im- 
pressive." And so the final curtain falls, 
according to the last stage directions, on 
squealings that "convey defiance rather 
than acquiescence," just as they should 
for those who know their Mother Goose. 
Marjorie L. Thompson, 1912. 



' I 'HE College was shocked and grieved to learn, on February 1st, that Hilda 
■*■ Elizabeth Robins had died in her sleep. Mrs. Robins came to Bryn Mawr College 
in 1922 as Manager of Merion Hall. In 1925 she became College Stewardess and 
Manager of Yarrow East and West. In 1932 she was made Manager of Low Build- 
ings, which position, combined with that of College Stewardess, she held until the 
time of her death. 



[17] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



CLASS NOTES 

Letters sent to a Class Collector, care of the Alumnae Office, 
will be promptly forwarded. 



DOCTORS OF PHILOSOPHY 

MASTERS OF ART 

FORMER GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Editor: Vesta M. Sonne 
Radnor Hall, 
Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Class Collector for Doctors of Philosophy: 
Marion R. Stoll 

Class Collector for Masters of Art and 
Graduate Students: 
Helen Lowengrund Jacoby 
(Mrs. George Jacoby) 

1889 

Class Editor: Sophia Weygandt Harris 

(Mrs. John McA. Harris) 

105 W. Walnut Lane, Germantown, Pa. 
Class Collector: Martha G. Thomas 

1890 

No Editor Appointed 

Class Collector: Elizabeth Harris Keiser 
(Mrs. Edward H. Keiser) 

1891 

No Editor Appointed 

CJass Collector: Lilian Sampson Morgan 
(Mrs. T. H. Morgan) 

1892 
Class Editor and Class Collector: 

Edith Wetherill Ives (Mrs. F. M. Ives) 
28 East 70th Street, New York, N. Y. 

1893 
Class Editor: Susan Walker FitzGerald 
(Mrs. Richard Y. FitzGerald) 
7 Greenough Ave., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Class Collector:: Elizabeth Nichols Moores 
(Mrs. Charles W. Moores) 

1894 

Class Editor and Class Collector: 
Abby Brayton Durfee 
(Mrs. Randall N. Durfee) 
19 Highland Ave., Fall River, Mass. 

1895 
Class Editor: Susan Fowler 

420 W. 118th St., New York City 
Class Collector: Elizabeth Bent Clark 

(Mrs. Herbert Lincoln Clark) 



1896 

Class Editor: Abigail Camp Dimon 

1411 Genesee St., Utica, New York 

Class Collector: Ruth Furness Porter 
(Mrs. James F. Porter) 

1897 

Class Editor: Friedrika Heyl 

104 Lake Shore Drive, East, 
Dunkirk, N. Y. 

Class Collector: Sue Avis Blake 

It is a matter of deep regret that we did not 
know that Edith Edwards, whose death, on 
November 26th, was briefly recorded in the 
January Bulletin, had been very ill for more 
than a year. For the past two years she had 
made her home with her brother and sister' 
in'law, Mr. and Mrs. Ariel Ballou Edwards, 
236 Woodland Road, Woonsocket, R. I. Mr. 
Edwards has written that the last year was a 
great trial for Edith. Besides having a weak 
heart with serious complications, she was near' 
ly blind. She had two nurses to give her 
comfort. 

Edith Ballou Edwards was born in Boston, 
the daughter of Dr. Daniel Mann Edwards 
and Laura Ballou Edwards. She was prepared 
for college in private schools here and in Paris, 
and entered Bryn Mawr in February after a 
half year at the Baldwin School. Her course 
was interrupted, but she took her degree in 
1901. 

After graduation she was interested in wel' 
fare work, education, and particularly in patri' 
otic organizations, and worked on committees 
for over twentyfive years. Among the many 
organizations that had her special interest are 
the Daughters of the American Revolution 
(she was regent of the Woonsocket Chapter); 
the Rhode Island Society, U. S. Daughters of 
1812, which she organized; the Republican 
Club and the Castilian Club in Boston; the 
Woman's National Country Club in Washing' 
ton; the Forum Club in London. She travelled 
about extensively and enjoyed her numerous 
club contacts. 

Bryn Mawr alumnae friends in Boston recall 
her enthusiastic interest in the Bryn Mawr 
Club and her faithful support on all occasions 
during the years when she spent her winters 
in Boston. They recall also the gracious hos' 
pitality extended by her from her old home 
on Beacon Hill. 

The Class sends its deep sympathy to Mr. 
and Mrs. Edwards. 



[18] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



May Campbell has returned from the West 
and expects to be in her apartment, 204 
Church Street, Boonton, N. J., for the re 
mainder of the winter. She came from Chicago 
with a blizzard which, alas, prevented her from 
stopping over in Dunkirk. She reports the 
arrival of a great'nephew, Peter Gorham Pol' 
son, son of Mary Babson Poison. 

And Gertrude Frost Packer has a grandson, 
Harold Seager, born in October, son of Mary 
Packer Seager and Cedric Seager. 

Emma Cadbury has been visiting her pro' 
fessor brother in Cambridge and has been 
giving talks in Cambridge, at the Friends'' 
Meeting House; in Wellesley and in Connecti' 
cut. Elizabeth Jackson reports that Emma was 
a most interesting guest at her home in Boston 
on two happy occasions — at luncheon with 
Gertrude Packer and Ruth Porter, and again 
at a merry dinnerparty with Gertrude and her 
husband and the Seagers, as well as all of the 
Jacksons and Molly Frothingham. 

Indirectly we have heard that Mary Con- 
verse is in Florida. She is still wearing her 
cast, but expects to have it taken off when she 
returns the middle of February. 

Indirectly also we hear that Corinna Putnam 
Smith has gone to Egypt as usual. 

1898 

Class Editor: Edith Schoff Boericke 

(Mrs. John J. Boericke) 

333 Pembroke Road, Bala-Cynwyd, Pa. 
Class Collector: Elizabeth Nields Bancroft 

(Mrs. Wilfred Bancroft) 

Anna Dean Wilbur writes that she and 
Dr. Wilbur are settled at 826 Vanderbilt 
Place, San Diego, California, "on a hilltop 
overlooking the Bay and Point Loma." Their 
son, Bertrand, Jr., was married on November 
24th to Miss Virginia May Wyatt, of La Jolla, 
California. 

Edith Schoff Boericke has the sympathy of 
her Class in her sorrow at the death of her 
sister, Eunice Schoff Simons. 

E. N. B. 
1899 

Class Editor: May Schoneman Sax 
(Mrs. Percival Sax) 
6429 Drexel Road, Overbrook 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Class Collector: Mary F. Hoyt 

The Class extends its deep sympathy to 
Dorothy Sipe Bradley, whose husband, James 
C. Bradley, died in January after a long illness. 
Mr. Bradley was born and educated in Wash- 
ington, D. C. After studying law, he moved 
to Pittsburgh, where he was well known as an 
expert on patent law. 



In response to a request for news of her 
recent trip to Europe, Emma Guffey Miller 
writes : 

"I sailed on November 15th with Mrs. 
Reeve, Carroll's sister Ashley, for France. We 
spent ten days in Paris and thereabouts, and 
then went to England. 

"It was great fun revisiting old haunts af- 
ter so many years, as well as noting changes. 
Paris, of course, still remains much the same 
as it was, except I do not like the electric 
signs which they have apparently adopted from 
us. Some streets and boulevards at night were 
too reminiscent of Times Square and Broad- 
way. However, Napoleon's tomb was just as 
impressive as ever, and I thought of that won- 
derful history course of the Napoleonic era we 
had under our beloved Doctor Andrews. It 
was startling to go into the cathedrals and 
churches and find the preparations being made 
to remove the old glass in case of war. You 
will remember that Saint Chapelle has a chapel 
underneath the famous one, and I was so 
startled to see the lower chapel half filled with 
wooden cases. All of them carefully labelled. 
When we asked what this meant, we were 
told that every window had been carefully 
prepared to be packed quickly in case of air 
raids. The same was true of the Cathedral at 
Chartres, Notre Dame, and every other place 
where there was rare and beautiful glass. This 
alone, it seems to me, is enough to make every- 
one denounce Hitler and Mussolini. 

"In London most of the parks presented a 
very torn-up appearance. They are still dig- 
ging trenches to shelter people from air raids. 
It gave one a curious feeling to see this work 
being done in Hyde Park and other familiar 
spots. 

"I forgot about strikes and wars when we 
went down to Sussex to attend Bill's wedding 
to Molly Hornsby in St. Margaret's Church, 
Ifield, Crawley, Sussex. The church was built 
in the Twelfth Century and most of it has 
been changed little since that date. The mar- 
riage ceremony of the Church of England re- 
sembles our own Episcopal ceremony, but is 
much longer. It is a combination of marriage 
and regular church service, very impressive, 
and took a full half hour. Then the bride and 
groom came down from the Chancel to an 
alcove at one side of the church, where the 
Vicar, Sir Bertram, Lady Hornsby and I all 
signed various papers which, of course, are to 
be filed away so that a thousand years from 
now it can be proven that Bill and Molly were 
duly wed. 

"I think at times we all imagine ourselves in 
unusual or odd situations, but never in my 
wildest dreams did I ever think that I would 
be standing beside the tomb of a first crusader 



[19] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



in an English parish church writing my name 
down as a witness to my son's wedding. 

"After this little formality was over, the 
bride and groom walked down the aisle to the 
accompaniment of the wedding march, with a 
dear little niece of the bride holding up her 
long train and veil. As they reached the end 
of the aisle, the bells in the old Norman Tower 
began to peal joyously. As we came out of the 
church and walked through the old church' 
yard on the usual red velvet carpet, which 
made a pathway between the old tombstones 
on either side, all the villagers, from babies in 
arms to toothless old dames, were there waving 
good luck to "Miss Molly." Then we went 
back to The Old Rectory, the Hornsby home, 
for the reception, where there were the cus' 
tomary toasts, punctuated by the usual English 
"Hear, hear" . . . 

"Bill expects his work in France to be 
finished in March, then they will come to 
New York to live. I told John before I sailed 
I did not want him to pull anything fast in the 
matrimonial line until after I got back. He 
assured me he would not and he remained true 
to his word, but just to show that he could 
stir up some excitement in the family, he sailed 
for Venezuela, South America, on December 
9th, where the Great Lakes Steel Company has 
sent him to oversee the erection of some steel 
houses for an oil company there. He will be 
gone until mid-summer. He writes very en' 
thusiastically. He seems so interested in the 
country and his work, although like every 
American who goes to a foreign country, he 
finds the work on a much slower tempo. Al' 
though he is within ten degrees of the Equator, 
he says that they sleep under blankets at night. 
Now I hope all the Millers will stay put for a 
time, as I think we have had enough excite- 
ment since October. 

"I have been thinking a lot about Reunion 
lately. We must make this a very successful 
Reunion, if for no other reason than to show 
the younger generation just how tough our 
'clinging vine' generation can be. 

"Here's hoping for the best one ever." 
1900 
Class Editor and Class Collector: 
Louise Congdon Francis 
(Mrs. Richard S. Francis) 
414 Old Lancaster Road, Haverford, Pa. 

Renee Mitchell Righter has rented her house 
in Princeton for a year. Until June 1st she 
will be in New York at 242 East 72nd Street 
with her daughter Gertrude. After that she 
will be at Vineyard Haven, Mass. 

Constance Rulison is also in New York, 
again at 955 Lexington Avenue. 

Ruth Rockwood has resigned her job in the 



Portland Library, but she still goes to the 
library on Sundays to do some reference work. 
She is editing an important pioneer diary for 
the Oregon Historical Quarterly, working on a 
checklist of Oregon State documents, occa' 
sionally reviewing a Northwest book or two 
for the Frontier and Midland, and working be' 
sides on other activities she is interested in. 
Ruth writes that she has come to the conclu' 
sion that one is busier in retirement than in a 
full'time job. Among other things she has 
taken up weaving with great enthusiasm. 

Louise Norcross Lucas writes from her 
French Chateau on the Cote d'Or on January 
23 rd that "Spring is in the air now. Snow' 
drops and primroses are beginning to show 
their gay little faces in the park, just to remind 
one that this mad world still has some normal 
reactions!" 

1901 

Class Editor and Class Collector: 
Beatrice MacGeorge 
Bettws'yCoed, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

The Class sends affectionate good wishes to 
two young couples. Margaret Woods, Fanny's 
daughter, was married to Gordon Keith, at 
home in Iowa City, on the 27th of August; 
and John Gould, Evelyn Fisk Gould's son, 
married Carmen Lewis, of Houston, Texas, in 
the Chapel of Saint Bartholomew's Church, 
New York City, on the 25th of November. 
John is now Assistant Dramatic Editor of the 
?<[ew Tor\ Times. 

The Class also sends affectionate greetings to 
Josephine Bates, who writes very cheerfully 
that she hopes to come to Reunion, but that 
she is now in the New York Hospital, recover' 
ing from a broken hip. Fifth Avenue's icy 
pavements, alas, were too much for her. 

Peggy Blackwell Mulford also hopes to come 
to Reunion; the double attraction of a married 
son living at Narberth and our thrilling plans 
will bring her from Princeton, we hope. 

Jessie Pelton spent last winter in Egypt and 
Italy. Last autumn she motored to Jackson' 
ville to visit her niece. Now she is back in 
Poughkeepsie, and working hard at the Chil' 
dren's Home, to which she has always been 
devoted. She, too, expects to come to Reunion. 

Mary Allis has a charming water-colour in 
the December exhibition of the Women's Uni' 
versity Club of Philadelphia. Her photographs 
will be exhibited at the Lantern and Lens Club 
in the spring. 

Your Editor is conveniently lodged at the 
gates of the College, and as always, welcomes 
visitors. 

On Wednesday, January 11th, she went to 
Mary Ayer Rousmaniere's for lunch. Mary 
had collected Sadie Towle Moller, Alice 



[20] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Dillingham, Jane Righter, Helen Converse 
Thorpe, Ella Sealy Newell, Evelyn Fisk Gould, 
Elizabeth Masland, Frances Ream Kemmerer, 
and Marion Wright Messimer. After delicious 
lunch we discussed Reunion plans, and ar* 
ranged to send out a letter about our inten' 
tions as soon as possible. Mary's older daugh' 
ter, Polly Gordan, has two children, a boy, 
Albert Franklin, nearly three, a little girl, Mary 
Ayer, born last year. Her younger daughter, 
Frances, made the family a Christmas present 
of a son, Richard Storrs, 3rd. Mary has taken 
up painting, and does enchanting screens and 
landscapes and portraits, copied from old 
prints and photographs. She is a marvel of 
energy and kindness. 

1902 
Class Editor: Elizabeth Chandlee Form an 
(Mrs. Horace Baker Forman, Jr.) 
Haverford, Pa. 
Class Collector: Marion Haines Emlen 
(Mrs. Samuel Emlen) 

Elizabeth Bodine is one of 95 per cent of 
1.902 who insist that their affairs are not of 
sufficient interest to be mentioned! Reluctantly 
she admits that she is still a live wire, teaching 
English ("trying to," she says) in the Trenton 
High School, and having a very happy home 
life with her brother and sister-in-law and 
their thirteen-year-old son, John. "I have had 
some nice trips abroad," she writes, "and one 
memorable summer and fall in Japan. By the 
way, I am probably one of the few members 
of the Class who have lived in the same house 
for fifty years." 

Corinne Blose Wright lives at Douglaston, 
L. I., with her four children. Her two older 
girls graduated from Smith College, and Ann 
and Collier (twins) from Bryn Mawr and 
Harvard, respectively (1936). 

Fanny Cochran's younger daughter, Vif 
ginia, aged thirteen, attends the Baldwin 
School, and the older, Eleanor, is in her first 
year at the School of Industrial Art, Philadel' 
phia. Fanny herself has spent some time in 
Arizona, and loves it so that she is shortly 
returning thither. These brief statements were 
gleaned from Fanny at a meeting in January 
of the Friends' Service Committee, at which 
three distinguished Friends, Rufus M. Jones, 
Robert Yarnall and George Walton, Head' 
master of George School, Pa., reported on their 
recent visit to Germany. 

Maude Sperry Turner (Mrs. Paul N. 
Turner), who came from the University of 
Chicago to spend her junior year at Bryn 
Mawr, will always be remembered for her gay 
friendliness. In generous response to queries, 
she writes from Bronxville, N. Y., of her hus- 
band, her daughter and herself: "Paul is 



counsel for the American Association of Artists 
and Actors, which is an association of stage, 
opera, screen and radio performers. He's also 
Counsel for Actors' Equity and for the Amer- 
ican Federation of Radio Artists. 

"Tibs" (i. e., daughter Tabitha) "has made 
a record for herself at Sarah Lawrence College. 
She is a senior this year in the four-year 
course, majoring in Social Science. In the fall 
she took over a class in Statistics because of 
the enforced absence of an instructor and 
taught the class for several weeks. Teaching 
at Sarah Lawrence at twenty isn't bad, is it! 
Last year she did quite a lot of work with the 
New York Legislative Society and has been 
asked to become a permanent member. 

"For the past two years," Maude continues, 
"I have been conducting a spiritual depart- 
ment in the Pictorial Review under the name 
of Celia Caroline Cole. It is the only spiritual 
department in any woman's magazine and we 
have had a marvelous response. It has been 
an outpouring of the things I believe and have 
tried out as to their efficacy. It is not ortho- 
dox nor does it belong to any Movement; I 
think that's why we've had so many letters, 
from all kinds of people, a great many from 
doctors, ministers, ministers' children, meta- 
physicians, and many, many people who never 
before believed in anything spiritual. 

"It's great fun." 

1903 

Class Editor: Mabel Harriet Norton 

540 W. California St., Pasadena, Calif. 
Class Collector: Caroline F. Wagner 

An interesting and pleasant indication of 
Gertrude Dietrich Smith's return to her former 
health and strength is the news of her election 
as a Republican member of the Connecticut 
General Assembly. In December she spent 
some time with Margretta Stewart Dietrich at 
Santa Fe and, while there, acquired one of 
Elizabeth White's beautiful Afghan hounds. 
She adds, "Whether he or the General Assem- 
bly will take most of my attention remains to 
be seen." 

Louise Atherton Dickey's daughter, Louise, 
who has been studying in Berlin, has left for 
London. She may continue her archaeological 
work elsewhere in Europe. 

Philena Winslow and her mother are spend- 
ing the winter months in New York City. 
When the snow grew too deep in Old Ben- 
nington, Vermont, Charlotte M. Lanagan and 
her husband beat a retreat to Clearwater, 
Florida. Helen Barendt is sojourning in Egypt 
with her niece, and will go to California later 
on. 

Constance L. Todd writes as follows from 
Hotel Holley, New York City. 



[21] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



"Dear 1903! 

"Herewith the short and simple annals of 
this poor for the last two years. 

"After two years in New York (1936-7), 
finding that neither my nervous system nor my 
pocketbook could stand steady living here, I 
gave up my apartment at our Cooperative 
House and decided to live in Hancock, New 
Hampshire — the most unspoilt and gemiithlich 
town in New England, in the Monadnock Re' 
gion in the southern part of the state, and to 
perch in a New York hotel for brief winter 
seasons as exacted by my profession of writing 
as I please and publishing when editors please. 
I write now from the perch (see above), 
where I shall be found Novembers to Mays. 

"Going to the Far East seemed the only way 
to find out what was going on there, and this 
seemed my chance to economize in a pleasant 
and profitable way. So, all unaware of what 
was going to happen the following month, I 
bought a round'trip ticket on a freighter and 
got a passport in June, 1937. Came the war 
next month, and by the time bombs began to 
drop on Shanghai I thought I'd better hurry 
and get my visas. So, from Hancock, I sent 
my passport to the steamship agent, who re' 
turned it, visaed for both China and Japan the 
very day before Chinese visas were suspended. 
And on a pleasant day in September — the day 
the Wichita was stopped — we sailed from Los 
Angeles under the Danish flag with a crew 
that had delayed the boat with their successful 
demand for a war'zone bonus. It was as safe 
as a church, but seemed dramatic with our 
lights, as we approached the Japanese coast, 
playing all night on the huge Danish flag 
painted on the top deck. In a very interesting 
month in Tokyo, meeting the people whose 
dispatches and books we all read, from Hugh 
Byas through Willard Price, Miss Florence 
Wells and Dean Hindmarsh of Harvard, most 
interesting was rediscovering Michi Kawai, 
1904, one of the outstanding women of Japan, 
who has established a school handling the pc 
culiarly difficult problem of the Japanese girls 
returned from America; and I was awfully 
amused when the Baroness Ishimoto — the Mar' 
garet Sanger of Japan — said hesitantly, 'You 
know, she is a Christian.'' The Baroness, who 
later served a jail sentence for the 'Commu' 
nistic' crime of advocating birth control, took 
me to a patriotic meeting, where we helped 
send off propagandist speakers to this country 
to explain the war, and sat, without batting 
an eye, through an activity about which we 
both kept our feelings to ourselves. *Keep your 
eyes and ears very open and your mouth very 
shut. You won't get into any trouble and 
you'll learn a lot,' Miles Vaughn had warned 
me before I left, and it worked. I drank Jap- 



anese ceremonial tea, ate raw fish sitting on my 
shoeless feet on cold stone floors, wandered 
through miles of temples, motored through 
more miles of heavenly, lovely country, found 
the Japanese people courteous, reserved, scru' 
pulously honest, and very likeable. The people 
are in no way to be confused with the war 
party now in the saddle, whose victims, the 
young recruits whose names were drawn for 
the Chinese War, were being sent off midst 
music and cheering — pretty perfunctory look' 
ing demonstrations, I thought. 

"Waiting for a chance for Shanghai to clear 
up so that I could get there, I put in De' 
cember and January in Manila and Hong 
Kong, reached Shanghai in February, and put 
in the spring in Pekin before sailing home 
last May. 

"It was all an enormously interesting, at 
times exhilarating, at times desperately depress- 
ing experience in which I had a sense of par- 
ticipating in history and seeing the last of 
something which never will be seen again. Not 
because I believe the Japanese will win and 
change China. I believe they cannot prevail 
over the timeless and inexhaustible Chinese, 
who will emerge, after a long war, a united 
people, who will push the Western nations out 
of the dominant position they now hold there. 
It was all epitomized to me in my relations to 
my rickshaw boy in Pekin. Lucky people who 
go to Pekin stay with Mrs. Calhoun, the widow 
of our Minister during the Taft administration, 
whom all English'speaking Pekin knows and 
loves as "Mrs. Cal." or "Aunt Lucy." I was 
among the lucky, and she told me I would 
need a rickshaw of my own. Her Number One 
boy procured his brother, with a shiny brass- 
mounted rickshaw and a thick fur robe to keep 
me warm. And all last spring, at the munifi- 
cent prevailing wage of six dollars per month, 
in our money, slender muscular Sun, not much 
older than my own sons, but supporting wife 
and two children on what I paid him, trotted 
cheerfully and skillfully between the shafts, or 
squatted for hours on end on the doorstep, 
awaiting my wishes for ten to twelve hours a 
day while I visited temples and palaces and 
parks and gardens, and lived the gay round of 
idle social life which is the perquisite of the 
West in the Far East. I believe that this war 
will change all that, permanently. And no 
one, by the way, has written so authoritatively 
of the war as our own Anna Louise Strong in 
her little volume, One Fifth of Mankind. She 
was in Hankow, where neither Uncle Sam 
nor my own native cowardice would let me go 
while I was in Hong Kong; and later she was, 
as the book shows, travelling about with her 
old friends among the Eighth Route Army. 
I got all my wisdom from Mr. Timperley, or 



[22] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Edgar Snow, or Hallet Abend, etc., by a bar' 
rage of questions. Only occasionally did I have 
the good fortune to talk with Chinese active 
in the affairs of their country, as when I had 
tea with Madame Sun Yat Sen, and a won' 
derful two days when I 'went native' with the 
staff of the Pacific Digest, Mr. and Mrs. Chen 
Pin Ho and their colleagues, in Hong Kong. 

It is a grand and illuminating experience to 
have behind one. The boys and I spent Christ' 
mas in our little new house in Hancock — we 
managed to get it built last summer, notwith' 
standing the hurricane, which slowed up 
everything in New England — and now it's 
back to college for them (where they wear 
woolen neckties), and to New York for me, 
where I proudly wear cotton stockings visibly 
(and rayon undies invisibly) down Fifth Ave 
nue; and many hours of work to get Congress 
to embargo war materials — scrap iron, gasoline, 
etc., to Japan. A voluntary boycott of silk, 
and a legal embargo on materials that feed the 
war could change the situation in a week. So, 
wear rayon, and write your congressman! 

"My oldest boy, David, is in the Harvard 
Graduate School, aspiring to become a Ph.D. 
-in chemistry — bio'chemistry, not poison gas. 
My youngest, Alden, is a senior at Swarth' 
more and very active in the Student Union. 

"For classmates, and Bryn Mawr contem' 
poraries, I've been playing in Boston with 
Anne Sherwin and Helen Robinson. The Sher' 
wins are the most interesting and hospitable 
household in the world — four generations of 
them, in their roomy Beacon Street house, 
make things pleasant for my David, Eunice 
Hale's Eunice, junior, and many other young 
people. 

"Helen Robinson has a charming little tea' 
room in warm weather at Intervale, New 
Hampshire; you can always get good food and 
buy attractive gifts at La Chalet. I week'ended 
with Gertrude Dietrich Smith in the midst of 
her campaign for the legislature, when she 
worked like the devil — and had a calm week' 
end with her later when she had won her 
Republican seat. She is well as she has not 
been in years. 

"I think this is all. Let me end with one 
omitted item from Pekin — one heavenly peace 
ful weekend I spent with Alice Boring in her 
enchanting house at Yenching University, ten 
miles outside the city walls, visiting temples in 
the Western Hills Sunday, a la Pekin Picnic, 
between guerilla battles, as it were. Of her 
guests at dinner Saturday night, I shall never 
forget the young Chinese professor whom we 
finally coaxed into talking of his country. His 
tongue once loosened, he talked on and on as 
only a patriot of very deep feeling can; and 
let me close with his very telling phrase, which 



seemed prophetic — 'History will show of this 
era,' he said, 'that China is a very hot potato 
in the scorched hand of Japan.' " 

1904 
Class Editor: Emma O. Thompson 

320 South 42nd St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Class Collector: Isabel M. Peters 

Esther Sinn Neuendorffer writes that her 
oldest son Joe is a senior at Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, her daughter Ruth is 
a junior at the University of Chicago, and 
very active in the Chapel Union and Y. W. 
C. A. The other boys are still in high school; 
one son and a nephew will graduate in the 
spring. 

1905 

Class Editor: Eleanor Little Aldrich 
(Mrs. Talbot Aldrich) 
59 Mount Vernon St., Boston, Mass. 

Class Collector: 

Margaret Nichols Hardenbergh 
(Mrs. Clarence M. Hardenbergh) 

1906 

Class Editor: Louise Cruice Sturdevant 
(Mrs. Edward W. Sturdevant) 
3006 P St., Washington, D. C. 

Class Collector: 

Elizabeth Harrington Brooks 
(Mrs. Arthur S. Brooks) 

1907 
Class Editor and Class Collector: 
Alice M. Hawkins 
Low Buildings, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Harriot Houghteling Curtis and her husband 
are spending this winter away from Labrador. 
Recently for the first time since her marriage 
she and Tink Meigs met in Washington — 
where Harriot was visiting her brother Law' 
rence, who, by the way, is none other than 
James L. Houghteling, United States Com- 
missioner of Immigration. No doubt the rest 
of you are smarter, but it took us some time 
to realize that the dangerous radical who has 
figured in some Congressional speeches was the 
same brother Lawrence whose Yale exploits 
used to seem so fascinating to 1907 as fresh- 
men. 

Julie Benjamin Howson quite naturally ob' 
jects to our giving the idea that her chief inter- 
est is painless elimination. Actually, she is 
busy and useful along so many lines that even 
a place as big as New York feels her influence. 
Her "main job at present" — note the quotes — 
is being president of the Sara Clapp Midtown 
Council of Social Agencies, an organization 
formed in 1937 to prevent duplication and 
overlapping of the various agencies concerned 



[23] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



with the health and welfare of the part of 
New York situated east of Fifth Avenue be' 
tween 14th and 59th Streets. 

A recent article in the l^lew Yor\ Times 
dealing with the growing importance of med' 
ical-social work, as medicine becomes inevitably 
more specialized and de-personalized, quotes 
authorities in the field as calling Antoinette 
Cannon "the best'informed individual in New 
York on the profession." 

Fortunately there are a few of us who are 
not bowed down with responsibilities and can 
therefore keep abreast of the world in other 
ways. Among our winter travellers are May 
Ballin, who is trying out the "Silver Meteor" 
to get herself to her brother's home in Florida, 
and who plans to take in the Charleston gar- 
dens on her way home. 

In case any of you missed reading it in the 
newspapers, we pass on the good word that 
Peggy Ayer Barnes and her co-author Edward 
Sheldon won their suit against Metro-Gold- 
wyn-Mayer, whom they had accused of plag- 
iarism in connection with a movie which the 
courts now have proved was based on their 
play, Dishonest Lady. 

1908 

Class Editor: Mary Kinsley Best 
(Mrs. William Henry Best) 
1198 Bushwick Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Class Collector: Eleanor Rambo 

Grace Woodelton Smith, in Waco, Texas, is 
still planning to build "that house in the coun- 
try." "You should see my farmer husband 
on his pony! We've added turkeys to the 
livestock, and every once in so often we put 
cows or pigs in the trailer and take them to 
market in Fort Worth." This from our so- 
phisticated former New Yorker! 

Anna Carrere is a farmer, too. "I'm dairy- 
farming and love it! I find it a full-time job 
and hope some day to make it pay!" (Punc- 
tuation is hers. — Ed.) She appears to have 
streamlined her name to Ann, judging from 
her attractive Christmas card, and the name of 
her farm is, Ann's Acres, address R. F. D. 2, 
Havre de Grace, Md. 

Thanks to an unexpected but welcome tip 
from Emily Fox Cheston (bless her!) your 
Editor managed to obtain from Jacqueline 
Morris Evans a restrained travelogue of the 
Evans family, all six of them, last summer. 
"Following four delightful weeks in Scandi- 
navia, we spent three more touring the High- 
lands of Scotland, and three more in England. 
In Norway we were caught in a hail storm on 
the shore of a small mountain lake at Nord- 
seter. Three Norwegian girls, who were spend- 
ing their holiday in a hut on the mountain, 



hospitably rescued us and gave us shelter. For 
two hours they practiced their surprisingly 
good English on us, and when the storm had 
somewhat abated they climbed on up the moun- 
tain with us, accompanying us all the way to 
our car, to see us off. We left them with a 
happy recollection of warm-heartedness, re- 
sponsiveness and kindly hospitality, so typical 
of the Scandinavian folk. 

"In Scotland we travelled in a baby Austin 
holding two, and a Morris 14 for the remain- 
ing four, picnicking along the way, in Evans 
fashion, for we were unusually fortunate to 
have good weather. We fell in love with Skye 
and all the northwestern coast of Scotland, had 
a memorable meal in a fisherman's hut near 
Fraserburgh on the eastern coast, and then one 
of the best days of all watching the sheep-dog 
trials at Keith. All through Scandinavia and 
Great Britain I collected flowers in the bogs 
and heaths, saw birds to my heart's content, 
and even brought home a box of pebbles, in 
spite of many family protests. I can wish no- 
body a jollier, more altogether delightful and 
educational experience than ours!" (Of course, 
all of us do not have Rhodes scholar sons to be 
visited and so give us an excuse for going 
abroad. — Ed.) 

By the way, Jack further reports that Emily 
Fox Cheston is giving "an awfully good 
course" of eight lectures on the appreciation 
of art, to the evening classes attended by some 
of the parents of the Germantown Friends 
School. Furthermore, says Jack, Emily gives 
"eagerly-listened-to talks" on horticulture — 
plants, trees or shrubs, treated from a scientific 
or a historical point of view. Last summer 
Emily served on the committee in charge of 
the Deanery Garden. 

Evelyn Gardner and Mabel Frehafer went 
to Alaska last summer, and later Mabel visited 
Evelyn in California. Thereby, I am sure, 
hangs another tale! 

Louise Foley Finerty, who has been away 
for a year or so, is now back in Alexandria, 
Va., for the winter. Her address is 208 N. 
Fairfax Street. 

Posey Payton (Rose Marsh to us) expects 
to attend the Uniting Conference for Amer- 
ican Methodism at Kansas City, Missouri, in 
April, with her delegate husband, Dr. Jacob 
Simpson Payton, editor of the National Meth 
odist Press. 

1909 

Class Editor: Anna Elizabeth Harlan 
357 Chestnut St., Coatesville, Pa. 

Class Collector: Evelyn Holt Lowry 
(Mrs. Holt Lowry) 

After postponements, which happily allowed 
Mary and her husband to spend Christmas 



[24] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



with their children, Rev. and Mrs. Charles L. 
Storrs sailed on January 27th from San Fran- 
cisco on the President Taft. Their address will 
be Shaowu, Fukien, China, via Hong Kong. 
This is the first time Mary has left all four 
children in America. The headquarters of the 
two sons and two daughters will be their 
aunt's home, Earnley, near West Chester, Pa. 
Ruth Wade Fitzsimmons writes from Helena, 
Montana: "The thrill of 1938 for me was the 
experience of being on the Carleton campus 
with Jean, my daughter, for ten days in June 
as member of the faculty of the Diocesan 
Summer School for Church Workers — two 
classes, one for the women, the other for high 
school and college students. I loved it, and 
am happy to know I am to go again next 
year when Jean graduates." 

1910 

Class Editor: Izette Taber de Forest 
(Mrs. Alfred V. de Forest) 
88 Appleton St., Cambridge, Mass. 

Class Collector: Frances Hearne Brown 
(Mrs. Robert B. Brown) 

Susanne Allinson Wulsin writes: "A happy 
family, like a happy nation, doesn't seem to 
have much news that's of interest outside the 
family circle. We are here (163 George 
Street, Providence, R. I.) and love to see our 
friends." Providence is near enough for me 
to be hopeful of seeing Susanne sooner or 
later, for the first time since 1910. 

Mary Boyd Shipley Mills and her husband 
are at the Choate School, Wallingford, Conn. 
Their two sons, Jack and Shipley, are in the 
school; their daughter, Anna, is spending the 
winter in Haverford with Mary's mother, for 
her senior year at the Shipley School. Next 
year Jack and Anna will be in college. "With 
both boys in school dormitories, and we our- 
selves eating at school, I have no children, no 
housekeeping, and no job, but I manage to 
keep busy; and now am enjoying having all 
the family together for the holidays. At pres- 
ent I am only 'married, with no paid occupa- 
tion.' Greetings!" 

Betty Tenney Cheney and Frances Hearne 
Brown were both at home when we visited 
our Chicago children during Christmas week. 
I saw both of Betty's daughters, but not the 
grand-daughter, who was asleep. Janie, back 
from Sarah Lawrence for the vacation, had had 
her coming'out party on the 26th of Decem- 
ber; and Betty was getting her breath after 
the combination of that and Christmas. 
Marion, my daughter-in'law, and I lunched 
with Frances, and met her younger daughter, 
Frances, who is prospecting for a college, and 
her younger son, Bob, who after Kenyon Col- 



lege, plans to enter medical school. Frances' 
niece, Esther Hearne, Bryn Mawr 1938, was 
also at lunch. 

Last Sunday, Jane Smith had supper with 
us and filled our hearts and minds with delight 
and interest in all that she is doing and plan- 
ning for Adult Education, under the W. P. A., 
all over the United States; and for the new 
Hudson Shore School for women workers in 
industry. This latter is to function all the 
year round and is to be located at Jane's fam- 
ily's large place on the Hudson. We must all 
take special interest in this newest of Jane's 
undertakings, as the Bryn Mawr School is to 
be a part of the Hudson Shore School and we 
will thus have a finger in the pie. Jane had 
news of Marion Parris Smith, who is now 
living in Portland, Maine; and we talked over 
the grand days of Political Economy under 
"Miss Parris," and the exciting and inspiring 
class discussions of social trends. My own 
constant and continuing fascination in all 
things sociological I owe to "Miss Parris,'" 
and I am certain that all who were in her 
classes feel the same gratitude to her. 

1911 

Class Editor: Elizabeth Taylor Russell 
(Mrs. John F. Russell, Jr.) 
1085 Park Ave., New York City 

Class Collector: Anna Stearns 

1912 

Class Editor: Margaret Thackray Weems 
(Mrs. Philip Weems) 
9 Southgate Ave., Annapolis, Md. 

Class Collector: Mary Peirce 

The Class extends warm sympathy to Peggy 
Peck McEwan, whose father, Judge Epaphrc 
ditus Peck, of Bristol, Connecticut, died in 
November. 

Irma Shloss Mannheimer writes: "The only 
1912 news I know is about myself, and being 
a modest woman I hesitate to mention the fact 
that I am putting in a very busy but happy 
year being president of the Des Moines Worn' 
en's Club (over 1,200 members) and am en' 
joying it hugely. My older boy graduates 
from Grinnell College (in Iowa) in June and 
will go on with the study of law. This makes 
me feel old, but maybe some of the 'girls' are 
grandmothers now, are they?" 

Peggy Peck McEwan has supplied the fol- 
lowing news: "Helen Lautz was in Evanston 
this fall to attend the wedding of her niece, 
who lived with Ruth Lauts Cunningham, 1915. 
As Helen was here for two weeks, several of 
us in the vicinity saw her and heard about her 
travels. She mentioned seeing Margaret War- 
ner Smith, who she said hadn't changed a bit. 



[25] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Margaret prefers to send her daughters to 
school abroad in Switzerland, rather than in 
Princeton. 

Biffy Heffern Groton wrote that through 
her son, Nat, Jr., who is with the United Air' 
lines, she flew to California and back in four 
days, just for the ride, and found it a thrilling 
experience. 

A note from Helen Colter Pierson at 
Christmas time said that her oldest two, Col- 
ter and Margaret, are married, and Colter 
has a baby daughter, Patsy, so Helen is a 
grandmother. Aaron is in the Senior Class of 
Washington University. There are also Stuart, 
sixteen, Dan, fourteen, and Polly, nine." 

News from your Class Editor, who has been 
travelling, has come into the Alumnae Office. 
She writes: "After a very busy November (in 
which I attended my brother's wedding in 
Johnstown) and December (in which my 
daughter made her debut in Washington), Van 
and I took to the trail and headed for Florida, 
with Miami Beach and Air Races the objective. 

After that we trekked out to Pensacola, on 
to Mobile, New Orleans and San Antonio, 
Texas, winding up with Hot Springs as the 
final touch in "rest cure"- — so you see why 
I'd have no class news. 

I missed Cornelia Skinner's visit to Annap- 
olis and just missed seeing Johnnie Allen 
Andrew's ('11) on several turns of the trip 
(she has a house in Key West), and was 
helpless as to addresses of any Bryn Mawrtyrs. 
I am following this letter North very soon — 
heading through Memphis and Nashville, and 
back home early in February. Thanks to Peggy 
Peck for this month's news." 

1913 
Class Editor: Lucile Shadburn Yow 

(Mrs. Jones Yow) 

385 Lancaster Ave., Haverford, Pa. 
Class Collector: Helen Evans Lewis 

(Mrs. Robert M. Lewis) 

1914 

Class Editor: Evelyn Shaw McCutcheon 
(Mrs. John T. McCutcheon) 
2450 Lakeview Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Class Collector: Mary Christine Smith 
1915 

Class Editor: Margaret L. Free Stone 
(Mrs. James Austin Stone) 
3039 44th St., Washington, D. C. 

Class Collector: Mildred Jacobs Coward 
(Mrs. Jacobs Coward) 
Mary Gertrude Brownell Wilson and her 

family are now living in Washington, D. C, 

where her husband teaches at the Landon 

School. 



Merle Sampson Toll had an "at home" on 
the day before Christmas at her perfectly de- 
lightful old place 'way out the Old George- 
town Road in Bethesda, Md. Peggy Stone, 
knowing she wouldn't be able to get there in 
the afternoon, dropped in on Merle in the 
morning and found her most charming family 
all taking part in the preparations and having 
a very jolly time doing it! Merle and her 
lovely daughter were preparing the food, so 
Peggy sat down and visited with them, not to 
mention sampling the different kinds of deli- 
cious sandwiches. 

The following most interesting letter was 
received from Anne Hardon Pearce, East 
Palatka, Florida, during the Christmas rush, 
and the editor apologizes most profoundly both 
to Anne and to the Class for not having sent 
it on immediately so that it would have been 
printed in the February Bulletin. 

"With regret I notice that there is no news 
of 1915 in the December Bulletin. Pos- 
sibly if the whole class were as moved as I 
when this state of affairs exists, they might be 
moved to contribute their news. Mine is 
varied and touches 1914 and 1916. 

"But to start at the beginning. Last spring 
both my children graduated from school. 
Nancy finished at Brenau Academy and Basil 
at Riverside Military Academy, both in 
Gainesville, Georgia. Nancy was the Class 
Historian, and Basil was in the upper ten. He 
had broken his leg in February and was out 
of school for six weeks, so we thought that he 
did very well to catch up. 

"Then on the Fourth of July we put Nancy 
on the bus to go to Miami to visit a school 
friend; she hopped off at Orlando, took the 
train to Baltimore, and was married to Carl 
Johnson, of Wilton, Conn. She had met him 
the summer before when she and I visited my 
mother, and he spent the Christmas vacation 
with us. So it was not a complete surprise, 
although I had hoped that they would wait 
until Nancy had had at least two years of 
college. However, they are as happy as a bug 
in a rug, and that is the main thing. 

"Basil went to work this summer for the 
Florida Power and Light Co., and my husband 
decided that he would take a trip to the 
West Coast to stimulate the sale of our canned 
potatoes. I suggested that not he but WE 
drive out, and we did. A grand trip, too, via 
New Orleans, where we dined in state at 
Antoine's, then climbed to the tower of Huey 
Long's $5,000,000 Capitol, Shreveport, the oil 
wells of Longview, Texas, Dallas, Fort Worth, 
Grand Canyon, Boulder Dam, Los Angeles. 
Before leaving I had pored over the Alumnae 
Register and found that Lydia Mark MacDon- 
ald (1915) was in Pasadena, and at once I 



[26] 






BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



wrote to her. We met for lunch, and although 
I had not seen her in twenty five years (perish 
the thought), I knew her at once. She hasn't 
even grayed around the temples as I have, and 
her girlish figure is intact. And what's more, 
she has three sons, all over six feet tall! I 
spent another most interesting day with her, 
almost seeing Isabel Smith, who makes all the 
wheels go round at Scripps College, going out 
to a school for Mexican boys and girls at 
Padua Hills, and visiting the Huntington Es- 
tate. Her husband and mine joined us for 
dinner at her charming home. Of course, the 
Legion Convention caught up with us, and we 
saw many of the screen stars. 

"Then we moved on to San Francisco and 
there I called Larie Klein Boas. She came at 
once, remembering the name of Anne Hardon, 
but not having the faintest idea what she looked 
like, but I spotted her at once. The merry 
way that she took the hills in San Francisco 
while talking steadily and waving in all direc- 
tions made my hair curl. Finally she parked 
by a fire-hydrant without even having a barrel 
to turn over it, and took me up to her apart- 
ment, telling the door-man to move the car. 
, It is a fascinating place overlooking San Fran- 
cisco Bay and the Golden Gate, and filled with 
etchings and a colorful old priest's robe, an 
icon and other beautiful things that she 
brought back from Russia. Eleanor Allen 
Mitchum (1914) was to join us on the trip, 
but was prevented and asked me to lunch at 
her club the next day. Ellie couldn't show the 
advancing years because she rides horseback 
and her hair and face just aren't the kind to 
show. She had used our potatoes on a camp- 
ing trip, and that gave me a thrill. 

"We stayed in San Francisco five days and 
then moved on to Portland, Seattle, Grand 
Coulee Dam, the ranch in Wyoming where I 
had stayed in 1915, and finally Chicago. As 
we had stayed ten days in Los Angeles and 
five in San Francisco, I thought that we would 
be at least a week in Chicago, and I had the 
names and addresses of so many Bryn Mawr- 
tyrs that I hoped to see. But it happened that 
the day that we got there my husband could 
and did see the broker he had come all that 

Iway to contact, and as we had by then been 
away from home almost six weeks and were 
anxious to get back, we left the following 
morning. In Nashville I almost saw Katherine 
Dodd (1914) and Margaret Dodd Sangree 
(1916), but it was a heavenly day, and 
although I called the house and went to the 
hospital they must have chosen that moment 
to go to their camp. 
"Soon after we got back, my Cocker pre- 
sented me with six beautiful pups — three 
blacks and three reds — sired by the grandson 



of an international champion. When she was 
a tiny pup her hip had been broken, and 
although it had healed successfully we had to 
perform a Caesarean. Needless to say, I am 
their foster-mother and have had to feed and 
nurse them since the first two weeks, when 
she dumped them in my lap. Yesterday I sold 
one, and it was like parting with a member 
of the family. 

"Tomorrow I start the fruit on its way 
north, and between it and the pups and the 
Welfare Board, and incidentally Christmas, I 
shall be even busier than usual. 

"Of course, a recent deluge ruined my sweet 
peas, but the narcissus, three different kinds, 
are a riot of bloom and the house full of their 
fragrance. Even the azaleas are beginning to 
bloom, and (Florida tourists please note) our 
beautiful Ravine Gardens will soon be a gor- 
geous sight. 

"That seems to be all the news that I can 
think of at the moment, but I do wish that 
some one else would be similarly inspired, so 
that I can know what the rest of you have 
been doing." 

1916 

Class Editor: Catherine S. Godley 
2873 Observatory Ave., Hyde Park 
Cincinnati, Ohio 

Class Collector: Helen Robertson 

It is with sorrow that we record the death 
of Agnes Smith on December 2, 1938. Agnes 
taught her classes at St. Timothy's as usual 
on December 2nd and was preparing to drive 
to Winchester to spend the week-end with 
her sister. She suffered a severe stroke and 
died a few hours later without regaining con- 
sciousness. Word of her death came as a 
great shock to her old friends and to the 
many new friends she had made during her 
long association with St. Timothy's as head 
of the mathematics department. Those of us 
who knew her will deeply miss her serene and 
humorous outlook on life, her liberal but firm 
convictions, and her tireless concern for her 
pupils, her friends and her family. 

1917 

Class Editor: Bertha C. Greenough 

203 Blackstone Blvd., Providence, R. L. 
Class Collector: Dorothy Shipley White 
(Mrs. Thomas Raeburn White) 

Our deepest sympathy is extended to 
Eleanora Wilson Peacock, whose father died 
in January after a short illness. He had been 
head of the Department of Zoology in the 
University of North Carolina for forty-five 
years, and was an international authority on 
cell dissociation and regeneration. 

Turn to page twenty-four of the January 



[27] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



23 rd number of Life and you will see pictures 
of "Scientist Katharine Blodgett" dipping 
glass and making it disappear like magic. 
She is certainly doing a fascinating thing and 
has our heartiest congratulations on her 
achievements. 

1918 
Class Editor: 

Mary'Safford Mumford Hoogewerff 

(Mrs. Hiester Hoogewerff) 

179 Duke of Gloucester St. 

Annapolis, Md. 
Class Collector: Harriett Hobbs Haines 

(Mrs. W. Howard Haines) 

1919 
Class Editor: Frances Clarke Darling 
(Mrs. H. Maurice Darling) 
12 Lee Place, Bronxville, N. Y. 
Class Collector: 

Mary Thurman Martin, pro tern. 
(Mrs. Millard W. Martin) 

The Class extends its sympathy to Emily 
Mat? Boyd, whose mother died in November 
after a trying illness. 

A Christmas card from Anna Reubenia 
Dubach brings the news that she left Denver 
in September to take a job in Saint Louis 
which did not work out. She then came on 
to Washington for Christmas and was visiting 
friends and hoping for a job in the East. 

Another item brought in by a Christmas 
letter was of a most interesting trip of Betty 
Biddle Yarnall's. She and her husband spent 
the summer in Vienna working for the Friends 
Service Committee, endeavoring to evacuate 
non'Aryans and to "nurture the smouldering 
remains of Quakerism under a totalitarian 
state.'" Dr. Mary O'Neil Hawkins appeared 
at their office on their first day. Betty's hus' 
band, D. Robert Yarnall, has just returned 
from a trip to Germany as a member of a 
special mission representing the Friends, to 
discuss with the German Government the care 
of refugees. 

Catharine Taussig Opie writes from Eng' 
land: "We hope to get over next summer. I 
still teach three days a week and somehow 
Spanish refugee problems take up time though 
I am not very active." 

1920 
Class Editor: Teresa James Morris 

(Mrs. Edward K. Morris) 

4950 Hillbrook Lane, Washington, D. C. 
Class Collector: Josephine Herrick 

I am reminded of the early days of our 
reports to the Bulletin, when we were young 
alumnae — for I can announce a marriage and 
a birth. Mrs. Frances Winants (Dolly Bonsai) 
and Stuart Bryce Wing, according to the New 



York Tribune, obtained a marriage license and 
said they planned to be married January 12th. 
Mr. Wing is a well-known sportsman and a 
former Master of the Harford Hunt Club. 

The birth is that of Stephen Francis, son of 
Jean Justice Collins, and it took place on 
February 12, 1938. The other two boys were 
also born on holidays, which, Jean says, must 
be some sort of a record. "We are on the 
direct way to Atlantic City" (426 Bellevue 
Avenue, Hammonton, New Jersey). "I should 
love to see any of the Class who might be 
driving through. You can easily find me by 
the wash on the line. I am planning to have 
safety pins engraved on my tombstone." 

Katharine Thomas Stallman and Lois Par- 
sons MacLaughlin each have one son, and are 
busy bringing them up properly. Katharine 
writes that she is "Chairman of the local 
Bryn Mawr Group which just gave a most sue- 
cessful musicale." Lois, I hesitate to report, 
writes that she "plays the horses." As both 
Lois and Katharine live in Columbus, I trust 
Katharine will keep Lois very busy working 
for the Bryn Mawr Group so that she will 
have less time for the horses. But who am I 
to talk? 

Does anyone know the whereabouts of 
Margaret Train (Mrs. Boris Samsonoff)? 

1921 
Class Editor: Elizabeth Cecil Scott 

(Mrs. Frederick R. Scott) 

1823 Park Avenue, Richmond, Virginia 
Class Collector: 

Katharine Walker Bradford 

(Mrs. Lindsay Bradford) 
Helen Farrell is painting at the Ringling Art 
School at Sarasota, Florida, until April. She 
gives her address, until December 31, 1939, as 
P. O. Box 1755, Sarasota. 

1922 
Class Editor: Katherine Peek 

Rosemont College, Rosemont, Pa. 
Class Collector: 

Katherine Stiles Harrington 

(Mrs. Carroll Harrington) 

1923 

Class Editor: Isabelle Beaudrias Murray 
(Mrs. William D. Murray) 
284 N. Broadway, Yonkers, N. Y. 

Class Collector: Frances Matteson Rath bun 
(Mrs. Lawrance Rathbun) 

1924 
Class Editor: Mary Emily Rodney Brinser 
(Mrs. Donald C. Brinser) 
85 Washington St., East Orange, N. J. 
Class Collector: Molly Angell McAlpin 
(Mrs. William R. McAlpin) 
The Class joins in extending to Connie 



[28] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Lewis Gibson deepest sympathy on the death 
within a year of both her father and her 
mother. 

My long silent treatment didn't accomplish 
much in the way of bringing in news — and I 
had such high hopes! The grapevine system 
has, however, brought in complaints about our 
blank spaces. If only someone else will send 
in the news, we all love to read it. Oh, well, 
I got myself into this, so here I go with a 
vengeance. The spring season is my lighter 
one in a business way. I'm off on a telephone 
and letter campaign that will give everyone a 
chance to tell all she ever heard or imagined. 

Remember that Bess Pearson Horrocks up 
and moved from Philadelphia to Scranton all 
of a sudden last winter? No sooner was she 
approximately settled than she pulled up 
stakes again. This time it was only a twelve' 
mile saunter, out of Scranton to Waverly — 
Box 185, if you have the writing urge — still 
Pennsylvania. 

Elsa Molitor Vanderbilt and her husband 
are reported to be the rage of Toledo. He's 
in the advertising field, if you recall, and 
advertising publications have been pointing to 
him with pride. Rumour has it that he writes 
popular songs on the side. 

Betsy Crowell Kaltenthaler has a new home 
in Wynnewood. Betsy the younger, our Class 
baby, is a student at the Baldwin School. 

Beth Tuttle Wilbur describes herself as "in' 
curably athletic. I have a sport for each sea' 
son — hockey in the fall, squash in winter, 
lacrosse in the spring and tennis in the sum' 
mer!" Beth has been playing on the United 
States lacrosse team, the Southeastern sectional 
hockey team, and has been presidenting the 
Philadelphia Field Hockey Association. She 
managed the national tournament when it was 
held at the Merion Cricket Club last Thanks' 
giving. With all that full program, she claims 
that her real activities are at home, and that 
exercise just keeps the cobwebs out of her 
brain. Beth has three children — Betsy, twelv 
ish, who wants to be a toe dancer and is study 
ing dancing diligently; Elliott, nineish, just a 
boy and "loose in his clothes," and Reed, 
fourish. 

From Europe news floats in that as long ago 
as the fall of 1936 Roberte Godefroy Chauvel 
took in hand her father'in'law's business, 
which put Roberte and her husband at the 
head of two pharmaceutical affairs. Anne, 
Roberte' s youngest, is going on two. "As you 
see," concluded Roberte, "I am a frightfully 
busy woman with my laboratory work and my 
household duties." It would be grand if some' 
one Europe'bound would check up on her 
activities and give us a firsthand report. 
Bee Constant is now Mrs. Walter Rumsey 



Marvin. It was a June wedding. After a 
summer in England and Scotland, Bee is back 
at the Spence School teaching English 7 and 8, 
and Rumsey is carrying on as President of the 
Knickerbocker Federal Savings Loan Associa' 
tion. Hope my scribbled notes are right on 
that one! 

Kitty Gallwey Holt has moved from the 
outskirts of Morristown to Bernardsville, New 
Jersey. 

Silvia Saunders is a photographer special' 
izing in gardens. She also is a member of the 
Cantata Singers. 

Betty Ives Bartholet has two boys, in case 
you didn't know. The Bartholets have a new 
country place at Brewster, New York. 

Tots Gardner Butterworth has a third son. 
Those who see her on her infrequent trips to 
New York report that four men don't seem to 
stop her much. 

Jean Palmer did another western motoring 
trip last summer, with Lus Taylor, 1921, and 
the same third party — a stranger to us — who 
all went through the Indian country together 
a while back. This time they concentrated on 
Wyoming, Montana and Idaho. 

Martha Cooke Steadman also has three boys. 
If I get the story straight, Martha had a great 
deal to do with the development of the Hono' 
lulu Museum of Art. Not only was she an in' 
stigator but she personally took charge of the 
cataloguing, helped supervise the architectural 
plans, and what have you. It seems Martha's 
grandmother left quite a substantial collection 
for the museum. 

Lou Sanford Pearson did active work again 
last summer with the Onteora Green Room 
Players. She claims to have spent a great deal 
of the time acquiring the proper Southern 
drawl and mannerisms for In Old Kentuc\y. 
I hear the head of the Macmillan Publishing 
Company thought her quite the counterpart 
of Margaret Mitchell, who, it seems, is a so' 
called typical Southern charmer. 

1925 

Class Editor: Elizabeth Mallett Conger 
(Mrs. Frederic Conger) 
Dongan Hills, Staten Island, N. Y. 

Class Collector: Allegra Woodworth 

We have the most shy and diffident class' 
mates in the world. Each one has to be gently 
drawn out. At last Ebbie (Marion Eberbach) 
writes: "I was married on June 19, 1937, to 
Kennith Ravenscroft Balsley, who is co'head 
of the English Department of the Episcopal 
Academy. Just a month earlier I had taken 
the preliminary for my Ph.D. at the Univer' 
sity of Pennsylvania. We planned to spend 



[29] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



part of the summer in Glacier Park, but house' 
hunting proved more difficult than we had 
expected and finally left us in possession of 
a former rectory just off the campus of 
Swarthmore College. 'The Ark,' as we call it, 
is Swarthmore'Swiss'Gothic outside, and had 
remained practically unchanged within since 
the eighteen-nineties, so we devoted what was 
left of our vacation to removing olive green 
and dark red wallpaper, fearful and wonderful 
chandeliers, and other Victorian relics. 

"Last winter I did nothing notable except 
a little music, played viola in a small group at 
the Women's University Club, discovered the 
Swarthmore Symphony Orchestra, and joined 
the Montgomery Singers for a part of their 
season. We spent the summer at the farm in 
Connecticut, had a flying visit with Merle 
Whitcomb the day before she sailed for Nor- 
way in September. Nothing to report this 
year except the acquisition of some new thesis 
material, which so far has not received much 
attention." 

From Brownie (Miriam Brown Vanderveer) 
we hear: "I am teaching at Garrison Forest 
(Maryland), running our very own house in 
spare moments and having the very new 
experience of managing two children, aged 
ten and eleven. I wish I could tell you that 
they were mine and I'd just forgotten to write 
you about them, but unfortunately they have 
only been 'loaned' to me by the school, which 
was too full to hold them. They have com' 
pletely rejuvenated our household, aside from 
bringing back to my mind a great deal of 
sixth'grade arithmetic." 

We hear that Tibby Lawrence Mendell has 
passed her Sorbonne Ph.D. examinations. 

Every letter that ever comes to us begins 
with so many apologies that we should like to 
discuss at length the question of what is news. 
(Maybe next month.) We contend that life 
does not have to be dramatic to be interesting 
or even to be interesting reading. And any 
way are you sure you always recognize history 
in the making? (See below — from the Febru' 
ary Ladies' Home Journal, an excerpt from an 
article, "Dated Coiffures":) 

"1925: Subjects of general agitation: The 
Florida boom and the crossword puzzle. Bryn 
Mawr lifts ban on students' smoking." 

1926 

Class Editor: Janet C. Preston 
Kenwood, Catonsville, Md. 

Class Collector: Mary Tatnall Colby 
(Mrs. I. Gordon Colby) 

Congratulations to Eleanor Hess Kurzman 
on the birth of Paul Alfred on November 



25th. He is the Kurzman's fourth child and 
third son. Isn't it wonderful to get informa' 
tion straight from headquarters and not to 
have to rely on rumour! We do appreciate it, 
Eleanor, and we wish there were more like 
you. 

Another person we are grateful to is Miriam 
Lewis, who sent us a welcome sheaf of news 
in January. She says: 

"I haven't yet seen — that I remember — any 
mention of David Smith, Rummy Mucken* 
houpt Smith's adorable boy, who is all curls 
and dimples and mischief. Statistics I leave 
to her but I thin\ he is around two, now. 
They live in a really country place, R. D. 1, 
Rockwell Lane, Darien, Connecticut, and need 
only cross the road to do their ice skating. 
They built the house to suit their fancy — as 
all dream houses should be built. . . . 

"I am still in Curtis Research but have in 
some unpremeditated way come to be termed 
Research Librarian and am a member of the 
Special Libraries Council of Philadelphia — a 
local chapter of the national. Curtis sent me 
to the New York conference and I hope to 
go to the next one in Baltimore." 

Miriam is also on the faculty of the Geth' 
semane School of Christian Education, where 
she is Instructor in Art in Religious Educa' 
tion, and gives occasional talks around Phila' 
delphia. She has just had some more poetry 
published in the Lutheran Anthology and some 
in the latest Caravan of Verse. She is also 
going to do some writing for the Lutheran 
News Bureau. In her spare time she gets in 
interesting trips: 

"I went up to French River, Canada, again 
last summer, to my uncle's summer home on 
an island there, and took a side trip alone, 
200 miles farther north to Lake Temagami. 
Saw Hudson Bay trading post there and miles 
of gorgeous scenery and wild life — log huts 
and even sod huts— oxcarts, of course — and 
on our own island at night we could hear 
the wolves howl and the loons laugh. . . . 
One reason I wanted to go to Lake Temagami 
was because my uncle had said on my last visit 
to French River that it wasn't safe for a girl 
to go alone — so, of course, I had to go see! 
It was very tame, though — not even as wild 
as French River." 

1927 

Class Editor: Ruth Rickaby Darmstadt 
(Mrs. Louis J. Darmstadt) 
179 East 79th St., New York City 

Class Collector: Dorothy Irwin Headly 
(Mrs. John F. Headly) 

Agnes Newhall Stillwell very kindly wrote 
me recently and pointed out an error I had 



[30] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



made. Her youngest child's name is Theodora 
not Theodore. (Agnes uses that very sophis- 
ticated and adult e at the end of words, which 
baffles your naive Editor.) Theodora is now 
ten months old and so will probably enter the 
Class of 1961. Agnes also has a son, almost 
three years old, as you remember. 

Darcy Kellogg Thomas has a brand-new 
daughter, born on New Year's Eve. Mary 
Darcy is the third child; she has a brother, 
four, and a sister, two. I called on Darcy 
while she was at the Doctor's Hospital and 
viewed Mary Darcy through the glass nursery 
door. She is a very winning cherub indeed 
and seemed to be the pride of the nursery, 
according to several nurses and a doctor. 

Beatrice Simcox is a case worker with the 
Institute of Family Service of the Charity 
Organization. This fall she was transferred to 
their new office in Queens, which is splendid 
from her point of view but bad from mine. 
When she was at the Seventy-third Street 
office in Manhattan, I used to have lunch 
with her occasionally. It was very soothing 
to my ego to have her assistants treat me with 
deference and bask in Bea's reflected glory. 
-But now these luncheon dates are not practical. 
Bea also moved her domicile this fall — she now 
resides at 5 Minetta Street, New York City. 

Katharine Simonds Thompson lives in 
Ipswich, Massachusetts, and has three chil' 
dren. Nicholas Simonds was born last year 
(K omits the birthday). I believe this is his 
initial bow to the Class. Daniel Pierce is 
almost eight and Judith Hayward "going on 
six." K also finds time to do some book re 
views and tend a vegetable garden. 

Marion Smith Lowndes' permanent address 
is Wiscasset, Maine. She lists her vocation as 
advertising journalism and says, "I employ my 
leisure enjoying home and friends and wishing 
I had worked harder while in College." She 
gave up a splendid position at F. A. O. 
Schwartz as buyer of children's books and de- 
signer of window displays to take a trip to 
Dutch New Guinea. I heard that Frances 
Chrystie fell heir to Smithie's buyer job. She 
returned from Dutch New Guinea early last 
fall and I know you will all be fascinated 
with her account: 

"I have been out in the South Seas for a 
year and a half so I haven't seen anyone from 
1927. But I have seen Charis Denison 
Crockett, 1926. I went out with her and her 
husband, Frederick, on the schooner Chiva 
which they chartered for the Denison-Crockett 
expedition to the South Pacific. Charis is 
living in a Papuan village in the Rain Forest, 
in the northern end of New Guinea, making 
ethnological and anthropological studies of the 
natives. No white woman has ever been there 



before and no research has been done in that 
part of New Guinea. 

"Charis is collecting data for the Peabody 
in Boston. They have been in their village 
half a year, living in a house made of palm 
stalks, among some three hundred Papuans. 
They have a tame dwarf kangaroo who fol' 
lows them around like a dog, and now and 
then they get malaria badly. They expect to 
come back some time this winter." 

Barbara Spackman Marx now lives in Cam' 
bridge, Massachusetts. She has four children — 
Barbara, six; Peter, five; Maria, three and a 
half, and Clare, almost a year. She is Chair- 
man of the Committee on Government and 
Its Operation of the Massachusetts League of 
Women Voters and writes occasional articles 
on government. This is the first time in sev 
eral years that the Class has had any news of 
Barbara. She says: "My husband is German. 
We lived in Hamburg the first two years of 
our marriage. Not being in sympathy with the 
National Socialist Government, we left Ger- 
many, December, 1933. Fritz is now Assistant 
Professor of Government at Harvard. Four 
very lively tow-heads keep me pretty busy." 

Alice Speed Stoll lives in Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, and has a variety of interests and hob- 
bies. She is Finance Chairman of the Young 
Women's Christian Association, a member of 
the Board of the American Red Cross, a mem- 
ber of the Junior League, on the Art Com- 
mittee of the Woman's Club and a member of 
the Colonial Dames. Last spring she finished 
a course in landscape gardening. Alice says 
she "attempts to draw and paint," she raises 
sheep, does flower gardening, and plays tennis 
and golf. In 1936 they took a trip to Hono- 
lulu and in 1937 they went to Mexico and 
the Panama Canal. 

Ursula Squier Reimer lives in New York 
City in the winter and East Hampton in the 
summer. Ursula, junior, the Class baby, is 
now nine and a half, and her brother, J. 
Squier, is six. Ursula is very active in the 
Junior League and is Secretary of two of their 
committees; she edits the 1923 Class Notes 
for the Brearley Bulletin and was elected to 
the Board of the Bryn Mawr Club this fall. 

Helen Stokes Merrill lives in Bedford Hills, 
New York, and has three children — Edith, 
nine; Edwin K., Jr., six, and Penelope, two. 
Helen is interested in the Westchester Chil' 
dren's Association, District Nursing of North' 
ern Westchester and the local School Board. 
She does "spasmodic" carving and gardens. 

Jeanet Sullivan Curtis lives in New Haven 
and her husband is a member of the Yale 
faculty. Jane has three children — Michael, 
eight; Lewis, six, and Nancy, almost two. 
Jane continues her great interest in music, 



[31] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



particularly in playing the piano, and Ursula 
tells me that she often plays chamber music 
with two, three or four other musicians. 

Caroline Swift Farnsworth has not figured 
in this column for years. She now lives in 
Concord, Massachusetts, and has two chil' 
dren — Edith, ten, and Ronald, six. Swiftie is 
very interested in local amateur dramatics, 
amplifying as follows, "I act with and am on 
the Executive Committee of the Concord 
Players." She says her educational interests are 
vicarious since "I alone in my family am not 
in school." She paints pictures, gardens, raises 
children and ducks, chops and saws wood, 
makes her daughter's clothes and watches pro- 
fessional baseball. Her husband teaches at 
Middlesex and Swiftie says that just being 
present is at least a part-time job for her, too. 
"Rural New England," Swiftie thinks, "is like 
an old hat — you get to love it." 

Charlotte Vanderlip Conway lives in her 
new home which they have just finished 
building near her family's home in Scarbor- 
ough. Char writes: "We've just finished 
building a house, South African Dutch, and 
a dream, if I say so myself. The contractor 
folded in the middle of the job, so I had to 
run the rest of it — very educational, but ex- 
pensive." Their son, Vanderlip, is now almost 
four. Char is on the Women's Committee of 
the Kip's Bay Boys' Club, paints furniture, 
farms and gardens and does cooking and can- 
ning. ("We live in an orchard.") Two years 
ago they went to England for the Coronation 
and travelled in Sweden, Norway and 
Denmark. 

Mariquita Villard Platov continues to live 
in New York. Quita was ordained a Dea- 
coness last winter by Archbishop Ignatius of 
the Orthodox Church (Greek). Both Quita 
and her husband are members of an auto- 
cephalus orthodox Synod. At present she is 
assisting her husband in his work of religious 
instruction. Quita is also continuing to study 
Sanskrit. 

Eleanor Waddell Stephens lives in Biltmore 
Forest, right outside of Asheville, North Caro- 
lina. They have three children, George Myers, 
Jr., eight; Hugh Waddell, four, and Eleanor 
Belknap, almost two. But Eleanor has many 
interests besides her children and keeping 
house. About two years ago, she and her 
husband started running a printing plant that 
they bought. Eleanor is the chief bookkeeper. 
She also belongs to a literary club, is the 
Chairman of the Horticultural Committee of 
the Garden Club, is a member of the Board 
of Trustees and the Executive Committee of 
the Asheville County Day School and Chair 
man of the Curriculum Committee. 

Once in a long while she accompanies her 



husband on a camping trip, usually in the 
nearby Smoky Mountains. They spend their 
summers in the mountains, except for two 
weeks or so on Pawley's Island, off the coast 
of South Carolina. Eleanor says that the 
Bryn Mawr Club meets formally once a year 
and now consists of six members. As for her 
daughter, Eleanor says she has had to lay 
aside all thoughts of her being a future May 
Queen because she is a brunette. 

Doris Ames Clivis, according to Eleanor, is 
now doing social service work. 

Elizabeth Winchester Brandt lives in Water- 
ville, Maine, where her husband manages a 
cotton mill. Winnie says she can't join any 
alumnae activities because Waterville never 
heard of Bryn Mawr before she arrived on 
the scene. However, she keeps occupied with 
the Woman's Club, the A. A. U. W., and 
the Junior League. Her hobbies are garden- 
ing, golf and figure skating. She visits her 
family three or four times a year in New 
York. This spring she and her husband are 
planning a trip to Havana. 

And thus endeth the questionnaire, 1927. 
Unless you send me news, this column looks 
forward to bleak jottings for April, May and 
June, as Bea Lillie used to say. 

1928 

Class Editor: Cornelia B. Rose, Jr. 

2333 South Nash Street, Arlington, Va. 

Class Collector: Mary Hopkinson Gibbon 
(Mrs. John H. Gibbon, Jr.) 

The Class wishes to extend its sincere sym- 
pathy to Mary Gaillard, whose father died on 
February 5th after an illness of six months. 
Mary's mother died last winter. We wish to 
express our deep feeling for Mary in this 
double bereavement. 

We have news of a flock of children who have 
joined the families of our classmates recently. 
First is Susan Goodrich Thurlow, daughter of 
Esther Dikeman Thurlow, who arrived on 
October 10, 1938. Esther's two sons, George 
Michael and John Dikeman, are now six and 
two and one-half years old respectively. Also 
some time in October, Eleanor Cohoe Gardner's 
second daughter was born. Her cousin, Ruth 
Gardner Boynton's daughter, arrived just be- 
fore Christmas. In November, Louise Gucker 
Page's son, Robert Alan Page, Jr., was 
deposited by the stork. His sister Patricia, now 
two years old, plays with the Cherry girls, who 
live quite near. Cay herself reports that "our 
only addition is a second-hand sailboat." But 
she seems to be leading a busy life with fam- 
ily, friends, concerts, social work, badminton 
and skiing (New Year's at Lake Placid) to 
keep her occupied. 



[32] 









BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Word has just reached us that Lenore Hoi' 
lander Koehler's daughter, whose birth in 
April has been reported, is named Gerda 
Winifred. The Koehlers are still in Germany. 

We seem to be scattering to foreign parts. 
Betty Stewart was married in November to 
Mr. Arnold E. Waters and has gone to live 
in Johannesburg, South Africa — address un- 
known in greater detail. In January, Emma 
Gillinder was married to William John Gods- 
man, of Maud, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, and 
Assam, India, and departed forthwith for the 
latter country. Her husband is a graduate of 
the University of Aberdeen. 

Ruth Peters is professor of mathematics and 
physics at Lake Erie College in Painesville, 
Ohio. Peggy Perry Bruton has bought a house 
in Wayne, Pennsylvania. Diza Steck spent 
the summer in England. Edith Morgan Whit- 
aker, whom we saw for ten minutes on her 
way to Woods Hole this summer, is back in 
Palo Alto for the winter, but spent the holi- 
days in Pasadena. These are the tantalizing 
little tid-bits that come our way. Don't blame 
us if 1928's Notes are blank so much of the 
time, but bestir yourselves and put pen to 
paper. Everyone seems to think they have 
nothing newsworthy to report unless there has 
been a marriage or a baby. Other things are 
interesting, too! 

1929 

Class Editor: Juliet Garrett Munroe 
(Mrs. Henry Munroe) 
22 Willett St., Albany, N. Y. 

Class Collector: Nancy Woodward Budlong 
(Mrs. A. L. Budlong) 

1930 
Class Editor: Edith Grant Griffiths 
(Mrs. David Wood Griffiths) 
2010 Wolfe St., Little Rock, Arkansas 
Class Collector: Eleanor Smith Gaud 
(Mrs. Wm. Steen Gaud) 

Dorothea Cross Leighton and her husband 
are reported to have motored to Hollywood 
last summer, on business for Johns Hopkins, 
investigating the use of sound in psychiatric 
work. 

Agnes Hannay and Mary Peters Fieser were 
seen on the campus at the Alumnae Week-end 
last autumn. Agnes is still teaching at a girls' 
school outside of Rhinebeck, New York. Mary 
was there with her husband, who was one of 
the honour guests at the ceremonies initiating 
the new Science Building. 

Aggie Howell Mallory has moved to 
Memphis, her husband's home. 

Elizabeth Fehrer is teaching psychology at 
Wellesley and loves it. She even likes prepar' 
ing and delivering lectures. 



Thomasia Hancock Spencer has a daughter 
over a year old, we learn, named Belle Clay, 
after Tommy's sister. Another daughter is 
Helen Taylor Dexter's, Katharine, born in 
September. The Dexters are practically settled 
in Cincinnati, where he teaches at the medical 
school. Taylor, herself, was planning to return 
to the Jersey City Medical Center in January 
to finish up her interrupted interneship. 

Silvine Slingluff Savage has a son, Peter 
Vandervoort, born December 18, 1938. 

Marjorie Park Swope has a third son, born 
last June, a few days after her father's death. 

The Class extends sincerest sympathy to 
Marjorie for this loss and also to Sally Turner, 
whose mother died last spring. 

1931 

Class Editor: Mary Oakford Slingluff 
(Mrs. Jesse Slingluff, Jr.) 
305 Northway, Guilford, Baltimore, Md. 

Class Collector: Lois Thurston 

On Sunday, January 8th, Elizabeth Howson 
McKenrick had a daughter who has been 
named Elizabeth McKenrick. I can personally 
testify that even at the age of three days, 
when I first saw her, she was a very handsome 
girl. On April 1st the McKenrick family will 
move into a new house at 202 Longwood 
Road, Roland Park, Baltimore. In spite of 
the excitement of the baby's birth and the 
purchase of the house occurring in the same 
week, Libby is convalescing satisfactorily. 

Here is a splendid letter from Emily Lewis 
Norcross, who is now living at Carlisle, Illinois. 
She says: "First of all, Anne Lord Andrews 
has a daughter, born a year ago Christmas 
Eve. We Norcrosses have one, born a year 
ago Thanksgiving Day. Annzy, Toutes Dyer 
and I all went to Chicago last June for Helen 
Bell's wedding. She was married to Geoffrey 
de Freitas, of London. My husband and I 
took a flying trip to Europe last August and 
saw the de Freitas' there. Unfortunately we 
were only in London two days and didn't 
have a chance to look up Kitty Cone Mount, 
another British wife. Helen was in the throes 
of moving into their own flat, buying modern 
Swedish furniture, and writing thank you 
notes. 

"We were welcomed at the pier on arriving 
home by Annzy, who was just starting a part- 
time job connected with the Brearley School. 
Toutes is also living in New York with a 
most interesting job at the Henry Street Set- 
tlement, combining social service with dra- 
matics. She was in Saint Louis at Christmas 
and came to our house in Carlisle, Illinois, in 
the heart of the oil boom territory, for dinner. 
She was wearing Virginia Hobart's bridesmaid 



[33] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



dress. Ginny and Benjamin Ayer Fairbank 
were married on December 12th in Chicago 
and are now living in Cambridge, Massachu- 
setts. I had hoped to go to the wedding, but 
we had just gotten ourselves into this house 
and were frantically getting settled. We left 
Tulsa, Oklahoma, on October 1st after two 
years there, and it took us until December to 
unearth an unoccupied and usable house in 
this vicinity. All the towns are jammed full 
of us 'oil people/" 

Dr. Louise Snyder Childs is living in 
Hawaii. Her address is in care of Dr. Edward 
Speer Childs, Mahelona Hospital, Lihue, 
Kanai, Hawaii. 

1932 

Class Editor: Margaret Woods Keith 

(Mrs. E. Gordon Keith) 

Hillside, 254th St. and Independence Ave. 

New York City 
Class Collector: Ellen Shaw Kesler 

(Mrs. Robert Wilson Kesler) 

A note from Eleanor Stonington (Mrs. 
Robert Stevens) reports that she and her hus- 
band and her brother, John Stonington, have 
moved to Boston. They are living in an apart' 
ment (39 East Springfield Street) near Boston 
City Hospital, where Steve is interning. Stony 
spends her days working with the Community 
Health Association. 

Wallace and Eleanor (Renner) de Laguna 
announce the birth of their daughter Dian on 
January 20th. The de Lagunas are now living 
somewhere on Long Island — we believe in Port 
Washington. Wallace is teaching geology at 
Long Island University. 

Yvonne Cameron has moved westward, and 
is teaching at the Columbus School for Girls 
in Columbus, Ohio. She is in full charge of 
the teaching of French at the school and 
loves it. 

We have quite a bit of news pertaining to 
twins this month. Margaret Foote Moore and 
John Denis Moore were born in New York 
on October 18, 1938. We are considerably 
interested to note that their grandmother 
(Martha Jenkins Foote, Bryn Mawr, 1902) 
had a twin brother, and so also did their 
mother, Mary Foote Moore, 1932. Mary tells 
me that Margaret's hair is of a nondescript 
shade, but that John's, from the little that has 
appeared so far, promises to be red, like his 
father's. The twins were very small at birth, 
but have already grown to a good healthy 
size. Since their arrival the Moore family has 
moved to a new residence at 115 East Eighty 
ninth Street, in New York City. 

The next twin item concerns Margaret 
Williams, who has recently married one. Her 
letter speaks for itself: 



"I have meant to let you know of my mar- 
riage sooner— but everything connected with it 
was so upset that I feel I have only just come 
out of the woods. I was married on October 
8th to Billings Burch Fairbrother, who is 
assistant superintendent of the Atwood Ma* 
chine Company here (Stonington, Connecti- 
cut). The invitations were mailed the morning 
of the hurricane. We retrieved those we could 
from the postoffice, but many that got out 
were lost, I think. We recalled all the invita- 
tions, as this village was so badly damaged 
that neither of us felt we could go through 
with even the simplest of festivities. It was 
almost a week before we could get our minds 
on to plans again — beyond the fact that there 
was to be no reception. I did not even wear 
a real wedding dress, as I had planned, but 
only my going away suit. On the morning 
of the 7th the power company had not been 
able as yet to get light and power in the 
church, and this was not completed until noon 
of the 8th; the ceremony was at four. We 
did not have any honeymoon, as Bill had to 
be back at work by Monday noon. 

"On the 21st of January we, his twin 
brother and his wife, are going on a cruise 
through the West Indies. It is what we call 
a belated honeymoon. 

"This village was one of the worst hit. We 
not only got the wind, but a terrific tide. 
Misquamicut, Rhode Island, is only ten miles 
off as the crow flies and got much more into 
the papers because of the great loss of life. 
We were entirely cut off from the world for 
two days, and for one day we thought there 
might be a food shortage. Besides the resi 
dents here we had to feed the passengers of 
the wrecked New Haven train. The track 
between here and Westerly, Rhode Island, is 
still in bad shape; a trestle was washed out 
and when they finished repairing it, it sank 
six feet over night. It still tips, goes down 
and has a frightful bend in it. The trains 
snail across that section. The bend ... is 
three feet out of line. 

"It is almost impossible to describe the hur- 
ricane. I was home all the time, and did not 
realize how fearful the water damage was, 
beyond the fact that houses back of ours were 
endangered. We had seventeen extras at our 
house that night, and somehow three pounds 
of hamburger fed fifteen grown-ups. The chil- 
dren got soup. My chief impression was the 
noise of the wind, which did not allow you 
to hear the trees falling, a semi-darkness and 
an attempt to get oil lamps to work. My 
brother-in-law was at 'the shop' and saw the 
waves roll four-ton granite rocks about like 
pebbles and move houses like match boxes. 
My sister was at our aunt's, and had to help 



[34] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 






board up windows— we didn't lose any — and 
my fiance drove down from Providence, just 
missing the worst there. It took five and a 
half hours to go fifty miles. The bad part of 
it here was that the fishermen lost not only 
their homes but their boats, and many families 
are almost destitute now.'" Margaret gives her 
address as "The Instead," in Stonington, 
Connecticut. 

1933 

Class Editor: Margaret Tyler Archer 
(Mrs. John S. B. Archer) 
St. Paul's School, Concord, N. H. 

Class Collector: Mabel Meehan Schlimme 
(Mrs. B. F. Schlimme, Jr.) 

1934 

Class Editor: Carmen Duany 

Hotel Ansonia, 74th and Broadway 
New York, N. Y. 

Class Collector: Katherine L. Fox 

Three more babies belong on the list for the 
year 1938. All were born in December. First, 
on December 15th, comes Anna Martin 
Findley McLanahan's son, Michael Ward 
McLanahan, who was born in Minneapolis, 
where Charles works for the co-operatives and 
where Mart moved last August when she com' 
pleted her training in social work at the Uni' 
versity of Chicago. Next comes Mary Car' 
penter Greve's daughter, Carolyn Carpenter 
Greve, born December 20th. Finally, to finish 
the year, on December 31st comes Nancy 
Stevenson Langmuir's son, Stevenson Lang- 
muir, eight pounds, six ounces, and, we are 
assured, with a plentiful supply of luxuriant 
locks. 

New Year's found Harriet Mitchell, on 
leave from the Baltimore City Hospital, back 
in Duluth, and Halla Brown, fourth'year med' 
ical student at Johns Hopkins, down in New 
Orleans a'sunning herself. It found Beatrix 
Busch Miller and her husband skiing in Cali' 
fornia and Anita Fouilhoux and Marian Hope 
skiing at Woodstock. Marian, who has also 
been trying out the slopes of the Poconos, 
will soon leave for Sun Valley in search of 
still greater thrills and spills than are offered 
by the eastern terrain. Fouilhoux, now work' 
ing hard at Rockefeller Center for New York 
Interpreted, the only tourist guide in New 
York, will leave in the middle of February on 
a month's tour of South America as librarian 
of the Kungsholm, the ship whose captain 
grows orchids in his cabin. She will go up the 
Amazon River, will stop at Rio de Janeiro and 
will touch on several of the Lesser Antilles. 

If any of you are going by the old home 



town of Santiago de Cuba (Cuba) between 
February and June be sure to look up your 
Editor. Louise Landrcth's twin brother, Eddie, 
did last year, in the course of a business trip 
through the island, and thereby proved it was 
not an impossible feat. 

The New York benefit performance of The 
Importance of Being Earnest for the Bryn 
Mawr Summer School is a bigger undertaking 
this year than it has been for many a past 
year. Grace Meehan is the hard-working 
Chairman; Sarah Miles Kindleberger is on the 
committee, being clerical, and Maria Coxe is 
doing the publicity end, writing for the papers. 

193? 

Class Editors: Elizabeth Colie 

377 Vose Ave., South Orange, N. J. 

and 
Elizabeth Kent Tarshis 
(Mrs. Lorie Tarshis) 
65 Langdon St., Cambridge, Mass. 

Class Collector: Josephine E. Baker 

The Class wishes to extend its deepest sym- 
pathy to Nancy Bucher, whose father died 
very suddenly at Baltimore on January 11th. 

At a tea to announce Betsey Bates' engage- 
ment to Alan Carrick (but that now belongs 
to 1936) we learned that Diana Morgan 
Jackson is back again in Germany. This time 
she is reading newspapers for some organiza- 
tion unknown to our informant. 

Sally Hupfel writes from Washington: "I 
have been visiting with Margaret Sanger at 
her winter home in Tucson, Arizona. I've 
gone in for birth control in a very serious 
way — terribly interesting and I hope I shall 
be able to help put it where it belongs — in 
Public Health. I had tea with Ginny Cooke 
yesterday. She is busying herself with piano 
and the Travellers' Aid — apparently her stint 
for the Junior League." Sally's address to 
June 1st is care of Mrs. J. B. Shaw Parker, 
3304 O Street, Washington, D. C. 

Ruth Davy and Betty Little have an apart- 
ment together in New York at 20 East Thirty- 
fifth Street. Ruth is working in the publicity 
department of the Hotel Biltmore and Betty 
is continuing her graduate studies at Columbia. 

Nancy Nicoll Pearson has a job at Jane 
Engel's, a New York dress shop. 

It will undoubtedly be interesting to the 
Class to know that Kenty's (Elizabeth Kent 
Tarshis) husband is one of the authors of 
An Economic Program for American Democ 
racy, which was on the bestseller list in Wash- 
ington at the end of January. The main idea 
is that a permanent spending program has to 
be undertaken to keep democracy going. 



[35] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



1936 

Class Editor: Barbara L. Cary 
Merion Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Assistant Editor: Elizabeth M. Bates 
9 Fernwood Road, Summit, N. J. 

Class Collector: Ellen Scattergood Zook 
(Mrs. W. H. Dunwoody Zook) 

1937 

Class Editor: Alice G. King 

61 East 86th St., New York City 

Class Collector: Sarah Ann Fultz 

On December 1, 1938, Mary Livingston 
was married to John Martin Woodside, an 
architect in the Treasury. They are living at 
2900 Que Street, Georgetown. Mary is con' 
tinuing her work as secretary to William 
Flather, Jr. 

Lou Bright (Mrs. William H. Peace, 2nd) 
writes that her chief occupation is playing 
nurse to William H. Peace, 3rd, who was born 
on August 14, 1938. They have moved to 
Cedar Hill Road, Springhouse, Pennsylvania. 

On New Year's Eve, Julie Baldwin (Mrs. 
C. Harold Taylor), reached for the telephone 
at the Doctor's Hospital, and announced the 
arrival of her son, C. Harold Taylor, Jr., that 
afternoon. 

The other day we ran into Molly Meyer 
and she said she was working for the Na' 
tional Industrial Conference Board. We walked 
home muttering the name under our breath 
like a telephone number for fear of forget' 
ting it. 

Cordy Stone reports that she is handling 
every imaginable type of furniture adjustment 
for Frederick Loeser's Store. 

Louise Stengel is in Washington working 
at the Employment Center, after a year of 
loafing, which she found pretty boring. 

Winnie SafFord is working as secretary for 
the Houston Symphony, which means she 
does everything from soup to nuts. She sells 
tickets at the box office, helps the wives of 
refugee musicians get out of Germany, 
wrangles with the American Federation of 
Labor stage unions, and tries to placate dow 
agers who can't sit in the most conspicuous 
boxes. Needless to say, she is enjoying life 
immensely. 

Sonny Thomson has been more or less in 
New York recently. She is working with the 
Oxford Group on the question of moral re 
armament, using Bunny Austin's new book as 
a primer. 

Lucky Fawcett has been doing charity work 
in a settlement house, and by the time this is 



off the press she will be in the midst of a 
cruise around South America. 

Queenie Huebner writes briefly that she is 
working for Donald Watt, Director of the 
Experiment in International Living, Putney, 
Vermont. 

Janet Diehl is dividing her time between 
figure skating and research work at the Balti' 
more Museum of Art. 

Peggy Houck is in New York and during 
the Christmas season she worked in Altman's 
and loved it. Now she is taking scenario 
writing at Columbia. Please, she says, won't 
you look her up on your way through New 
York? 235 East Seventysecond Street. 

Emma Scott and Marjorie Lord are both 
teaching. Scotty is at the Rydal School, the 
Junior Department of Ogontz; and Marjorie 
is in the Clark's Summit- Clark's Green Joint 
High School. M. Lee Powell is an assistant 
Kindergarten teacher at the Rivers School in 
Brookline and is living at home. 

Virginia Jussen writes the following inter- 
esting news: "At present, I have a small of- 
fice job at the Community Chest headquarters. 
The job consists mainly of compiling mor- 
tality statistics for the city of Cincinnati for 
years 1931-1936. In my spare time I do some 
concentrated dabbling in various Fine Arts. 
Recently I revived the quaint art of making 
Tinsel Paintings. I won't go into what they 
are, as you probably know; but if you don't, 
the nearest antique dealer can probably tell 
you, as the pictures used to be made in the 
New England States along about 1800. Some 
of my pictures are being sold (I am happy 
to say) by Closson's, one of the better art 
stores in Cincinnati." 

Selma Ingber got her M.A. at Bryn Mawr 
last year and is now combining work at the 
Peirce Business College with a search for an 
opening in Psychology. 

Henchy Varbalow is studying for her M.A. 
at the University of Pennsylvania. 

Mary Harwood is studying singing at the 
Juillard School in New York and belongs to 
the Live Alone and Like It sect. 

Jane Watson is also studying music and is 
about to leave on a cruise to South America 
with her father. 

Sophie Hemphill is continuing at the School 
of Industrial Art in Philadelphia. 

Jane Blaffer and Mary Peters both report 
they are merely leading normal lives at home, 
the latter is Provisional Junior Leaguing. 

Chuckie Peirce says she is still holding her 
own, and with great enthusiasm, at Johns 
Hopkins. 

Tommy Allinson reports the unique pre- 
dicament of wavering between fox'hunting 
and job'hunting. 



[36] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



1938 

Class Editor: Alison Raymond 

114 E. 40th St., New York, N. Y. 

Class Collector: Dewilda E. Naramore 

Blanca Noel announced her engagement 
recently to Robert Taft, Jr., son of the Sena' 
tor, and nephew and cousin respectively to 
Dean Manning and Nonie Taft. He is at 
present a senior at Yale. Blanca has been 
studying cooking for some months. 

Dodie Devigne was married on January 14th 
to William Nelson Donovan. Julia Grant was 
her only attendant. The wedding was small. 
Helen Shepard came down from Boston for it, 
and seemed to be enjoying her life of leisure. 
She gave us news of some of the Boston people. 

Sue Williams is an apprentice teacher at 
Shady Hill, where she is teaching Latin. 

Dewilda Naramore is studying at Radcliffe, 
and has been very active in trying to arrange 
a Co'operative Radcliffe and Harvard cafeteria 
for graduate students which is uphill work. 



Barbara Longcope is to be numbered among 
those studying shorthand and typing. She is 
in Baltimore for the winter. 

Anne Goodman is working in New York, 
at a booking agency. She likes writing press 
notices, but says the job is dull otherwise. 

Debby Hubbard is in Florida for the win' 
ter, playing golf and no doubt basking in sun, 
instead of slushing through February rains. 
The New York Bryn Mawr Club had a supper 
recently, at which Dr. Fenwick spoke. Eighty 
people were there, but of that number only 
three were from 1938 — Marj Hartman, Mary 
Walker and Charlotte Westcott. At the next 
meeting Mr. Willoughby is speaking about 
Gilbert and Sullivan. He is showing the col' 
lege movies, and taking up the victrola records 
to illustrate his talk. 

Did anyone who noticed the James Thurber 
joke about Bryn Mawr in a recent 7\£etu 
Tor\er, remember that Jane Farrar had lunch 
with him not long ago? We draw no con' 
elusions, but noted the coincidence! 



T)eady for Delivery 



A series of twelve Staffordshire dinner plates by Wedgwood . 

prpn iHator opiate* 

Bryn Mawr Alumnae Association, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Please send me .sets of Bryn Mawr plates at $15 per set. 

Color choice £] Blue £] Rose Q Green Q] Mulberry 



Signed. 



Address. 



Make checks payable and address all inquiries to Alumnae Association of Bryn Mawr College 
The Deanery, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

A PROMPT ORDER WILL HELP 
THE ALUMNAE FUND 



[37] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



& 



I1ECTOIY 



The Agnes Irwin School 

WYNNEWOOD, PENNA. 

Grades V to XII 

A College Preparatory 

School for Girls 

Kyneton School 

VILLA NOVA, PENNA. 

Pre-school and Grades I to IV 

BERTHA M. LAWS, A.B., Headmistress 



The Madeira School 

Greenway, Fairfax County, Virginia 
A resident and country day school 
for girls on the Potomac River 
near Washington, D. C. 
150 acres 10 fireproof buildings 

LUCY MADEIRA WING, Headmistress 



Wykeham Rise 

WASHINGTON, CONNECTICUT 
IN THE LITCHFIELD HILLS 

College Preparatory and General Courses 

Special Courses in Art and Music 

Riding, Basketball, and Outdoor Sports 

FANNY E. DAVIES, Headmistress 



BRYN MAWR COLLEGE INN 
TEA ROOM 

Luncheons 40c - 50c - 75c 
Dinners 85c - $1.25 

Meals a la carte and table d'hote 
Daily and Sunday 8:30 A.M. to 7:30 P.M. 

AFTERNOON TEAS 
THE PUBLIC IS INVITED 

MISS SARA DAVIS, Mgr. 
Tel: Bryn Mawr 386 



THE 
SHIPLEY SCHOOL 

BRYN MAWR, PENNSYLVANIA 
Preparatory to 

Bryn Mawr College 



ALICE G. HOWLAND 1 . . 

ELEANOR 0. BROWNELL J Pnnci P als 



The Ethel Walker School 

SIMSBURY, CONNECTICUT 

Head of School 

ETHEL WALKER SMITH, A.M. 

Bryn Mawr College 

Head Mistress 

CHARLOTTE WELLES SPEER, A.B. 
Vassar College 



Rosemary Hall 

Greenwich, Conn. 
COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

Constance Evers } 

Eugenia Baker Jessup, B.A. ; Headmistresses 

Bryn Mawr College ) 

Caroline Ruutz-Rees, Ph.D. 
Mary E. Lowndes, M.A., Litt.D. 



Advisers 



Approved Penna. Private Business School 

BUSINESS TRAINING 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
AND SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 




for young men and women. 

One, Two and Three Years 
Day and Evening Courses 
8 Weeks Summer Session 



Founded 1865 



PEIRCE SCHOOL 



Pine St. West of Broad 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



Kindly mention Bsyn Mawb Alumnae Bulletin 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



& 



s 



DIRECT 



Y 



FERRY HALL 

Junior College: Two years of college work. 
Special courses in Music, Art and Dramatics. 

Preparatory Department: Prepares for 
colleges requiring entrance examinations, 
also, for certificating colleges and universities. 

General and Special Courses. 

Campus on Lake Front — Outdoor Sports — 
Indoor Swimming Pool — Riding 

For catalog address 

ELOISE R. TREMAIN 

LAKE FOREST ILLINOIS 



The Baldwin School 

BRYN MAWR, PENNSYLVANIA 
A Resident and Country Day School for Girls 

Ten Miles from Philadelphia 
Stone buildings, indoor swimming pool, sports. 
Thorough and modern preparation for all lead- 
ing colleges. Graduates now in over 40 colleges 
and vocational schools. 

ELIZABETH FORREST JOHNSON 
HEAD OF THE SCHOOL 



The Katharine Branson School 

ROSS, CALIFORNIA 
Across the Bay from San Francisco 

A Country School College Preparatory 

Head: 
Katharine Fleming Branson, A.B., Bryn Mawr 



A Book of 
Bryn Mawr Pictures 

32 Gravure Reproductions of Photographs by 

IDA W. PRITCHETT, 1914 

"The pictures are extraordinarily fresh and inter' 
esting, the text a golden mean between explanation 
and sentiment, and the form of the book is 
distinguished." President Park. 

Now on Sale at the Alumnae Office for $1.00 

( 10 cents extra for postage) 



TOW-HEYWOOn 

| J On the Sound ^AtShippsn Point | / 

ESTABLISHED 186.". 

Preparatory to the Leading Colleges for Women. 
Also General Course. 

Art and Music. 

Separate Junior School. 

Outdoor Sports. 

One hour from New York 

Address 

MARY ROGERS ROPER, Headmistress 

Box Y, Stamford. Conn. 



MISS BEARD'S 
SCHOOL 

Excellent Preparation for the 
Leading Colleges for Women 

General Courses with 

Eleetives in Household Arts, 

Music, and Art 

Metropolitan opportunities in drama, 

art, and music. Country life and 

outdoor sports; hockey, basketball, 

tennis, archery, riding. 



Lucie C. Beard, Headmistress 
Box 84, Orange, New Jersey 



La Loma Feliz 

SANTA BARBARA, CALIFORNIA 

Residential School, Kindergarten through College 
Preparatory, for boys and girls who need especial 
attention or change of environment because of 
physical handicaps. No tuberculous or mentally 
retarded children can be received. 

INA M. RICHTER 

Medical Director and Head Mistress 

B.A. Bryn Mawr, M.D. Johns Hopkins 



ABBOT ACADEMY 

ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

Over a century of achievement as its heritage. 
Rich traditions combined with modern methods. 
Thorough college preparatory course; also gen- 
eral course with emphasis on the fine arts. 
Excellent equipment. Beautiful country campus 
twenty-three miles from Boston. All sports. 
MARGUERITE M. HEARSEY, Principal 



THE 



MARY <♦ WHEELER 
SCHOOL 

Excellent College Preparatory Record and General 
Cultural Course. Leisure for Hobbies. Modern in 
Spirit. Methods and Equipment. Daily Sports on 
170 acre Farm. Country Residence for Younger Girls. 
MARY HELENA DEY, M.A., Principal, Providence, R. I. 




Kindly mention Bkyn Maws Alumnae Bulletin 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



College Publications — 



Colleges and schools are exacting in the accuracy 
and quality of their printing — and rightly so! The 
printer serving this field must measure up to an 
exceptionally high standard. The John C. Winston 
Company for more than thirty years has served 
the colleges and schools in this section of the 
country so well that many of the first accounts are 
still prominent in the rapidly increasing list. 

This same accuracy and quality extends to the 
printing of catalogs, booklets, folders, private 
editions, etc., handled through the Commercial 
Printing Department. Then, too, the versatility of 
our equipment many times offers a surprising price 
advantage. 

The John C. Winston Co. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



Jform of pequesit for €nbotoment 



I give and bequeath to The Trustees of Bryn Mawr 
College, a corporation established by law in the State of 

Pennsylvania, the sum of 

to be invested and preserved inviolably for the endowment of 
Bryn Mawr College, located at Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. 



Date 



g CAMP DIRECTORY g 

All camps listed in this directory are owned, directed or pat- 
ronized by Bryn Mawr Alumnae. Please give them first con- 
sideration when selecting a camp for yourself or your children. 




BACK LOG CAMP 

SABAEL P. O.. NEW YORK 

On Indian Lake in the Adirondack Mountains 
A Camp for Families and Adults 




1896 



1939 



PLAN NOW FOR NEXT SUMMER 

• It is remarkable how staunchly Back Log Camp has withstood the ravages of 
progress. The wildness of the Adirondack wilderness is being steadily destroyed by 
new roads, but as yet there is no road into the Camp. The serious annoyance 
caused by this inconvenient arrangement is offset by the complete privacy of the 
Back Log tract and the sense this gives of being in a different world from that left 
at home. So far electricity has not invaded the Camp. Nor do noisy and speedy 
motor boats deafen you as they rush madly along. Canoes, rowboats, and feet are 
still the means of getting from one place to another. And these places are wild spots 
in little freguented parts of the woods. 



For full information write to 



MRS. W. D. LAMBERT 



727 PARK AVE., TAKOMA PARK, D. C. 




ALICE NICOLL, A.B. Bryn Mawr College, 1922, 

Address: 118 East 93rd Street, New York, New York 



HIGHFIELDS 

CAMP 

A Camp for Girls, 

9-17, 

on Alford Lake. 

East Union, Maine 

• 

Healthful location 

near Maine Coast. 

Junior, 

Intermediate, 

Senior groups. 

Cabins. 

Water sports, hockey, 

tap dancing, tennis, 

trips. 

Studio. 

• 
CATALOGUE 

Director 



Kindly mention Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 





THE BLEND THAT CAN T BE COPIED 

THE RIGHT COMBINATION OF THE WORLD'S BEST CIGARETTE TOBACCOS 



Copyright 1939, Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 



BRYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 
BULLETIN 




THE COUNCIL MEETS IN DISTRICT I. 






April, 1939 



Vol. XIX 



No. 4 



Entered as second-class matter, January 15, 1921, at the Post Office, Phila., Pa., under Act of March 3, 1S7Q 

COPYRIGHT. 1939 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



OFFICERS OF THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President Ida Lauer Darrow, 1921 

Vice-President Yvonne Stoddard Hayes, 1913 

Secretary Dorothea Chambers Blaisdell, 1919 

Treasurer Margaret E. Brusstar, 1903 

Chairman of the Finance Committee Edith Harris West, 1926 

Directors at Lars-e I Gertrude Hearne Myers, 1919 

directors at Large j Ellenor Morris, 1927 

ALUMNAE SECRETARY, Mildred Buchanan Bassett, 1924 

EDITOR AND BUSINESS MANAGER OF THE BULLETIN 

Marjorie L. Thompson, 1912 

DISTRICT COUNCILLORS 

District I Elizabeth Lawrence Mendell, 1925 

District II Ruth Cheney Streeter, 1918 

District III Mildred Kimball Ruddock, 1936 

District IV Ruth Biddle Penfield, 1929 

District V Eloise G. ReQua, 1924 

District VI Delia Smith Mares, 1926 

District VII Katharine Collins Hayes, 1929 

ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 
Eleanor Little Aldrich, 1905 Adelaide W. Neall, 1906 

Mary Alden Morgan Lee, 1912 Ethel C. Dunham, 1914 

Eleanor Marquand Forsyth, 1919 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ALUMNAE FUND 
Edith Harris West, 1926 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 
Louise B. Dillingham, 1916 

CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUND COMMITTEE 
Caroline Lynch Byers, 1920 

CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
Dr. M. Elizabeth Howe, 1924 

CHAIRMAN OF THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE 
Serena Hand Savage, 1922 



TABLE OF CONTENTS: 



The Council Meets in District I page 1 

Building for Security in an Insecure World page 10 

Excerpts from President Park's Speech at the Council. 

Miss Helburn and Miss Hepburn Entertain, 

by Hortense Flexner King, 1907 page 15 

Ballot for Alumnae Director and 

Councillors for District II. and District V page 16 

Impressions of the Alumnae Council, by Barbara Cary, 1936 page 18 

Report of the Alumnae Directors to the Council page 19 

Deanery Notes page 21 

Highlights of the Directors 1 March Meeting, 

b;y the Senior Alumnae Director, Eleanor Little Aldrich, 1905 page 22 

Gift to the Library page 23 

Undergraduate Notes, by Ellen Matteson, 1940 page 24 

College Calendar page 25 

News from the Districts page 26 

Graduate Day page 27 

Class Notes page 28 

Camp Directory page 43 



Bryn Mawr Alumnae 

Bulletin 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 

THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNA ASSOCIATION 

Marjorie L. Thompson, '12, Editor and Business Manager 

EDITORIAL BOARD 
Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, *05 Denise Gallaudet Francis, '32 

Emily Kimbrough Wrench, '21 Louise Congdon Francis, '00 

Pamela Burr, '28 Barbara L. Cary, '36 

Ida Lauer Darrow, '21, ex-oficio 

Subscription Price, $1.50 a Tear Single Copies, 25 Cents 

Checks should be drawn to the order of Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 

Published monthly, except August, September and October, at 1006 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

All material should be sent to the Alumnae Office the first of each month. 



Vol. XIX 



APRIL, 1939 



No. 4 



THE COUNCIL MEETS IN DISTRICT I. 



EACH Council has to an amazing 
degree a curious personality of its 
own. Last year the feeling was ex- 
pressed in a dozen different ways, that the 
more informed alumnae become on the 
subject of the College, the more their in- 
terest, loyalty, and co-operation can be 
counted on and that a vigorous Associa- 
tion was the best means to that end. This 
year the efforts of the Association to 
strengthen every link show marked re- 
suits. The Council took for granted 
that the Association must be strong and 
efficient, with as wide a membership base 
as possible, and focused its attention on 
the College, on its plans, needs, and ac- 
complishments, and on the part it was 
playing and hoped to play in a troubled 
world by means of the training and op- 
portunities that it was offering its stop 
dents. This sharply focused interest made 
all the meetings lively and interesting. 
The only members of the Council not 
there for at least some of the sessions 



were the Vice-President of the Associa- 
tion, Yvonne Stoddard Hayes, 1913; two 
of the Alumnae Directors, Mary Alden 
Morgan Lee, 1912, and Ethel C. Dun- 
ham, 1914; M. Elizabeth Howe, 1924, 
Chairman of the Committee on Health 
and Physical Education; Katharine Col- 
lins Hayes, 1929, Councillor for District 
VII. , who was represented by Hilda 
Wright Broad, 1929; and Millicent Carey 
Mcintosh, 1920, Trustee of the College 
and one of the especially invited guests 
who always contribute so much to the 
interest of the Council. 

DISCUSSION OF FINANCIAL 
AFFAIRS 

The opening session, held in the pleas- 
ant room of the Faculty Club in New 
Haven, was entirely given over to a dis- 
cussion of financial affairs with the 
Chairman of the Deanery Committee 
especially invited to be present. The 
Treasurer of the Association, the Chair- 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



man of the Finance Committee, and 
Caroline McCormick Slade, 1896, Chair- 
man of the Deanery Committee, all pre- 
sented their reports before any discussion 
took place. A Deanery report was sched- 
uled with the other two because the Dean- 
ery itself and its financial needs are be- 
coming so definitely a part of the Asso- 
ciation picture. 

Margaret Brusstar, 1903, the Treas- 
urer, reported that although "a quickened 
interest in the Association is spreading 
among a constantly widening group of 
people, . . . seven years of depression 
are at last producing an effect even on 
such a granite-like structure as the in- 
come of the Association. ... In fact 
there has been a slight decrease in income 
from almost every one of our sources.' ' 
Expenses, however, have fallen slightly. 
"Salaries, executive and committee ex- 
penses and the questionnaire (this year 
printed in a simplified form on post-cards) 
account to some extent for the reductions, 1 1 
but the decrease in expense is not propor- 
tionate to the decrease in income. There- 
fore to raise the money which we stand 
pledged to pay to the College, and on 
which the College counts absolutely, a 
very special effort will have to be made 
on the part of every alumna. 

Following this, Caroline McCormick 
Slade discussed the Deanery situation. 
The Deanery has proved itself not only 
essential to the alumnae but to the life of 
the College. Miss Thomas' estate is 
almost settled and it is hoped that the 
College can take over the administration 
of it this spring, but because much of the 
estate is in real estate and there are ex' 
penses which have to be met, there will 
be no income available for some time, 
although the Deanery is the first charge 
on the fund. The College is remitting 
the bills for heat and light and may take 
over the care of the garden, but to sup- 



plement the income which the Deanery 
makes for itself $2000 from the alumnae 
is necessary for next year. 

In reporting for the Finance Commit- 
tee and the Alumnae Fund, Edith Harris 
West, 1926, stressed the importance of 
the Alumnae Fund in co-ordinating all 
money-raising among the alumnae. In 
passing, she paid a warm tribute to the 
Class Collectors and touched again on 
the points raised at the Collectors' meet- 
ing at the time of the Alumnae Week' 
end: both the method of collecting and 
the objectives of Reunion gifts. In clos- 
ing she recommended for the considera- 
tion of the Council the following gifts to 
the College to be included in the Budget 
for 1939-1940: 

For academic purposes $6000 

For the Deanery 2000 

For Rhoads Scholarships 500 



$8500 

Following these reports there was 
lively and wide-ranging discussion pro- 
voked by them directly or indirectly: the 
finances of the Deanery, functions of the 
Alumnae Fund, and the recurrent prob- 
lem of class memorials in relation to the 
Alumnae Fund. 

The Council accepted the report of the 
Treasurer and of the Chairman of the 
Finance Committee realizing that in so 
doing they were definitely including the 
$2000 for the Deanery in the proposed 
budget for 1939-1940. 

The Treasurer of the Association then 
brought up the problem that the Social 
Security Act, if applied to colleges, would 
create in connection with the faculty 
pension plan now in force at Bryn Mawr, 
by which up to 5 % of salary is set aside 
each month and matched by the College 
from its own funds. Other colleges are 
facing this same problem of added finan- 



m 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



cial burden at a time when all one can 
hope for is merely to balance the 
budget. She added the good news that 
the Government has sent a notice that 
contributions to the Alumnae Fund are 
tax exempt. As a logical sequence of this 
problem of diminishing income the ques- 
tion of increasing College resources by- 
means of bequests was brought up. The 
Directors of the College, the Commit' 
tee of Seven Women's Colleges, and the 
committees of the Association feel that 
it is in that field that one must work for 
gifts. Mrs. Slade explained one plan 
whereby if the College were made the 
ultimate recipient of a bequest, it could 
administer the fund and pay the interest 
from it to any named beneficiary for life. 

Before the meeting adjourned the ques- 
tion of the relationship between the clubs 
and the Association was brought up. In 
its last analysis it is really a question of 
bringing more of the alumnae in closer 
touch with the College, since in the clubs, 
as they are now organized, there are non- 
Association members as well as members. 
It was suggested that the clubs be urged 
to send representatives at the time of the 
Alumnae Week-end, and that there be a 
meeting of such representatives at that 
time. To help make this possible the 
Association could undertake to see that 
they were entertained. 

The meeting then adjourned because 
Elizabeth Lawrence Mendell, 1925, 
Councillor for the District, had asked old 
and also potential friends of Bryn Mawr 
to tea to meet the members of the Council 
at her house. Before the tea was over, 
the people especially concerned with 

I scholarships began leaving for their spe- 
cial conference. 
That evening only the Council mem- 
bers met once more for the type of in- 
formal discussion that had proved so 



in no sense a business meeting there is an 
opportunity for a kind of give-and-take, 
and question-and-answer about both 
Association and College matters that is 
out of place when formal reports are 
under consideration. 

At the Alumnae Luncheon last June 
Miss Park reminded us that inevitably 
the time of her retirement was approach- 
ing; discussion now naturally turned to 
the relation of alumnae opinion to the 
problem that the Directors will be facing 
in two years in appointing a new presi- 
dent. The alumnae will want to mark 
their appreciation of Miss Park's years 
of distinguished service to Bryn Mawr 
and the most fitting way of doing so was 
discussed. Following this the question of 
the functions and duties of the Alumnae 
Directors, in relation both to the College 
and the Association, was taken up. 

REPORTS OF STANDING 
COMMITTEES 

Following the pleasant pattern set up 
last year, on Friday the Council became 
peripatetic, and held its morning meeting 
at Westover School, twenty-five miles 
from New Haven, thus enabling rather a 
different group to meet with it. In the 
absence of the Chairman, M. Elizabeth 
Howe, 1924, her report for the Commit' 
tee on Health and Physical Education was 
read by the Secretary. In it Dr. Howe 
spoke of the program of the College De- 
partment of Health and Physical Educa- 
tion, which was presented in the March 
Bulletin. This closely followed the 
points presented in her report at the 
Annual Meeting last June. In closing 
she hoped that the Executive Board would 
submit the program to the Association 
"with recommendations for vigorous 
financial support/ 1 

Next Caroline Lynch Byers, 1920, 
presented the report for the Scholarships 



[3] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



and Loan Fund Committee, giving as 
always a picture of a busy year. Of the 
four hundred and fifty'three undergradu- 
ate students in College, one hundred and 
twenty- five hold scholarships or grants; 
forty-one of these are Regional Scholars. 
The problems created by the Loan Fund 
vary little from year to year. The com- 
mittee has compiled a good deal of inter- 
esting and useful information and made it 
available for the Regional Committees 
for which it acts as a clearing-house. 

The report for the Academic Commit- 
tee presented by Louise Dillingham, 1916, 
followed. She stated that it was impossible 
to give a full report until the question- 
naires on the subject of Phi Beta Kappa, 
published in the February Bulletin, had 
been worked over. There was nothing 
controversial in these three reports, which 
were accepted with little discussion. The 
next report, that of the Nominating Com- 
mittee, presented by Serena Hand Sav- 
age, 1922, aroused the lively discussion, 
which the Chairman had asked might 
follow. The Ballot is printed on pp. 16-18 
of this Bulletin. 

Mrs. Savage brought up specific points 
which she wished to have discussed, in 
addition to the old question of single 
versus double slate, which the committee 
had answered for itself this year by pre- 
senting not a double but a triple slate! 
First she asked the Council to define 
somewhat the duties of the Alumnae Di- 
rectors, so that a candidate might know 
what her obligations were. The feeling 
seemed to be that the Alumnae Director 
must represent the Alumnae Association 
on the Board of Directors. This feeling 
is written into the revised By-laws, with 
the provision for two joint meetings a 
year of the Alumnae Directors and the 
Executive Board. 

Only second in importance is the obli- 
gation of the Alumnae Director to repre- 



sent the College and interpret it sympa- 
thetically in her own region. She is 
always by the nature of her high office 
a representative of the College. She 
should know intimately not only the 
Alumnae Association but the College, and 
should spend some time on the campus 
either before or after the Directors' meet- 
ings, and should make it her business to 
talk to both the officials and the students. 
The next point brought forward, because 
the committee, although clear in its own 
mind, wished an expression of opinion 
from the Council, was that of the single 
or the double slate: how to make the 
choice of a candidate as representative as 
possible and how to interest new people 
was another aspect of the question, but 
one closely tied up with the considera- 
tion of the double or single slate. Con- 
sultation with the District Councillors, or 
even a special meeting of the Councillors 
and the Chairman of the Nominating 
Committee at the Council were methods 
suggested. It was also put forward that 
any club with a membership of at least 
twenty-five has the right to suggest a 
nominee. This would, of course, be dif- 
ferent from nomination by petition be- 
cause the name would come to the Nom- 
inating Committee before and not after 
the ballot was made up. The Director-in- 
Residence said that she felt that she 
should report to the Alumnae Association 
as well as to the College the trends in 
the various Districts, and her impressions 
would complement those of the Council- 
lors. Before the discussion was closed and 
the report accepted, the Chairman said, 
in reply to a question, that she had not 
received, as a result of the notice that 
was carried in the November Bulletin, 
any suggestions as to candidates for the 
offices to be filled but that it would be 
worth while to continue the experiment; 
next year there will be ten offices to fill. 



[4] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Following this discussion, the report of 
the senior Alumnae Director, Eleanor 
Little Aldrich, 1905, was particularly per- 
tinent. It is printed on pp. 19-20. The 
awareness of a desire for a closer con- 
tact between the Alumnae Association 
and the Board of Directors, that she pre- 
sented in it, was another way of express- 
ing the quick interest of the alumnae in 
the College, and their faith in the role 
that it has to play. The practical steps 
that both the Association and the Alum- 
nae Direcors are taking are specifically 
outlined in the report. 

The report of the By-Laws Committee 
followed the report of the Alumnae Di- 
rectors, but it really should have a sec- 
tion to itself, and for that reason it seems 
better in this running account to leave 
for a moment the chronological order and 
to speak of the other question brought 
up for discussion, the formation of a 
Graduate Chapter of the Alumnae Asso- 
ciation. The report was presented by 
Mary Sweeney, former graduate student 
and Chairman of the Special Committee 
appointed to study the question. The 
problem was what form of organisation 
would best serve the interests of the for- 
mer graduate students and keep them in 
touch with the College and with each 
other, as well as keep them an integral 
part of the Association. At the present 
time, the Radcliffe plan, as presented by 
Miss Sweeney, did not seem to the Coun- 
cil adapted to conditions at Bryn Mawr. 
The second plan, suggested by two mem- 
bers of her committee, the Dean of the 
Graduate School and the Senior Resident 
in Radnor, was for an experimental 
year, the details to be worked out by a 
committee consisting of the President of 
the Alumnae Association, the Alumnae 
Secretary, the Dean of the Graduate 
School, and the Senior Resident, in con- 
sultation with the present committee, the 



Graduate Editor and the Graduate Col- 
lectors. This plan was approved by the 
Council. This tentative plan included a 
membership drive; special and appropriate 
literature to go to the graduate members 
of the Association; and the organisation 
of general activities; for instance, special 
meetings at the time of the Alumnae 
Week-end, or Commencement, that would 
strengthen existing ties. It was felt that 
editors in special fields of interest rather 
than for different classes of academic de- 
grees would bring new life into the 
Bulletin notes. 

PROPOSED CHANGES IN 
THE BY-LAWS 
In presenting her report, Lois Kellogg 
Jessup, 1920, Chairman of the Special 
By-Laws Committee, said that she hoped 
not only for a full discussion, but to 
embody the Council's suggestions or rec- 
ommendations in the revised draught 
which would be sent to all members of 
the Association; so that when the ques- 
tion of the By-Laws comes up for con- 
sideration at the Annual Meeting, lengthy 
discussion will not be necessary. This re- 
vised draught of the proposed changes 
will be sent with the May Bulletin in 
the form of a supplement, which will also 
contain a statement from Mrs. Jessup 
about the major changes which affect 
Association policy. Some of the other 
changes merely formulate policies already 
in effect. These major changes are seven 
in number. 

Major Changes 

(1) The eligibility of Associate Mem- 
bers to all offices except that of Alumnae 
Director. 

(2) The staggering of the terms of 
office of the officers of the Association. 

(3) The duties and responsibilities of 
the Alumnae Directors, and the strength- 
ening of their relation to the Association 



m 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



through closer contact with the Executive 
Board. 

(4) The change in the terms of office 
of the Health and Physical Education 
Committee to make them similar to those 
of the Academic Committee. 

(5) The change in the method of vot- 
ing so that the unsigned ballot can be sent 
in a signed envelope. 

(6) The change in name of the Direc- 
tors at Large of the Association to Cor- 
responding Secretary and to Second Vice- 
President, and of the Alumnae Secretary 
to Executive Secretary. 

(7) The elimination of the office of 
Director of Publicity. (The functions of 
this office have now been taken over by 
the College.) 

The discussion was close and interested, 
and in the instances where the points 
were debatable, the arguments were care- 
fully weighed, but there was no quibbling 
over non-essentials. The general drift of 
the discussion on the question of increas- 
ing the opportunities for service for Asso- 
ciate members showed a desire on the part 
of the Council to take complete cogni- 
sance of the valuable and devoted service 
already rendered both the College and 
the Association by non- alumnae. The sug- 
gested change in the method of voting, 
i. e. by secret ballot, was accepted without 
question as being the genuinely democratic 
way. What Mrs. Jessup did not point 
out but what any one immediately saw 
for herself was the clarity of organisation 
in the proposed change in the order of 
the By-Laws; sections that belong together 
are now put together. If the Association 
accepts this change, the long hours of 
"searching the By-Laws 11 will be a thing 
of the past. 

The report was accepted with the ex- 
pression of deep appreciation of the work 
of the Chairman and of the Committee. 



PHASES OF THE COLLEGE 

The Council interrupted its considera' 
tion of the By-Laws to drive to Water- 
town to Starkweather House, the home 
of Florence Martin Chase, 1923, and 
then settled down to business again. 

At the conclusion of the discussion of 
the proposed changes in the By-Laws, the 
Council turned its attention back again 
to the College itself and evaluated the 
reports that followed not only in terms 
of what the various changes that have 
taken place on the campus, both material 
and intellectual, mean to the students 
now, but what they will mean to the stU' 
dents when they come to play their part 
in an unstable world, a theme presented 
and elaborated on by President Park 
when she spoke to the Council after the 
dinner in her honour, this second day of 
the Council. Excerpts from her speech are 
printed on pp. 10-14 of this Bulletin. 

Before the scheduled reports on dif- 
ferent aspects of the College, and indeed 
before the report by Miss Sweeney was 
given, the Director in Residence brought 
up a question in connection with scholar' 
ships which President Park had asked her 
to present to the Council for discussion. 
The problem bore on differentiating be- 
tween scholarships awarded for academic 
achievement and those to meet financial 
need. Immediate and interested discus- 
sion followed, and although no definite 
conclusion was reached, the Council 
stated its interest in and approval of a pos- 
sible plan for making students feel a sense 
of responsibility toward the College, ex- 
pressed perhaps in a service rendered to 
the College, in exchange for scholarship 
aid given primarily to relieve financial 
necessity. 

A vivid picture of the College was pre- 
sented in the four reports given respec- 
tively from the point of view of the 
undergraduates, the graduate students, 



C6] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



the faculty, and the Directors. Alice 
Chase, 1938, was very enthusiastic about 
the increased opportunity for study 
abroad and the French and German 
Houses, and the fact that speaking 
French or German is now to a number 
of the undergraduates an integral part 
of their college life. Ann Toll, 1939, 
opened her speech by saying: "Changes 
of every sort are taking place around 
us — changes in the academic scheme of 
things, changes in extra-curricular activi- 
ties, and material changes in the ground 
plan of the College. 11 After outlining 
these changes, already familiar to the con- 
scientious Bulletin reader, she stressed 
the fact that more than ever before the 
College is taking an interest, through its 
own organisations, in affairs beyond the 
campus. She added, "These groups serve 
above all to stimulate thought and discus- 
sion among the students. 11 The Graduate 
Representative, Virginia Peterson, fo- 
cused the attention of the Council very 
sharply on the theme that had occurred 
again and again, in one variation or an- 
other, through all the sessions of the 
Council. After speaking of the devotion 
to academic excellence and the precision 
of workmanship that so impressed her at 
Bryn Mawr, she went on to say: "It 
seems to me that now when women's 
right to learning has ceased to be a 'cause, 1 
we must be even more certain that 
women's place in the world is a justifiably 
significant one. In any kind of life, in 
any position, to carry over from the aca- 
demic world to the social — particularly 
the political one, the scholarly method of 
thought, the habit of mind which takes a 
problem, now insoluble, and submits it to 
investigation with the hope that future in- 
vestigators may not find it so, is to justify 
our place. ... If our democracy allows 
us freedom of study, we must be willing 
to offer it constructive participation. 11 



Mary Gardiner, 1918, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Biology, spoke as Ann Toll had 
done, of the changes on the campus, but 
in presenting the faculty point of view, 
she presented the other side of the shield. 
She told all of the concrete things that 
the Council was eager to know and in 
concluding gave her version of the theme 
that had rung out so clearly in Miss 
Peterson's report. She said that she hoped 
that whoever spoke next year about the 
Library would be able to tell us "as sin- 
cerely as I have been able to do for the 
sciences that all the effort that has been 
put into the planning and the getting and 
the doing has not been in vain, and that 
because of it we are able to work a little 
better, to teach a little better, and per- 
haps to make Bryn Mawr a little better. 11 

REPORT OF THE EDITOR OF THE 

ALUMNAE BULLETIN AND OF 

THE DISTRICT COUNCILLORS 

This grouping of reports was really a 
matter of expediency but it proved ex- 
tremely useful, and is a plan that might 
be followed again; it underlined the fact 
that the Bulletin Board is constantly 
trying to find out how it can best serve 
the interests of the alumnae, and the 
Councillors are the members of the Coun- 
cil who can best answer the questions put 
by the Editor of the Bulletin. After 
her report, which was really a history of 
expanding co-operation, the discussion 
that followed made it very clear that, fol- 
lowing the general pattern of the whole 
Council, the Councillors were anxious 
this year to send to the non-members in 
their Districts not reprints of the general 
account of the Council, but reprints of 
President Park's speech, in order to 
awaken fresh interest in the College. 

The District reports, as one hears them 
one after another, are very impressive. 



[7] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



They are a chronicle of devoted service, 
and if a Councillor feels she has not 
done all she hoped to do, she eagerly asks 
the Council to tell her ways of accom- 
plishing more. 

District I., under the direction of Elis- 
abeth Lawrence Mendell, 1925, in whose 
hospitable precincts the Council was meet- 
ing, reported eight new members, one of 
them a life member, as a result of the 
Council reprints sent out last year. Its 
three clubs and its fourteen scholars in 
College are a credit to it. In discussing 
the Council itself, Mrs. Mendell said that 
in formulating her plans for it, she had 
hoped that it would serve not only as a 
point of contact between Bryn Mawr and 
non-Bryn Mawr people, but that it could 
also be used to interest alumnae in as 
wide an area as possible. For that reason 
the sessions had been held in different 
places and all alumnae in Connecticut 
had been invited. In closing she asked 
the Council to consider the possibility of 
extending the time covered by the Coun- 
cil in order to avoid a crowded schedule 
that curtailed discussion. 

District II., with Ruth Cheney Streeter, 
1918, as its Councillor, also has fourteen 
scholars in College. Mrs. Streeter spoke 
appreciatively of the letter sent from the 
Board of Directors of the College, ex- 
pressing their thanks to all who have 
helped in scholarship work. She paid her 
own tribute to her four scholarship chair- 
men. The New York Club is flourishing 
in its new quarters at The Barclay; the 
Pittsburgh and the Montclair, New Jer- 
sey, Clubs work very closely with their 
local scholarships chairmen; the Delaware 
group is not active but contributes gen- 
erously to scholarships; the two problem 
groups in the District, as far as organisa- 
tion goes, are those nearest to the College 
and those farthest from it, although they 
are problems for quite different reasons. 



District III., the District of the South, 
now under the direction of Mildred Kim- 
ball Ruddock, 1936, continues to make 
history. Its Councillor has followed the 
pattern set by her predecessor in having 
State Chairmen wherever possible, and 
has eight clubs in her far-flung District. 
Washington and Baltimore really are in- 
dependent units within the District but 
counting them in as part of it, there are 
five scholars from the South. Washington 
is planning to raise its scholarship money 
by having a benefit performance of Can' 
dida in which Cornelia Otis Skinner, 
1922, is playing. Of special interest is 
Mrs. Ruddock's carefully planned cam- 
paign to interest the schools in her Dis- 
trict in Bryn Mawr and to present it 
sympathetically to them. She spoke very 
warmly of how much interest had been 
aroused in the District by the visit of the 
Director in Residence, and asked for 
more of that closer relationship with the 
College. 

District IV., also a scattered District 
and one with comparatively few alumnae, 
has, the Councillor, Ruth Biddle Penfield, 
1929, reported, two scholars in College, 
four of the five city clubs are flourishing, 
with the Columbus one planning a lunch- 
eon in honour of Cornelia Otis Skinner 
and Dorothy Sands. Already very careful 
and enthusiastic plans are being made for 
the visit next fall of the Director in Resi- 
dence. In closing, Mrs. Penfield asked 
that some more definite recognition be 
given the scholarship chairmen. In her 
own District she works very closely with 
her Chairman, and felt that it would be 
helpful if the Councillor's expense fund 
could be opened to the Chairmen or if 
occasionally they could come to the 
Council. 

District V., as far as its activities went, 
Eloise ReQua, 1924, reported, was 
really the Chicago Bryn Mawr Club. 



[8] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



A fairly established routine has proved 
itself both effective and pleasant. The 
money for the four scholars now in 
College was raised by direct subscrip- 
tion. A certain amount of work with the 
schools is done every year and shows 
definite results. The proposed visit of the 
Director in Residence next year, the 
Councillor hoped, would result in wider 
organisation. 

District VI. has one scholar, but if the 
plans of the Councillor, Delia Smith 
Mares, 1926, work out as she hopes, in- 
terest will spread well beyond the active 
group in St. Louis who at present supply 
most of the scholarship funds. In this 
District, co-operation with the Seven 
Women's Colleges groups has proved the 
best way of drawing together scattered 
alumnae. 

District VII. has as Councillor Kath- 
arine Collins Hayes, 1929. She was 
unable to come to the Council and so her 
report was presented by Hilda Wright 
Broad, 1929. One scholar comes from the 
District, and the problem of interesting 
the schools in sending their students to 
Bryn Mawr is a pressing one, just as it is 
in District III. The Councillor expressed 
in warm terms her appreciation of what 
Miss Park's earlier visit, and last summer 
the visit from the Director in Residence, 
had meant in giving the alumnae a sense 
of contact with the College. She echoed 
the wish, expressed by other Councillors 
whose Districts are geographically distant 
from the College, that such visits might 
be repeated at regular intervals. 

Frances Fincke Hand, 1897, herself a 
member of the Board of Directors, and 
one of the most honoured guests of the 
Council, as the Bryn Mawr member of 
the Committee of the Seven Women's 
Colleges, reported an amazing amount of 
activity on the part of her committee in 
connection with general publicity. 

[9 



Barbara Gary, 1936, in charge of pub- 
licity at Bryn Mawr, then described the 
movies which the College itself is having 
taken. They are being taken by a pro- 
fessional company and will be in full 
colour. There will be indoor and outdoor 
pictures, class-room and extra-curricular 
activities, with the campus and buildings 
as a background. 

Another way of maintaining close touch 
with the College was pointed up very 
clearly when the discussion turned back 
to certain points in the Councillors' re- 
ports and had to do with the great value 
of having an official of the College visit 
in the Districts, and with having the 
Councillor go as much as possible into the 
different parts of the District with the 
visiting official. Miss Park was a guest at 
this morning session. The President of the 
Alumnae Association expressed the feeling 
of the Council when she said, "I am im- 
pressed by the enthusiasm, imagination and 
initiative of the Councillors. . . . There is 
necessity for more contact with the College 
through people actually connected with 
the College." The Director in Residence, 
speaking from her own experience in the 
South and West, paid a warm tribute to 
the admirable co-operation the alumnae in 
the Districts had given her, and stressed the 
different types of contribution that differ- 
ent officials can make. The vote of thanks to 
the retiring Councillors was very sincere. 

It was with genuine regret that the 
members of the Council felt the time had 
come to adjourn. The sessions had been 
full, but the planning was so careful that 
one was conscious of pleasantness and 
stimulus rather than pressure. The mo- 
tion of thanks and appreciation to Eliza- 
beth Lawrence Mendell and all the 
New Haven Alumnae, to Louise Dilling- 
ham and to Florence Martin Chase, and 
to our individual hostesses for all their 
hospitality, was warmly seconded. 

1 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



BUILDING FOR SECURITY IN AN INSECURE WORLD 

EXCERPTS FROM PRESIDENT PARK'S SPEECH DELIVERED AT 
THE ALUMNAE COUNCIL IN NEW HAVEN, MARCH 10, 1939 



YOU, the Council and I, the execu- 
tive, should be better able than 
others to spread out in our minds 
a kind of blue-print on which discussions 
and in the end proposals could be based. 
It might read for instance : Bryn Mawr is 
an experiment in which many altruistic 
persons, its own graduates included, have 
combined to put money and work and 
thought. The backers of the experiment 
have believed it important to make and 
keep available a post-school, intellectual 
training of a realistic type, carefully 
organised in its set-up and varied in 
its content, for a few hundred girls who 
are ready to take it on; they have there- 
fore put up a dosen buildings, collected 
men and women, books and science ap- 
paratus to instruct them, enough execu- 
tives to keep the organisation going. They 
have done this for one reason only: their 
belief in its importance. In part the im- 
portance they see is to the lives of in- 
dividual women, in part to the commu- 
nity of America, of which Bryn Mawr 
graduates are an infinitesimal part, but 
presumably by reason of their experi- 
ence at Bryn Mawr more usable, wherever 
they are, to the great whole, more efficient, 
more interested. These altruists have put 
into this organised experiment so far in 
round numbers about $10,000,000. They 
have asked the young women taking ad- 
vantage of it each to pay something 
toward the general expenses of. the experi- 
ment — as a symbol of its individual ad- 
vantage to her, though not in any sense 
a price; all the difference they have made 
and are making up as a gift to the Ameri- 
can community. 

Let this or something better stand as a 

[10 



blue-print of this fifty-year-old experi- 
ment, now ours. We with all thoughtful 
Bryn Mawr alumnae are its stewards. It 
seems to me that as such now and in the 
immediate future we have at least two 
plain responsibilities. First, to keep the 
complicated organisation of the experi- 
ment at work and as effectively as pos- 
sible; second, to keep it steadily directed 
toward the purpose for which it was 
created. 

These responsibilities bring us face to 
face with a problem which is at the 
moment continuous in its pressure, per- 
vading, and hard: how in our plans can 
we build security in insecurity, both 
material and spiritual. The problem itself 
is uralt, the most ancient, I suppose, of 
human difficulties, individual and general, 
but for the generations of Bryn Mawr it 
is new. Miss Thomas, for instance, hardly 
knew it. Her energy was given to almost 
its opposite — creating what would be rev- 
olutionary in a world of order! It is only 
the youngest alumnae, born since 1914, 
who have opened their eyes on it daily, 
and, parenthetically, perhaps they will 
have the best answers. Yet all who are 
interested in Bryn Mawr from Victorians 
down must give attention to it with hope 
that together or individually we may 
come on some wisdom in our dilemma — 
on a method of financial procedure or 
even an indication of one, on a wise turn 
in academic policy, on a way of more 
direct assistance to students in a sea of 
troubles. Here are three aspects of the 
problem which hovers over our blue-print. 
They are not a logical succession as our 
ancestors 1 sermons would have demanded, 
rather disconnected close-ups: the imme- 

1 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



diate finance plan, the insecure faculty, 
recognition of the undergraduate's future. 

First, Bryn Mawr, like all other en- 
dowed colleges, is eying its financial 
future with some apprehension. Unlike 
other colleges, one of its two sources of 
income is on the way to increasing, the 
second is dropping. Income from invest- 
ments fell from an average of 4 J/2% last 
year to 4 J/4% this year and will be no 
more than 4 % next year. Thanks to good 
fortune and to painstaking thrift we shall 
close the year with no deficit and with 
all our plans for it carried through. Two 
recent additions to our principal funds 
raised their sum total and added income: 
the gift of $150,000 from the Carnegie 
Corporation for endowment of the joint 
plan of teaching the sciences, and the 
$100,000 Riegel bequest given without 
strings. But also the College is being 
closely run, witness the offices of Mr. 
Hurst, Mr. Foley and Miss Howe. Mr. 
Frank Stokes has set his clear and clever 
brains at cutting down certain heavy an- 
nual expenses by, for instance, power 
house adjustments. This is the right kind 
of thrift. . . . Our second source of in- 
come, students 1 fees, will rise certainly 
and markedly when Rhoads North is 
filled. . . . Out of Rhoads South this 
year we have had the new income to 
meet the new outgo; we shall not count 
on much more until Rhoads North is 
filled and the present general overhead is 
more economically divided. ... To sum 
up, the College is left next year to meet a 
considerable drop in its income. . . . 

May I break away to say that I can 
hardly tell you what it means in this 
budget-making March to have coming 
directly into the faculty salary item the 
annual gift of the alumnae. I wish that 
all burdened class collectors and givers 
could know as the Treasurer, the Finance 
Committee and the President and the 

[ 



faculty do what this steadying gift has 
done for everyone who knows it. . . . 

The best of the situation should also 
be reported. 

Bryn Mawr's drop in interest on in- 
vestments, in two years about one ninth, 
should be matched with the greater drop 
reported almost universally elsewhere and 
it is incredibly fortunate that another 
source of income, safe and considerable, 
a new type of investment for Bryn Mawr 
funds, is coming into action in a short 
year. Further, the two desperately needed 
buildings for science are finished, almost 
paid for and thoroughly satisfactory; for 
the library we have money and good plans 
within the limits of our cash. Lastly the 
College has in its Trustee Board a set of 
the wisest advisers and investors in the 
country. . . . 

It is superhumanly hard to isolate any 
part of the College and get a good look 
at it. Its close organisation interlocks 
every section, almost every person with 
every other; freshmen and graduates use 
the same buildings and campus, eat the 
same food and alike grow great; the same 
faculty teach freshmen and near-Ph.D.'s; 
sixteen young women (and one young 
man) are both faculty and students, i. e. 
both teach and learn; the faculty is of 
both sexes; the student body has and 
shortly the Alumnae Association will 
have a peppering of males. But for the 
moment I should like to isolate the Bryn 
Mawr faculty and talk about its members 
as a group. They are the mercury in the 
glass or, if you like, the yeast in the 
dough. In the nature of things no body of 
students, good or bad, young or mature, 
will rise and stay risen with second-rate 
teachers to look at and hear day after day. 
I have been all these types of student; 
sat under good and poor teachers and 
know. Again general academic interest 
centers on them, into dead routine they 

11] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



put the life and I am therefore much 
more interested actually in Bryn Mawr's 
faculty than in its admission requirements 
or its requirements for degrees or its 
curriculum. 

It is to you that I look for a similar 
interest. Responsible alumnae and in par' 
ticular the alumnae of the Council sise up 
faculty importance, I find, as I do, and 
feel it worthwhile to study their situation 
at Bryn Mawr carefully. In doing this 
we are lumbermen continually testing the 
cutting edge of the axe; its proportion, 
its weight, its excellence as a tool all are 
effective if it is kept sharp. 

Miss Thomas thought of herself quite 
rightly as a good chooser of faculty but I 
think of myself just as well, and I don't 
believe that at any one moment in the Col' 
lege history there has been an abler group 
of men and women. One thing Bryn 
Mawr owes to Miss Thomas: clever men 
and women have been glad to come here 
and university departments have been 
glad to send them. I have found it rela' 
tively easy to continue the lively current 
setting toward us. 

I want to speak briefly of the ques- 
tions whose settlement makes for the 
permanency of faculty satisfaction and 
whose continued non'settlement makes it 
restless and insecure. Two are directly 
financial as is natural and right. Bryn 
Mawr salaries average still slightly, but 
too slightly, higher than those of other 
women's colleges but they are not quite 
so good as those of the colleges for men 
like Amherst, Williams, Dartmouth, and 
considerably less than those of the great 
universities which we can not venture to 
rival. Our astute 1930 Plan Committee 
had hoped that the new hall and the 
raised tuition would in the end make it 
possible to increase our whole faculty 
scale, say to the best college (as opposed 
to university) rate. What I have said 



earlier shows you that that good plan is 
endangered and that our new income may 
only fill up the measure to its old height. 
I am much concerned over the salary 
scale and I find it hard to know where to 
turn for a solution. . . . 

A second financial problem for the 
faculty is the meagre pension system 
whose burden on us is nevertheless heavy 
and may be increased by the extension of 
the Social Security Act. The joint invest- 
ment remains or rather becomes still less 
adequate for individual teachers as in' 
come rates on pension funds and savings 
bank funds go down. An excellent com' 
mittee has worked over the subject with 
the idea of proposing that the first advan- 
tage to the faculty from the new student 
income should be turned to pensions, not 
salaries, but after long consultation with 
the Finance Committee of the Board it 
decided to postpone any formal plan or 
request. In the matter of pensions Bryn 
Mawr stands close to other colleges, but it 
has one of the earliest retirement ages so 
that its problem is in the end acute. . . . 

A third problem of the teacher at Bryn 
Mawr is the pressure on his time. He 
has always been urged into research 
work, and since the Plan of Government 
went into effect he has had heavy com' 
mittee work, for the faculty is genuinely 
powerful at Bryn Mawr and power is 
time consuming. Now, first the introduc- 
tion of the single major, and then of 
honours work, have increased his respon- 
sibility for the separate student. His time 
is filled very full — over- full in many 
cases. I myself believe that free Satur- 
days and fifteen or sixteen free weeks in 
the summer are delusive and that a longer 
week and year with less tension would 
prove a calming solution. The students 
have formally suggested an extra week in 
the year but the faculty has not agreed. 
If I had the funds for it, I think an ex- 



[12] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



tension of the system of teaching fellows 
to many departments could be made to 
everyone's advantage, and especially in 
the laboratory work and in the reading of 
papers, time saved for the direct contact 
which is heaven-sent to the good student 
and the good teacher. Meantime the fac- 
ulty are worn but alive, undergraduate 
teaching is really good in many cases I 
believe, and rarely poor, faculty publica- 
tions make an astonishingly fine show in 
the President's Report, our small research 
fund, $1000, is assigned to the last penny, 
four professors, Dr. Carpenter, Dr. Bern- 
heimer, Dr. Nahm and Dr. Koffka of 
Smith, are again giving a rapid fire series 
of eight lectures and conferences on The 
Approaches to Art in April, the plans for 
next year's science teaching are wonder- 
fully good. . . . 

And last, I wish to ask you whether 
we can conjure up for the young women 
in view of whom Bryn Mawr was planted 
on its airy hill anything which will help 
them more directly as individuals to meet 
this world dilemma, security in insecur- 
ity. Please remember that I begin "I am 
not sure we can." I am not sure that our 
old, impersonal program is not still the 
most maturing, the least cramping on the 
individual that we can devise. Yet the 
exigency our coming graduates are to 
meet is so sharp that I am driven into at 
least putting the question before you who 
are in this matter, for clear reasons, Bryn 
Mawr's wisest counsellors. 

They are worth great efforts. The 
calibre of the present undergraduates is 
as good as I have ever known it. The 
academic work is I believe at an all-time 
high. The students who fairly consis- 
tently steer the Senior Class and hence 
the College attitudes have hardly been 
matched in my experience for a combina- 
tion of brains and maturity. You who 
have been at general meetings, who see 

[13 



the 1^[ews and the undergraduate pages 
of the Bulletin, the Executive Commit- 
tee which has shared the experience of 
the College Council meetings: both have 
impressions of the class of this year which 
will I think confirm mine. But the older 
students are followed down the line by 
equally satisfactory younger sisters. The 
preliminary list for the Hinchman Prise, 
the greatest College honour in my estima- 
tion, reached me this week and I find, 
instead of three or four juniors, seven or 
eight likely to be put forward by their 
departments for it. The Freshman Class 
is Bryn Mawr's largest and its members 
on the Senate list in February the fewest 
in all Bryn Mawr records. All this means 
that the resources we are organizing are 
put at the service of really admirable 
young women. That I can say, knowing 
all the weak spots in our undergraduate 
armour. They are thoughtful and inde- 
pendent; once out of adolescent self- 
centredness, they are public-spirited. I 
point to the many public discussions, the 
carefully thought-out giving (for the 
League, the Summer School, the Work- 
shop and the Refugee Scholarships), the 
well-run independent organizations like 
the Art Club, the Modern Dance Class, 
to support my point. I hope fervently 
and prayerfully that our increasing num- 
bers will bring us an increase at the same 
time of these qualities now ruling the 
College. And I hope in particular that 
every member of the Council will go 
home resolved to send to the College some 
young friend who will easily and interest- 
edly form part of our lively group and 
who is not a scholarship student, but her 
intellectual twin. 

But a natural encomium on Bryn Mawr 
undergraduates brings me at once to the 
point of my developing concern. For 
their own sake, because they are not good 
students only, but good and valuable 

] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



human beings, even more for the sake 
of the communities into which they will 
scatter, can we do anything to free them 
from undue discouragement and appre- 
hension in the first years after they leave 
Bryn Mawr? Can we legitimately help 
them to feel self-confidence and some de- 
gree of courage? Is there a bridge to self- 
reliance which we can help them to 
build — the beginners on their own in mat- 
rimony, or life with the family, or volun- 
teer jobs or unemployment? for their own 
sakes and the sake of the Kingdom of 
Heaven, shall I say. The fruits of dis- 
couragement and fear are not generous 
liberalism, and our new democracy if it 
is to take shape must be essentially con- 
fident and courageous. As they leave 
Bryn Mawr I should like to feel that 
the majority of undergraduates are as 
well prepared to shift for themselves in 
family life, in public work, as individuals 
and citizens, as the minority who go 
into medicine, say, or teaching are pre- 
pared to deal with the beginnings of 
professional work. I have been thinking 
fitfully on this line in the last few years 
and I have tried my ideas on two outside 
audiences so that I may have them in 
final shape for Bryn Mawr itself, perhaps 
in June : should we, even in our straitened 
coming decade, prepare ourselves to em- 
phasise several of our departments, biol- 
ogy, psychology and philosophy for in- 
stance, to strengthen the hands of the 
Bryn Mawr graduate, a professional 
woman perhaps, almost certainly married 
with children to bring up and potential 
roots and growth in her community. I 
hope that you may be interested in think- 
ing your way to some use of these fields 
which at no sacrifice of scientific point of 
view or achievement will in more cases 
than now form a solid basis under the 



feet of the young woman who in the next 
few years will go out from the College. 

One more gift I yearn to give her and 
the College: more easy and satisfactory 
contact with arts. I should like to add 
to the permanent choir training — so beau- 
tifully done, so delighted in by the com- 
munity and the College — a permanent 
opportunity for instrumental music such 
as has been given us this year, violins, 
flutes and pianos, every hall collecting 
for two weekly bouts of chamber music. 
I look forward with enthusiasm to easier 
work in acting made possible by the 
Theatre Workshop and in dancing, paint- 
ing, and photography. This I want pri- 
marily for the use of the individual later 
in her new community, not only as 
pleasure for herself, but as a means of 
knowing other people, a means of making 
as good a contribution to her country, 
perhaps, as going into mild public affairs. 

The attempt at Bryn Mawr to find a 
good plan for the four last years of 
women's formal education is working re- 
markably well. In other words, the at- 
tempt for which the Council as the inner 
group of alumnae is to an important de- 
gree responsible, is worth its attention. 
The College is alive, able to change and 
able to solidify. In particular the two 
great groups who are themselves the ex- 
periment, the teachers and the learners, 
are interested in it and themselves as 
making it up and benefitting or suffering 
through it. This makes its organisation 
seem to me as I see it less mechanical 
than ever before, more bone and muscle 
and less steel and riveting. It is some- 
what exhausting but unfailingly lively to 
sit near its centre and to be as sure as I 
am that we are working at something 
which is good of its kind and, further, is 
of a kind which the world wants. 



As the Bulletin goes to press word has come of the death of Dr. Tenney Frank 
who has been lecturing at Oxfor d on the Eastman Visiting Professorship. 

[14] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



MISS HELBURN AND MISS HEPBURN ENTERTAIN 



THERESA HELBURN, 1908, and 
Katharine Hepburn, 1928, gave 
Bryn Mawr a party on the after- 
noon of February 28th — a real party with 
lots of gaiety, glamor and a nice solid 
present of $2100 to take home afterwards 
in our hot little hands. 

The special performance of Philip 
Barry's new play, Philadelphia Story, pro- 
duced by The Theatre Guild, starring 
Katharine Hepburn, was an occasion to 
warm the heart of alma mater. The 
pleasant sight of Taylor Hall and Broad- 
way meeting one another with open arms 
is not a usual one. But thanks to the 
enterprising loyalty of Miss Helburn, 
Executive Secretary of the Theatre Guild, 
in collaboration with Miss Hepburn of 
Bryn Mawr College and Hollywood, this 
exciting reunion did take place. And all 
of Bryn Mawr, faculty, alumnae, under- 
graduates were there to applaud. 

The cause for which the benefit was 
given was that favorite one of the Col- 
lege at this time, the Mrs. Otis Skinner 
Theatre Workshop, and the profits of the 
afternoon, the largest single gift so far 
made. 

Seeing people in the flesh who have 
been much photographed and talked 
about is always interesting. It would 
have been interesting to see Miss Hep- 
burn, even if she had not been playing 
such a good part. For Philadelphia 
Story is just witty, madcap and genu- 
inely stirring enough to be the perfect 
vehicle for her. When to this is added 
her own spirited beauty, the voice that 
has taught the waste places of the earth 
that Americans do speak English, the 
clothes that da^led even the academic 
eye, it is no wonder that the audience 
became hilarious. 



To those who remembered Miss Hep- 
burn as a student — and many were pres- 
ent, as she remarked in her curtain 
speech — the change in her, even after all 
the successful motion pictures, seemed 
somehow incredible. We could still see 
the girl with the tight bun of reddish 
hair, screwed up on the top of her head, 
scurrying into the library with an armful 
of books. (Miss Hepburn playing Miss 
Hepburn, under the direction of Dr. 
Gray, was the title of that drama.) Or 
we could see her on that one occasion 
when she gave a hint of things to come, 
dressed in the Greek costume of The 
Woman in the Moon, walking barefoot 
in the May Day procession, not noticing 
the sharpness of the gravel in front of 
the grandstand. There were no talent 
scouts present, but many appreciators, as 
there were on this later occasion. 

Following the matinee and Miss Hep- 
burn's excellent curtain speech, shortened 
by the weight of a mountainous bouquet 
of yellow and white flowers presented by 
the Undergraduate Association, the party 
adjourned to The Warwick, where she re- 
ceived the audience in general and the 
undergraduates in particular. The alum- 
nae, who may have had something to do 
with building up the Hepburn legend on 
the campus, felt quite justified as they 
saw her chatting with the students. 

And transposing all of this good feel- 
ing into the solid stone and brick of the 
Mrs. Otis Skinner Workshop, these 
same alumnae indulged in a moment of 
happy prophecy, seeing the Workshop 
lobby (will it have a lobby?) lined with 
the photographs of Bryn Mawr's stars 
and producers of stars, dominated by 
those two gifted ones — Theresa Helburn 
and Katharine Hepburn. 

Hortense Flexner King, 1907. 



cm 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 

BALLOT 

FOR ALUMNAE DIRECTOR 



Vote for One 




ELIZABETH LAWRENCE MENDELL, 
A.B. 1925 

New Haven, Conn. 

1922' 1924, Secretary and Treasurer of the 
Bryn Mawr Christian Association; 1923'1924, 
Class Secretary; 1925-1926, student at the 
American School in Rome; author of Illustrations 
of the Garrett and Modena Manuscripts of 
Marcanova; 1926-1927, Instructor in Fine Arts, 
Vassar College; 1927-1929, Instructor in Fine 
Arts at Barnard College; 1929-1930, student at 
the Sorbonne on a Carnegie Fellowship; 1935- 
1937, President of the New Haven Bryn Mawr 
Club; since then Councillor for District I. of the 
Bryn Mawr Alumnae Association; Candidate for 
the degree of Ph.D. in Mediaeval Studies at 
Yale; book now in preparation, Romanesque 
Churches of Saintonge. Married Dean Clarence 
Mendell; one daughter. 



MARY PARKER MILMINE, A.B. 1926 

Lakeville, Conn. 

1923-1924, Class President; Senior Class 
President; 1928-1933, Assistant to the Director 
of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; 1933-1934, 
Assistant to the Administrator of the Public 
Works Art Projects for New England; 193 5- 
1936, Administrator of Massachusetts Art Proj- 
ects under F. E. R. A.; 1934-1937, District 
Councillor for District I. of the Bryn Mawr 
Alumnae Association; at present Chairman of 
Salisbury Public Health Nursing Association; 
Chairman, local Birth Control League; member 
of Connecticut Council of Merit System Asso- 
ciation; Vice-President, Gordon Musical Associa- 
tion; President of the Ethel Walker School 
Alumnae Association. Married Mr. George P. 
Milmine; one daughter. 




[16] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 




HARRIET L. MOORE, A.B. 1932 

New York City 

Senior year, President of the Undergraduate 
Association, and European Fellow, graduating 
magna cum laude; after graduating, 193 2' 193 3, 
research worker at the Institute of Pacific Rela- 
tions; 1934-193?, London School of Economics; 
studied in the Soviet Union and did research 
work there for the Institute of Pacific Relations; 
193 5-1936, Institute of Pacific Relations in New 
York: sent by the Institute to the Soviet Union 
in this year and collaborated in the preparation 
of Problems of the Pacific, 1936; 1937, editing 
the publications of the American Russian Insti- 
tute; at present on the Central Scholarships Com- 
mittee of the Bryn Mawr Alumnae Association. 



Vote for One 



FOR COUNCILLOR OF DISTRICT V. 

ANGELA JOHNSTON BOYDEN, A.B. 1926 

Lake Forest, Illinois 



President of the Undergraduate Association in Senior year; 1928-1929, student of the 
American School of Classical Studies, Athens, Greece; 1929-1931, Director of the Junior League 
Theatre for children in Chicago; 1931-1933, Manager of Junior League Bookshop, Lake Forest, 
111.; at present, Director of Illinois Society for Mental Hygiene in Chicago; Director of the 
Lake Forest Y. W. C. A.; Chairman of the Alumnae Regional Scholarships Committee for 
District V. Married Mr. Willard Boyden; two children — one daughter, one son. 

ELLEN JAY GARRISON, 1921 

Madison, Wisconsin 

Primary Department of the Dalton School in New York for three years; 193 3, President of 
the Junior Division of the University League of the University of Wisconsin. Married Mr. Lloyd 
Garrison; three children — two daughters and one son. 



Vote for One 



FOR COUNCILLOR OF DISTRICT II. 

BEATRICE PITNEY LAMB, A.B. 1927 

New Canaan, Connecticut 



Graduated cum laude; President of the Christian Association; Assistant Editor of the 
College J^ews; 1927, studied at the Geneva School of International Studies; 1928-193 3, Depart- 
ment of International Co-operation of the National League of Women Voters; in this job wrote 
pamphlets, including The Economic Causes of War, The U. S. and the War Debts, The Problem 
of the Philippines, the League of Rations, etc. On the New York State League of Women 
Voters in 1931, and in 1934 on Board of the National League of Women Voters. Other Boards: 
New York Consumers League, the League of Nations Association, the Council of the Institute of 
Pacific Relations, Board of Trustees of the Penn School for Negroes. Now has withdrawn from 
most of these activities and is living in the country. Interested in photography, and in local 
community jobs. Married Mr. Horace Lamb; two daughters. 

[17] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 
WINIFRED WORCESTER STEVENSON, A.B. 1921 

Croton-on-Hudson, New York 

Vice-President of the Undergraduate Association, 1920; Vice-President of the Senior Class 
and President of the History Club; 1923-1926, Editor of the Junior League Magazine; 1932-1935, 
member of the Brearley School Alumnae Council; Trustee of the Hessian Hills School, Croton, 
New York; Governor of the Cosmopolitan Club, New York. Married Mr. Harvey Stevenson; 
two sons. 

J^lominated by the l^ominating Committee. 

Lois Kellogg Jessup, 1920, Chairman. 
Emily R. Cross, 1901. 
Rosa Mabon Davis, 1913. 
Serena Hand Savage, 1922. 
Margaret Collier, 1933. 

The dominating Committee has prepared the foregoing ballot, which is here presented for 
the consideration of the Association. According to the ByLaws, additional nominations for 
Alumnae Director may be made by petition signed by fifteen members of the Association {addi' 
tional nominations for Councillor may be made by petition signed by ten members of the Asso* 
ciation) with the written consent of the candidate, and filed with the Alumnae Secretary before 
May 1st. The ballot in final form will then he mailed to all members of the Association and the 
results announced at the Annual Meeting of the Association, to be held Saturday, June 3rd. 



IMPRESSIONS OF THE ALUMNAE COUNCIL 



TO convey in a brief space the 
kaleidoscopic impressions made on a 
person attending for the first time 
the meetings of the Alumnae Council is 
not an easy task. The three- day session 
in New Haven was dramatic to a new- 
comer, both in the volume of business 
dealt with and in the truly stimulating 
way in which it was presented. 

The value of the evident close rela- 
tionship which exists between the Alum- 
nae Association and the College was 
made real in the tremendously varied re' 
ports and in the informed and deeply in- 
teresting discussion of them by the Coun- 
cil. It is a tribute to the excellent or- 
ganisation of the business that there was 
never a dull moment the entire time — 
even though the executive sessions meet 
very stiff competition in the delightful 
and diverting hospitality arranged by our 
New Haven hostesses! 

The understanding and the experience 

[ 



which the members of the Council 
showed in the consideration of their own 
financial affairs, was only rivalled by their 
knowledge and perspective of College 
financial arrangements in which they are 
associated. Alumnae giving to Bryn 
Mawr has always seemed to me extraordi- 
narily fine, but nothing quite so thor- 
oughly impressed this on me as the state- 
ment that the College has already spent 
the promised gift for the current year, in 
the implicit faith that the Alumnae Fund 
will achieve its goal! 

This is a one-sided picture of one of 
the most many-sided gatherings I have 
ever attended. One should write equally 
enthusiastic encomiums about the versatile 
work of the District Councillors, the in- 
defatigable labours of the Scholarship 
Committee and so forth. It would all go 
to justify Miss Thomas' dictum, "Bryn 
Mawr women are wonderful." 

Barbara Cary, 1936. 



18] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



REPORT OF THE ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 
TO THE COUNCIL 

PRESENTED BY THE SENIOR DIRECTOR 



HAVING noticed several times in 
the accounts of the meetings of the 
Council that the report of the 
Alumnae Director was not printed with 
others in the Bulletin, I inquired the 
reason of the Editor. She replied with 
brutal frankness, "Because you Directors 
never say anything." Now, after exam- 
ining all the evidence, I meekly plead 
guilty on this count, but also submit to 
you, not as an excuse but as an excellent 
reason for our sins of omission, that there 
is hardly anything to tell which has not 
been told already. The fact is that in this 
age of publicity the Board of Directors is 
no exception to the rule. Everything said 
or done by it has been brought to light 
and given a thorough airing before it be- 
comes the turn of an Alumnae Director 
to speak officially. 

And when the same Director is un- 
fortunate enough to be asked to report at 
the Council in March and again at the 
annual meeting of the Association in 
June, she finds herself confronted by an 
added problem — so little can happen in 
those few intervening weeks that she 
feels like a poor housekeeper serving 
Sunday's roast warmed over at Monday 
dinner. She has great sympathy for the 
polite but inevitably bored group of loyal 
alumnae who are kind enough to listen 
to her. 

In an attempt to mitigate somewhat the 
tedium of this program for the audience, 
the custom might be established of draw- 
ing a sharp distinction in the nature of 
the respective contents of these reports. 
For the first occasion we could have a 
summary of the high lights in the business 
transacted by the Board of Directors 
during the year that has elapsed since the 



last meeting of the Council — a glorified 
species of the so-called "annual report" 
which every organisation has to endure. 
And it seems to me that this task might 
well be assigned to one of the newer 
Directors, thus injecting a note of variety 
and freshness of point of view into the 
proceeding. When the Association meets 
in June, the Senior Alumnae Director 
who will then be within a few months of 
completing her term of service, can con- 
centrate upon some particular aspect of 
the work of the Board during those five 
years, or give her general reactions to the 
experience as a whole, or enlarge upon 
some special topic suggested by it. 

But now we return once more to the 
Ides of March, and with all her yearning 
to be effective a Director can not hope to 
startle an audience of alumnae with any 
real news unless they happen to live far 
from Bryn Mawr and their copies of the 
Bulletin have become lost in the mail. 
Thanks to the seal and efficiency of our 
Editor and of her Board everything 
reportable is included in this periodical. 
President Park's talks to alumnae any- 
where are usually printed in full and 
through them and the President's Page, 
published regularly, the alumnae are kept 
in close touch with activities, plans and 
changes at College — most of these being 
subjects for discussion on the Board of 
Directors. In fact the President's speak- 
ing has an extraordinary range; in her 
speech at Alumnae Week-end last Octo- 
ber, she even went thoroughly into a com- 
parison of alumnae representation on the 
Boards of Directors of the various col- 
leges for women — a little seedling of this 
plant I had been nurturing with the hope 
of making it blossom for me in June, 1939 

19] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Then to those of us who are fortunate 
in living near enough to visit the campus, 
its altered appearance and new buildings 
tell more vividly than either the pages 
of the Bulletin or the report of an 
Alumnae Director can expect to do of 
much that has been sponsored by the 
Board of Directors under our two able, 
far-seeing, devoted and indefatigable 
chairmen — Mr. Rhoads, of the general 
Board, and Mr. Stokes, of the sub-com- 
mittee on Buildings and Grounds. The 
metamorphosis of Dalton which has been 
rejuvenated in every respect, except for 
the process of lifting its face, seems almost 
the greatest triumph. It has been a year 
when bricks and mortar have eclipsed 
in interest all other business and made 
participation in meetings of the Board 
of Directors and of the Buildings and 
Grounds Committee a truly thrilling ex- 
perience. At this point I might mention 
that the Board no longer meets in Phila- 
delphia, even occasionally. All meetings 
are held now at Bryn Mawr and are fol- 
lowed by dinner at the Deanery. This is 
a delightful function and gives an oppor- 
tunity to continue informally conversa- 
tion along lines that have been touched 
upon at the meeting. We feel, too, that 
bringing all the Board to the campus 
keeps them in closer touch with the Col- 
lege. 

The final arangements with the Sum- 
mer School were announced recently. In 
short, as I glance over the minutes of our 
(Board) meetings I find nothing of inter- 
est that is not already known to you. 

Finally, the February issue of the 
Bulletin carried an account of the 
December meeting of the Board which 
had been prepared by Dr. Mary Alden 
Morgan Lee and submitted to the other 
Alumnae Directors, President Park and 
Mr. Rhoads for their approval. This may 
be regarded as a typical sample of the 



quarterly meetings and reproducing it in 
detail was an outgrowth of a realisation 
that the alumnae in general would like a 
closer contact with the Board of Direc- 
tors and a conviction that the obvious 
and practicable method of effecting this 
was through their elected representatives 
on that Board and the Executive Board 
of the Alumnae Association. With this 
object in mind three informal conferences 
were arranged during the past year by 
the President of the Association. At two 
of these her Board and the Alumnae 
Directors came together at luncheon and 
for the third, to which she invited 
the Editor of the Bulletin, they met at 
tea in the Deanery. This last meeting 
had two immediate results — at least one 
matter in which the alumnae had a vital 
interest was brought up at the next Direc- 
tors 1 meeting by an Alumnae Director, 
and it was agreed that with the consent 
of the Board of Directors the experiment 
should be tried of publishing in the Bul- 
letin an informal account of each of 
their meetings. The alumnae will thus 
know as much as possible of the business 
which has been transacted and the plans 
for the future. If they are not sufficiently 
interested it will be simple to discontinue 
the practice. The two alumnae groups 
intend to meet from time to time for in- 
formal conferences. 

The date of a meeting of the Board of 
Directors is frequently announced in ad- 
vance by the Bulletin, and it is there- 
fore possible for individual alumnae or 
groups of alumnae to communicate with 
one or more of their representatives on 
that Board in regard to any business they 
wish brought up. I have one such letter 
on my desk now. We may not agree with 
your opinions and we cannot promise to 
produce results, but we will always be 
receptive and eager to be of service. 
Eleanor Little Aldrich, 1905. 



[WJ 






BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



DEANERY NOTES 



THE Deanery is once more in full 
swing with people coming out from 
town to stay during the entire 
spring, as well as many alumnae now in 
residence. The lectures have been as pop' 
ular as ever, with attendance increasing 
all the time. 

On February 9th, the Department 
of Social Economy presented Dr. Ruth 
Underhill. She spoke on "American 
Indian Poetry," an analysis of the form 
and content of poetry among different 
Indian groups. 

Sunday, February 19th, a most delight' 
ful musical afternoon was given by a 
String Quartet of which Helen Rice, 
1923, Warden of Rhoads Hall, is a mem- 
ber. We wish we could have more hours 
of chamber music of this nature. 

On Wednesday evening, March 1st, the 
Deanery gave one of its own parties, 
similar to that of last year. It met with 
even greater success and enthusiasm, and 
with a large attendance. After dinner, 
games were played, while the hit of the 
evening was a performance given by two 
magicians, Danny Mannix and Gardner 
Pearson, from Rosemont. They were 
clever and amusing, and faculty, under- 
graduates and alumnae enjoyed them 
equally. 

On Sunday afternoon, March 5th, Dr. 
Fritz Kurzweil, distinguished pianist, for- 
merly of Vienna, gave a delightful reci- 
tal, which was most enthusiastically re- 
ceived. 

In connection with this recital and the 



one on February 19th, the increasing need 
for a piano in the Deanery was again 
shown. The piano now in the Dorothy 
Vernon Room is not adequate for con- 
certs. Obviously, it is not practical to 
borrow one from Goodhart Hall each 
time we need it, as it is a great risk to 
the piano as well as being difficult and 
expensive. Up until now we have been 
renting a piano but cannot continue to 
do so, as it costs $14.00 to transport it 
to and from the Deanery for each occa- 
sion. If any alumna can give the Deanery 
a concert or parlour grand suitable for 
our purposes, it will be tremendously ap- 
preciated not only by us, but by all the 
alumnae and neighbors who attend the 
concerts. On the other hand, should any- 
one wish to lend us one, we will provide 
a good temporary home, with special care 
and attention, in addition to keeping it 
tuned, etc. This is a crying need for the 
Deanery, as the fact that we have no 
adequate piano actually prevents our ar- 
ranging recitals and music-lectures which 
everyone would enjoy to the full. 

On March 12th, the Department of 
Classical Archaeology presented Dr. 
Doro Levi, former Superintendent of 
Antiquities for Sardinia. Dr. Levi lec- 
tured on "Native Elements in Etruscan 
Art." 

On March 15th, the Annual Bridge 
Party for the benefit of the Eastern Penn- 
sylvania Regional Scholarships was held, 
followed by a tea. The whole affair went 
off beautifully with its usual success. 
D. G. F., 1932. 



JUNK COMMITTEE REVIVED FOR THE ALUMNAE 

The Bryn Mawr Camp (modern version of Bates House) needs clothing and 
books for boys and girls between the ages of four and nine. Do look over your 
children's stock of last summer's clothes and outgrown books and send all possible 
contributions to the Bryn Mawr League, Bryn Mawr College. 

[21] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 

HIGHLIGHTS OF THE DIRECTORS 1 MEETING 



THE regular meeting of the Board of 
Directors of Bryn Mawr College 
was held at the Deanery on the 
afternoon of March 16th with an attend- 
ance of twenty — Adelaide Neall and 
Eleanor Little Aldrich being the only 
Alumnae Directors able to be present. 
There was the usual routine of reports, 
announcements and business. The follow 
ing matters stand out as of greater interest 
than others: 

Resolutions were passed on the death 
of three friends of the College: 

(1) Henry Tatnall, for many years 
Trustee and Treasurer on the Board. 

(2) Professor Edmund B. Wilson, the 
eminent Biologist, who taught at Bryn 
Mawr from 1885 to 1891 and devised 
the course in General Biology, which is 
still in use there. 

(3) Mrs. Hilda Robins, who was 
Buyer for the College from 1922 to 1932, 
and since then the excellent Manager of 
Low Buildings. Her salary will be paid 
to her estate, which goes to her son, for 
the rest of the year. 

Among the appointments or changes 
of special interest, President Park men- 
tioned Dr. Gustav Hedlund's leaving to 
go to the University of Virginia as a 
great loss to the Department of Mathe- 
matics and the appointment of John 
Corning Oxtoby, A.B. and M.A. Uni- 
versity of California, as Assistant Pro- 
fessor to take his place. She spoke of 
Dr. Olga Leary as "the most admirable 
young woman physician I know," and 
said she had done splendid work during 
a year that had been made very difficult 
by much illness on the campus. Mr. Wil' 
loughby would like to include Miss Helen 
Rice, the Warden of Rhoads Hall, in the 
Music Department next year; Miss Gene- 
vieve Potter, Assistant in Mr. Hurst's 



office, has reached the retiring age after 
thirty-two years of service. The Board 
voted to continue her salary through the 
year. It is planned to invite a South 
American to give the Flexner Lectures 
on South American Literature. He would 
hold seminars in connection with the 
Spanish Department. President Park and 
Dr. Watson described plans for inaugu- 
rating joint teaching of the Sciences in 
1939-1940. She then told of changes in 
chapel service proposed by the under- 
graduates and approved by her. Instead 
of the short daily morning service and 
the four special assemblies of the year 
there is to be an hour set aside one day 
each month for the discussion of subjects 
of interest to the students and they them- 
selves may take part. This is the plan at 
Radcliffe. 

Miss Park reported on the College 
operation for 1938-1939 that every indi- 
cation points to completing the year with 
a small surplus. She feels that much of 
this successful issue is due to Mr. Frank 
Stokes, who has made a number of new 
long-time arrangements in improved ap- 
paratus. It seems to all the Board a re- 
markable achievement that with the extra 
heating of Wyndham, the Science Build- 
ing, the South Wing of Rhoads com- 
pletely and the North Wing partly, the 
increased cost of coal is only $600 in a 
total expenditure of $14,000. 

A tentative Budget for 1939-1940 was 
presented. It is hoped to admit more 
than twenty-five extra students for 
Rhoads Hall. The College is ready to 
take as many as it can get who are well 
prepared. The plant being there, each 
additional student's fee will reduce the 
deficit which, with falling income, is in- 
evitable unless the number of under- 
graduates can be increased. Miss Park 



U2] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



made a strong plea for bringing to Bryn 
Mawr more students who can pay their 
way. She said that the College was well 
supplied with the proper proportion of 
scholarship opportunities but that the 
revenue from paying students was not 
sufficient. She wishes the alumnae to feel 
a keen responsibility in this respect. The 
younger ones especially could go back to 
their schools and tell what Bryn Mawr 
has done for them. She talked also of the 
comparative charges at the other women's 
colleges. They all have a blanket fee. 
Vassar's is $1200, Smith and Wellesley 
have just increased theirs by $100, making 
them $1100. Ours is $1150 with a $200 
room, but runs up to $1500. It is on 
the more expensive rooms that we make 
our appreciable profit. 

The Treasurer's Report showed that 



one legacy of $1000 from an alumna, 
Mary Peabody Williamson, 1903, had 
been paid over since the last meeting and 
notice of another unrestricted bequest had 
just been received. The latter is $20,000 
from Amalia F. Morse, aunt of Linda 
Lange, 1903. This indicates that work 
put in on the subject of legacies is bear- 
ing fruit and proving very worth while. 

In the absence of Mr. Stokes, Mr. 
Rhoads reported for the Buildings and 
Grounds Committee that about ten bids 
for the Library Wing will soon be asked. 

The meeting adjourned at 9 o'clock, 
having enjoyed, during an intermission, 
as guests of Miss Park, one of the deli- 
cious dinners for which the Deanery is 
rapidly becoming famed. 

Presented for the Alumnae Directors 
by the Senior Alumnae Director. 



GIFT TO THE LIBRARY 



THE College Library has recently 
been enriched by two important 
works in the field of History of 
Art, both the very generous gift of Mrs. 
Albert E. Goodhart. 

The first is a catalogue raisonne of the 
paintings in the Philip Lehman Collec- 
tion in New York. This handsome volume 
contains excellent reproductions (one in 
color) of the best paintings of all periods 
to be found in the collection, though the 
majority are Italian of the thirteenth and 
fourteenth centuries. Accompanying each 
picture is a brief notice concerning the 
artist or school, a description of the pic- 
ture, and the relative bibliography. 

The second part of the gift is Part III. 
of Richard Oifner's Corpus of Florentine 



Painting. These five volumes, covering 
the fourteenth century, are the first to be 
published of a great series which will 
cover the entire field of Florentine paint- 
ing. The value of such a work for the 
study of Italian art is hard to overesti- 
mate. Not only does it supply an ex- 
haustive group of excellent reproductions, 
but it includes all the critical bibliography 
for each picture and a description of the 
condition of it as well as giving a brief 
stylistic summary of the work of the mas- 
ters concerned. When complete, this 
Corpus will be one of the key works in 
the field and each individual volume is in 
itself of great importance. 

J. C. Sloane, Jr., 
Associate Professor of History of Art. 



Helen S. Hoyt, 1897, has presented to the Bryn Mawr Library her own library 
of about seven hundred volumes, which she herself used in teaching English at the 
College, and which later were used by Miss Crandall. 

[2|J 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



UNDERGRADUATE NOTES 



IT IS a Bottom-the- Weaver complex 
we suffer, this conviction that we must 
personally support half the clubs and 
attend all the lectures that appear on 
the campus. In an embarrassment of 
riches; we have not learned to choose 
among Pyramus, the lion and Thisbe for 
our roles. That we go so far towards 
playing the entire cast and still produce 
our required yardage of academic weav- 
ing is remarkable. True, the German and 
French Clubs seem less active this season 
than previously, and the Theatre Work- 
shop is yet incomplete, but one need only 
visit Miss Park's office, trying to reserve 
a date for some further activity in the 
schedule of events, to see that it is not 
energy we lack. Our woman power per 
capita is fine, but we insist upon turn- 
ning as many wheels as colleges four 
times our si^e. 

Between Thanksgiving and mid-years 
the question was often raised whether 
these tempting functions could not have 
been scheduled for the first weeks of the 
new semester, where the pressure of work 
is less. Now that we have survived those 
very weeks it is clear that they, too, were 
already full. Since we argue that the pur- 
pose of these entertainments is to acquaint 
us with realms beyond our chosen spe- 
cialty, we are put to it to decide what to 
sacrifice. Each organisation has received 
further impetus from the freshmen who, 
surviving mid-years, were now entitled 
and eager to take part. 

The freshman show, The Devil Did 
Grin, was their first achievement. To re- 
vive the custom of maximum participa- 
tion, the authors wrote eighty-four speak- 
ing parts, for the largest class to date had 
come through with a minimum on proba- 
tion, fifteen out of a hundred and fifty- 



By ELLEN MATTESON, 1940 

three. Musical numbers were strung on a 
plot about the choice between heaven and 
hell as ultimate dwelling. Typical under' 
graduates were surprised in the midst of a 
typical smoking room session by the trum- 
pet of doom. This theme served as an ex- 
cuse for a gala parade of parody where a 
variety of campus figures, faculty and stu- 
dents appeared. Dean Manning was, of 
course, Saint Peter, checking the matricu- 
lation of hopeful applicants before the 
pearly gates. 

The tradition of warfare between soph- 
omores and freshmen was likewise re- 
vived, in the week before the show, in all 
its synthetic fury, although, to the gen- 
eral satisfaction, the ingenious plotting 
was in vain and the animal was preserved 
to the last. It was only appropriate that 
the animal, revealed to an audience that 
for the first time included legally invited 
men, should be itself a man. 

In the issue preceding the show the 
K[ews had campaigned for the admission 
of men, saying, "Down with misplaced 
modesty! This achievement of equal rights 
for men will be the glorious finale of our 
feminist drama." In this mock crusading 
spirit the editor escorted five tuxedoed 
gentlemen of the College to the best seats 
in the house while the audience cheered. 

Another man, the class animal, was 
rented from Western Union. After a pre- 
liminary misunderstanding by the officials 
of the request for a "young, handsome 
man" to spend the night on the campus, 
he was smuggled into Low Buildings and 
concealed for a day, at twenty-five cents 
an hour. This the "animal" raised to fifty 
cents after the show was over, and the 
freshmen, in the glow of triumph, could 
not refuse. He had eaten breakfast in bed 
for the first time in his life, he said, and 



[24] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 

had languished with a few old magazines, better. 11 

for the house was besieged by suspicious Most recent extracurricular sport is 

sophomores and no freshmen could pene' writing to the K[ews. One letter, deploy 

trate the lines to bring in supplies. ing radical elements on the campus, ap- 

The place of all extracurricular activi- peared to attack freedom of speech and 

ties is being subjected to serious scrutiny stirred up a flock of letters defining, at- 

at present. Comprehensives absorb the tacking and defending tolerance. One in' 

seniors now as the major offices change teresting point, implicit in the preliminary 

hands. The juniors wonder how com' letter, was that we have seemingly bound' 

prehensives will combine with a "semester less tolerance for dogmatism from the left 

of May Day, 11 and whether they can find while a conservative's opinion draws all 

an alternative to making it "bigger and our fire. 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 

Mondays and Wednesdays, April 3rd-24th, Thursday, April 25 
8.15 p.m., Music Room, Goodhart Hall 

Symposium on Art presented by the Department of History of Art. 

Speakers: Dr. Richard Bernheimer, Dr. Rhys Carpenter, Dr. Kurt Koffka, Dr. Milton Nahm. 

Tuesday, April 4th — 8.30 p.m., Music Room, Goodhart Hall 

Lecture, Carl A\eley's Africa, by Mrs. Carl Akeley, illustrated with motion pictures and slides. 

Tuesday, April I Ith — 8.30 p.m., Goodhart Hall 

All-Chopin piano recital by Josef Hofmann. 

Tickets: $2.50, $2.00 and $1.50 from the College Entertainment Committee, Taylor Hall 

and George T. Haly's (Weymann's) , 1613 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

Friday, April 14th— 8.20 p.m., Goodhart Hall 

Maids and Porters Play: Murder in Rehearsal by Austin Goetz. 
Tickets: On sale at door. 

Thursday, April 20th— 8.30 p.m., Goodhart Hall 

Reading of his poetry by Carl Sandburg. 

Sixth and final event in the College Entertainment Series. 

Tickets: $2.00, $1.75, $1.50 and $1.00 from the College Entertainment Committee, Taylor Hall. 

Sunday, April 23rd — 7.30 p.m., Music Room, Goodhart Hall 

Service to be conducted by the Reverend C. Leslie Glenn, Rector of Christ Church, 
Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

Friday and Saturday, April 28th and 29th— 8.20 p.m., Goodhart Hall 

The Gondoliers, by Gilbert and Sullivan, presented by the Glee Club. 

Tickets: Friday, $1.75, $1.50; Saturday, $2.00, $1.75. 

Sunday. April 30th — 4.30 p.m., Music Room, Goodhart Hall 

Song Recital by Susan Metcalfe Cassals. 
Reserved seats: $1.00. 

Sunday, April 30th — 7.30 p.m., Music Room, Goodhart Hall 

Service to be conducted by the Reverend John Crocker, Episcopal Student Chaplain, 
Princeton, New Jersey. 

[25] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



NEWS FROM THE DISTRICTS 



NEW YORK BRYN MAWR CLUB 

MISS MINOR WHITE LATHAM 
of Barnard College, formerly 
Non-Resident Lecturer in Play 
writing at Bryn Mawr, will speak at the 
supper meeting of the New York Bryn 
Mawr Club on Wednesday evening, 
April 12th. 

EASTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

On the Ides of March, the Regional 
Scholarship Committee held a bridge 
party at the Deanery to raise money for 
their fund. Both as a financial effort and 
as a delightful festivity, it succeeded. 

Louise Congdon Francis displayed beau' 
tiful Chinese embroidered linens, the sale 
of which added $90.00 to the Chinese 
Scholarship Fund. The large and efficient 
committee cleared about $300.00. On it, 
among others, were Ida Lauer Darrow; 
Hilda Canan Vauclain, who opened her 
house ten years ago for the first bridge 



party; Beatrice MacGeorge, and the 
super Chairman, Mary Crawford Dudley. 

WASHINGTON BRYN MAWR 
CLUB 

To quote the Washington Post for 
March 21st, 'The season's most brilliant 
audience welcomed Cornelia Otis Skinner 
in George Bernard Shaw's Candida last 
night at the National Theatre. The 
Bryn Mawr alumnae . . . had taken over 
the house for its annual benefit for the 
scholarship fund it maintains, and not only 
was the occasion a gala opening night, 
but the most successful such event ever 
sponsored by the Bryn Mawr group." 
Many dinner parties were given before 
the play, and all official Washington 
seems to have been in the audience. 
Margaret Scribner Grant, 1906, was 
Chairman for the sale of tickets, and 
Frances Carter, 1934, is Chairman of the 
Scholarship Committee. 



OF INTEREST TO THE ALUMNAE 



THE annual Bok award of $10,000, 
which is regarded as Philadelphia's 
Nobel Prise, has been presented to 
Dr. Rufus M. Jones and Clarence E. 
Pickett for "service best calculated to 
advance the best interests of the com' 
munity." In this case the community 
means the whole community of mankind. 



Elizabeth M. Mongan, 1931, edited the 
very beautiful catalogue for the great 
Blake collection, recently exhibited at the 
Philadelphia Museum of Art. Simply as 
a piece of book-making the catalogue was 
a beautiful and distinguished piece of 
work, and its content was as admirable 
as its form, 

I 



In announcing William Roy Smith's 
book, Rationalism and Reform in India, 
the Yale University Press says: 

"This comprehensive and objective study 
of politics and movements related thereto 
• in India will serve long as a standard ref' 
erence volume in its important field. The 
author, an expert in political history, has 
documented his findings from the best 
available sources, and verified them by 
firsthand observation. The studies of 
Gandhi, Nehru, and other Indian leaders 
who have come into prominence in con' 
nection with the social, educational, and 
other reforms, are full of human interest, 
and the objectivity of the book is amazing 
considering the tenseness and complica' 
tions of India's troubled stage." 

26] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



GRADUATE DAY 



"G 



RADUATE DAY, 11 the day in 
March which begins when Presi- 
dent Park announces the holders 
of the Graduate European Fellowships, 
awarded annually by the College for re' 
search and study abroad, and ends with 
a dinner in honour of the Fellows, was 
significant this year for two events. The 
day was not only an occasion in praise of 
scholarship and research, commemorated 
by an address given by Janet Howell 
Clark, A.B. Bryn Mawr 1910, later 
holder of the Helen Schaeffer Huff Me- 
morial Research Fellowship, and now 
Dean of the Women's College of the 
University of Rochester, on Women in 
Research, but was also the occasion 
selected for the inauguration of the first 
of assemblies of the entire College to re- 
place the more frequent and briefer 
chapels. 

The College, assembled in Goodhart 
Hall on March 17th, heard from Presi- 
dent Park that these formal meetings, "by 
request of the Student Council in behalf 
of the undergraduates and by vote of the 
faculty, will take place about once a 
month, will be set at different hours, 
never displacing the same class period 
twice, and will last for the hour. It is 
appropriate," President Park continued, 
"that the first assembly be given over to 
the interests of the Graduate School be- 
cause they are actually the interests of the 
entire College. 11 These interests place 



emphasis on "advanced and therefore in- 
dependent work, on virtues of accuracy, 
of facts, logical drawing of conclusions, 
recognition of the inter-relations of all 
knowledge." 

President Park announced the awards 
of three Travelling Fellowships, which, 
year by year, reward distinguished work. 
The Mary E. Garrett European Fellow- 
ship was given to Jean Hobworth, A.B. 
Bryn Mawr 1936 and M.A. 1937, who 
is at present Graduate Scholar in Mediae- 
val Studies. To Katherine Lever, M.A. 
Bryn Mawr 1937 and Graduate Scholar 
in Greek, the Fanny Bullock Workman 
Fellowship was awarded. Louise A. 
Dickey, A.B. Bryn Mawr 1937 and M.A. 
1938, won the Ella Riegel Scholarship in 
Classical Archaeology. She is working in 
England at present and will later study 
at the American School of Classical 
Studies in Athens, where she will con- 
tinue for the coming year. 

After the serious interest in scholarship 
in the morning the Fellowship Dinner, 
held this year in the festive atmosphere 
of Rhoads Hall, was an occasion for 
quips and song and general, light-hearted 
frivolity. Mrs. Manning, Mr. Herben 
and Mr. Nahm, and members of the 
Graduate Club, in inspired display of 
extra-curricular talents, provided amusing 
entertainment for the honored guests and 
their faculty and student colleagues. 
Vesta Sonne, 
Senior Resident in Radnor Hall. 



A LTHOUGH.Dr. Edmund B. Wilson left Bryn Mawr in 1891, his memory has 
xV. been kept green in the Biology Department, where General Biology still follows 
the plan he devised. His great book, The Cell in Development and Inheritance, has 
perhaps "influenced subsequent biological thought more than any book produced in 
this country. 11 The news of his death on March 3rd will be a grief to all who knew 
him in those early days at Bryn Mawr, not only because he was a great teacher and 
a great scientist, but because of the charm of his personality. Dr. Tennent represented 
the College at the services. 

[27] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



CLASS NOTES 



REUNION CLASSES 
1889, 1899, 1900, 1901, 1902, 1918, 1919, 1920, 1921, 1937, 1938 



DOCTORS OF PHILOSOPHY 
MASTERS OF ART 

FORMER GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Editor: Vesta M. Sonne 
Radnor Hall, 
Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Class Collector for Doctors of Philosophy: 
Marion R. Stoll 

Class Collector for Masters of Art and 
Graduate Students: 
Helen Lowengrund Jacoby 
(Mrs. George Jacoby) 

1889 

Class Editor: Sophia Weygandt Harris 
(Mrs. John McA. Harris) 
10? W. Walnut Lane, Germantown, Pa. 

Class Collector: Martha G. Thomas 

1889—1939 

Again 1889 is to be first; this time in cele- 
brating the first Bryn Mawr fiftieth Class Re 
union. It reminds us of the days when the 
sense of responsibility for inaugurating folk' 
ways for all succeeding generations of Bryn 
Mawrtyrs lay so heavy upon us! The local 
members of the Class are looking forward with 
enthusiasm to the Reunion and to the 
pleasure of entertaining in their homes those 
who come from a distance. In due course each 
of you will hear from some one of us but it 
does not seem possible to make definite ar- 
rangements as yet. Fourteen 1889ers have to 
date expressed their intention of being present 
on June 6th, including Emily Balch, the 
Blanchards, Margaret Thomas Carey, Helen 
Coale Crew, Alice Gould, Susan Franklin, 
Lina Lawrence. 

Here are extracts from some of the letters: 
lt I shall indeed try to get to our fiftieth! Doesn't 
it sound as if' we ought to be decrepit? Fm 
not, though I'll have to confess Fm not quite 
so limber as I used to be." l T am only a half' 
baked 1889er but I surely know enough to go 
to the luncheon on June 6th. " "Sister and I 
have just received your letter. If nothing pre 
vents we will be with you.'" "I have ten grand' 
children but I won't tell you any more of 
my secrets until I see you." "I am hoping to 
come on and have given up other trips to be 
able to enjoy this. To whom am I to send my 
Reunion gift?" The answer to the last ques' 
tion is that Patty Thomas is Class Collector. 

A. R. L. 



1890 

No Editor Appointed 

Class Collector: Elizabeth Harris Keiser 
(Mrs. Edward H. Keiser) 

1891 

No Editor Appointed 

Class Collector: Lilian Sampson Morgan 
(Mrs. T. H. Morgan) 

1892 

Class Editor and Class Collector: 

Edith Wetherill Ives (Mrs. F. M. Ives) 
28 East 70th Street, New York, N. Y. 

1893 

Class Editor: Susan Walker FitzGerald 
(Mrs. Richard Y. FitzGerald) 
7 Greenough Ave., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Class Collector: Elizabeth Nichols Moores 
(Mrs. Charles W. Moores) 

1894 
Class Editor and Class Collector: 
Abby Brayton Durfee 
(Mrs. Randall N. Durfee) 
19 Highland Ave., Fall River, Mass. 

189? 

Class Editor: Susan Fowler 

420 W. 118th St., New York City 

Class Collector: Elizabeth Bent Clark 
(Mrs. Herbert Lincoln Clark) 

1896 

Class Editor: Abigail Camp Dimon 

1411 Genesee St., Utica, New York 

Class Collector: Ruth Furness Porter 
(Mrs. James F. Porter) 

1897 

Class Editor: Friedrika Heyl 
104 Lake Shore Drive, East, 
Dunkirk, N. Y. 

Class Collector: Sue Avis Blake 

1898 

Class Editor: Edith Schoff Boericke 
(Mrs. John J. Boericke) 
333 Pembroke Road, Bala-Cynwyd, Pa. 

Class Collector: Elizabeth Nields Bancroft 
(Mrs. Wilfred Bancroft) 



[28] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



1899 

Class Editor: May Schoneman Sax 
(Mrs. Percival Sax) 
6429 Drexel Road, Overbrook 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Class Collector: Mary F. Hoyt 

Taking for granted that "Reunion, Bryn 
Mawr, June, 1939," has become your watch' 
word, we now ask you to make Pembroke 
West on Saturday, June 3rd, your objective 
or focal point. 

The letter from your Chairman has men- 
tioned high lights only. She and her com' 
mittee have pledged themselves to make June 
3rd, 4th and 5th memorable as well as enjoy 
able days, and they promise to provide enter' 
tainment, relaxation, and inspiration for every 
member of 1899. 

You will be sorry to learn that Ellen Kil- 
patrick is in the Memorial Hospital in Balti- 
more as the result of an accident. After she 
and Mary returned from Honolulu they de- 
cided to take a small apartment for a short 
time, as they intended to make an unusually 
early departure for Ogunquit, Maine. It was 
in this apartment that Ellen slipped on a rug 
and injured several vertebrae. Fortunately the 
surgeons say that a few months' rest in a plas- 
ter cast will effect a complete recovery. We 
hope there will be no setback and that she 
will be able to be with us in June. 

1900 

Class Editor and Class Collector: 
Louise Congdon Francis 
(Mrs. Richard S. Francis) 
414 Old Lancaster Road, Haverford, Pa. 

The Class will be grieved to hear of the 
death of Elisabeth Mary Perkins (Mrs. Eric 
Lyders), our European Fellow. She had been 
ill for many months but died peacefully in her 
sleep on February 26th. Her daughter Frances 
wrote from 131 Los Robles Drive, Burlingame, 
California. 

Don't forget that we have a Reunion in 
June. Come on Saturday, June 3rd, in time 
for the Annual Meeting of the Alumnae Asso' 
ciation. The Class Supper will be Saturday 
evening. Before our Class Supper we are in- 
vited to the Deanery Garden to see a Miracle 
Play by 1901. 

On Sunday there is a luncheon for all the 
alumnae and we shall have a private picnic on 
the campus in the evening. 

Monday noon we have a joint picnic with 
1899, 1901 and 1902 at Wyndham. 

Commencement will be on Wednesday, 
June 7th. Wyndham will be our headquarters. 



1901 

Class Editor and Class Collector: 
Beatrice MacGeorge 
Bettws'yCoed, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Corinne Sickel Farley died on February 27th 
after a brief illness which followed years of 
suffering from arthritis. We remember her 
distinguished work on The Lantern, transla- 
tions of Norse poems. Her love of poetry 
persisted; in 1937 she published a book of 
charming verses called Light, which was re- 
viewed in the Bulletin. We are grateful for 
our memories of her, and for the example of 
high fortitude which she left. To her only 
child, Clare, the Class sends its affectionate 
sympathy. 

1901 is arranging a superb Reunion. Head- 
quarters, Rhoads Hall. Pat Daly's morality 
play, The Fall of Man, in the Deanery Gar' 
dens, Saturday, June 3rd. Supper on the 
Deanery terrace. Costumes reminiscent of 
undergraduate days requested. Class meeting, 
Sunday morning, Fanny Sinclair Woods pre' 
siding. Croquet tournament Sunday afternoon; 
May Ayer Rousmaniere, Helen Converse 
Thorpe, Fan Ream Kemmerer in charge of 
prizes. High tea at Bettws-yCoed with Betty 
MacGeorge. Picnic with 1899, 1900 and 1902 
on Monday at Wyndham. 

For reservations and information, apply to 
the Class Editor. 

1902 

Class Editor: Elizabeth Chandlee Form an 
(Mrs. Horace Baker Forman, Jr.) 
Haverford, Pa. 

Class Collector: Marion Haines Emlen 
(Mrs. Samuel Emlen) 

This is our Reunion year, and we hope 
everybody will be there! Jean Crawford is 
Reunion Manager, and the events will begin 
June 3rd, with the Annual Alumnae Meeting, 
and end June 7th with Commencement. The 
Alumnae Luncheon will come June 4th, and 
the Baccalaureate that same evening. Details 
will reach you before long, but meanwhile, 
begin making resolutions not to miss our 
thirty-seventh anniversary. (Please communi- 
cate, if coming, with the Class Editor, as the 
Reunion Manager is, for the moment, absent 
in Florida.) 

Marion Haines Emlen's daughter, Marion, 
was married on February 25th to Charles Japy 
Hepburn, Jr., of Saint David's, Pennsylvania. 
Her attendants were two of her sisters, Cath- 
arine (Mrs. Philip Chapman) and Julia. Four 
of Marion Emlen's five lovely daughters are 
now married. Her youngest is away at school, 
but her son, Sam, lives at home. She is busy 



[29] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



making preparations for the bride and groom 
to spend two months with her at "Awbury." 

Virginia Willits Burton (Mrs. Norman G. 
Burton) writes from 31 East Twelfth Street, 
New York City: "I comply with your request 
to give some news of me and my family since 
November, 1930. It seems strange that your 
latest news of me should have been so shortly 
before Colonel Burton's death, which occurred 
quite suddenly in January, 1931. I have two 
sons: one is a lieutenant (junior grade) in the 
Navy, and the other is a graduate of Ursinus 
College, Pennsylvania, and wants to be a 
writer. 

"After my husband's death I lived two years 
in our Ardmore, Pennsylvania, home before I 
could dispose of it. Then I moved to Wash- 
ington where my two sisters (both married in 
the Navy) live. I stayed there for a year and 
a half, and then came to New York City, 
where I still am. 

"Your invitation to come to the next Re 
union of 1902 is very alluring indeed. I shall 
really greatly enjoy meeting the Class again. 1 '' 

From gay Claris Crane comes the following: 
"Now I find myself with a lifted eyebrow 
when I tell you that about the end of March 
Helen Bond Crane, 1909, Ludmila Slingluff 
and C. I. C. hope to open at 'Edge o' Pines' 
a tea room for the delectation of our friends 
and their friends. Call Towson 480 and see 
what we can do for you, if you are anywhere 
near Baltimore!" 

1902 (as well as 1931) will be interested 
to learn of the baby, Elisabeth McKenrick, 
daughter of Elisabeth Howson McKenrick 
(Bryn Mawr 1931), born January 8, 1939. 
Grandmotherly congratulations are in order to 
May Yeatts Howson! She now has three 
grandchildren, her second, Charles Henry 
Howson, III., son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
H. Howson, Jr., born last July. 

1903 

Class Editor: Mabel Harriet Norton 

540 W. California St., Pasadena, Calif. 

Class Collector: Caroline F. Wagner 

The Class sends warmest sympathy to Nan 
Kidder Wilson in the loss of her husband, the 
famous scientist, Edmund B. Wilson. Doctor 
Wilson was linked with the early days of 
Bryn Mawr. He was one of that outstanding 
group of young professors destined to take so 
eminent a place in their respective lines of 
endeavor. Many members of the Class had 
the pleasure and privilege of knowing Doctor 
Wilson and will realize the more keenly the 
loss which has come to Nan and to our Class 
Baby, Nancy Wilson Lobb. 



1904 

Class Editor: Emma O. Thompson 

320 South 42nd St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Class Collector: Isabel M. Peters 

Alice Boring writes less philosophically at 
the end of her second year in occupied terri' 
tory than she did at the end of the first. She 
says, however, of Yenching, "As a university 
we are still going strong, teaching 942 stu- 
dents," and had to turn away others that there 
was not room for. Of the future she tries not 
to think; the uncertainty is too heart-breaking, 
in spite of the fact that Yenching has some- 
how managed the impossible and maintained 
its essential freedom, and is "a sort of oasis in 
the midst of this occupied territory." 

1905 

Class Editor: Eleanor Little Aldrich 
(Mrs. Talbot Aldrich) 
59 Mount Vernon St., Boston, Mass. 

Class Collector: 

Margaret Nichols Hardenbergh 
(Mrs. Clarence M. Hardenbergh) 

Anne Greene Bates announces the marriage 
of her daughter— but that is 1936 news. 

1906 

Class Editor: Louise Cruice Sturdevant 
(Mrs. Edward W. Sturdevant) 
3006 P St., Washington, D. C. 

Class Collector: 

Elizabeth Harrington Brooks 
(Mrs. Arthur S. Brooks) 

Marjorie Rawson left the end of February 
to spend the spring in Tucson, Arizona, and 
California. She hopes to visit the San Fran- 
cisco Fair before returning to Cincinnati in 
April. Their Long Island house lost its roof 
and some of its windows in the hurricane, but 
they expect to have it sufficiently repaired to 
shelter them next summer. Their trees, alas! 
are not so easily replaced. 

Helen Sandison, with Lily Taylor of the 
Bryn Mawr Latin Department, sailed the 
Aegean in the summer of 1938, Scyros, Samo- 
thrace, Rhodes, Cyprus, etc., then went to 
Istanbul, and inland to Troy, Ephesus, Sardis, 
and many other places. The names alone are 
an enchantment. 

And, the most exciting for the last, a long 
letter from "White Esther," Lady Rigg, of 
New Zealand. 

"The only thing of note this year was 
Theo's investiture. ... I went over to Wel- 
lington for it and tried to look as if I were 
used to shaking hands with lords and vis- 
countesses — but really shaking in my shoes. 



[30] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



The ceremony isn't so grand as in England, 
that is, the surroundings are not so grand, 
the ritual is exactly the same and very inter' 
esting and picturesque. ... I am terribly 
thrilled that it was given to Theo for his work 
as Director of the Cawthorn Institute, but I 
sometimes privately wish that it was a thing 
to be put on and taken off as the occasion 
warranted, like your best hat. 

"My two daughters are flourishing. Esther 
Mary has just finished her matriculation exam' 
inations. Helen has finished Standard II. at 
the top of her class. 

"I spend a large part of my time doing 
housework. At present almost no one can find 
a servant for love nor money. We are suffering 
from the Labour Government's policy of fixing 
wages so high that nobody can compete with 
factories and shops. Life out here has its 
absurd aspects. We all scurry around, sweep 
and dust, and wash dishes, then tear out in 
our best clothes looking as if we didn't know 
one end of a broom from another, then rush 
home, pull off our best clothes, sling on others 
and madly get the dinner, hoping our hus' 
bands won't be home before everything's 
cooked. And the arranging it takes to get in 
golf in the winter and tennis even once a 
week in summer, I think, would move any of 
you to tears. However, I'm quite hardened 
now and can scurry with the best of them." 

1907 

Class Editor and Class Collector: 
Alice M. Hawkins 
Low Buildings, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

The Class extends its warmest and deepest 
sympathy to Eunice Schenck, whose mother 
died on February 19th after a brief illness. 
Mrs. Schenck had been an invalid for several 
years, and her resistance could not hold out 
against a sharp attack of grippe. Those of us 
who had the privilege of knowing her will 
always remember her keen interest in every 
thing connected with 1907, her enthusiasms 
about our successes, her kindly excuses for our 
failures, and her patience with our mediocrity. 
We have lost a good friend, whose faith in us 
never wavered. 

We are glad to be able to report on a few 
classmates who have been too long among the 
missing. 

Margaret Blodgett has just returned from 
spending six weeks with a friend in Italy, 
France and England, and is now home again 
in Cambridge, continuing her work for Miss 
Alice Stone Blackwell. 

Jeannette Klauder Spencer's second daugh- 
ter is preparing for college in Boston, and 
hopes to enter Bryn Mawr next fall. Jeannette 



herself still seems to be wandering around. 
Please watch all horse shows, and report if 
she is seen. 

A well documented rumor tells us that Elsie 
Wallace Moore, who has been lost to sight 
for years, is now living in Tokyo. Her dauglv 
ter is said to have a job on the Japan Adver- 
tiser, published there. How many people re- 
member the excitement at our tenth Reunion 
over Elsie's account of child diet and training? 
Evidently the banana idea was all right. 

1908 

Class Editor: Mary Kinsley Best 
(Mrs. William Henry Best) 
1198 Bushwick Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Class Collector: Eleanor Rambo 

The Class mourns with Margaret Franklin 
the recent death of her father. 

Tracy Mygatt is vociferous in season and 
out of season on the subject of peace and 
international conciliation. As secretary of the 
Women's Peace Union her written comments 
on the subject have been incorporated into the 
Congressional Record by Senator Frazier when 
he re-introduced the Independent Rearmament 
Amendment. 

Frances Witherspoon (F. M. to us!) has 
secured from Coward McCann the dramatic 
rights to Jean Mackenzie's novel about Africa, 
called The Traders Wife, and is working on 
the play. 

Meanwhile both Tracy and F. M. are tensely 
awaiting the final casting of their play about 
Vincent Van Gogh, which has been in the 
producers' hands for a long and anxious year. 

Lucy Carner has taken several flying trips 
from Chicago to New York. Last summer she 
visited Tracy and F. M. at their summer place 
in Croton Falls, New York, and in January 
she attended a conference of the Group Social 
Workers in Manhattan. But Lucy always re- 
turns contentedly to Chicago. 

According to Emily Fox Cheston, Margaret 
Copeland Blatchford and family have moved 
bag and baggage from Hubbard Woods to 
Michigan but we have not the new address. 

Virginia Claiborne's husband has recently 
been appointed Regional Administrator in 
Porto Rico for the Wages and Hours Law. 

1909 

Class Editor: Anna Elizabeth Harlan 
357 Chestnut St., Coatesville, Pa. 

Class Collector: Evelyn Holt Lowry 
(Mrs. Holt Lowry) 

To Lacy Van Wagenen we are indebted for 
a newspaper clipping which conveys tragic 
news. The date is February 4th: "Miss Leona 






[31] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Labold, 51 years old, of Portsmouth, Ohio, 
was found dead yesterday in a villa she had 
taken at Saint Paul de Venice, near Nice. 
She arrived on the Riviera January 10th 
aboard the liner Aquitania and took the villa 
January 25th." She had taken her life by her 
own hand. Perhaps some one can tell us if 
she had been in ill health. 

Lacy writes further: "I have been nursing 
my mother, who is 86. That is why I am 
living in America. 

"I see Mary Holliday Mitchell often in spite 
of her life of accomplishment which makes 
La Guardia's look like a rest cure. Along with 
her husband's social health work on a large 
scale, she is Secretary of the Board of Rudolf 
Steiner School here. But she manages to come 
to me weekly for a study group as well. . . . 
There was an opening tea at the new Bryn 
Mawr Club here before Christmas but we 
haven't this year arranged any 1909 gathering. " 

Helen Crane sent this bit about Mary Good' 
win Starrs' departure for China, January 27th. 
"They took — among other things — 11,800 
grains of quinine. Malaria is bad in South 
China and quinine is now thirty cents a 
grain — when it can be obtained at all; one of 
the inevitable byproducts of even an unde- 
clared war.'" 

1910 

Class Editor: Izette Taber de Forest 
(Mrs. Alfred V. de Forest) 
88 Appleton St., Cambridge, Mass. 

Class Collector: Frances Hearne Brown 
(Mrs. Robert B. Brown) 

Rosalind Romeyn Everdell's good Repub- 
lican spirit shows its head in her note to 1910. 
Ros writes: "As for me, about the same re 
port, housewife, but I like it. As my three 
children are no longer in need of mothering, 
I suppose I should be doing something big in 
the outside-the-home world! Maybe I will feel 
more like it in 1940. That seems to be the 
general answer! Isn't Madeleine wonderful! 
Love to 1910!" 

In January Elsa Denison Jameson received 
the degree of Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) from 
Columbia University. Her dissertation, entitled 
"Fantasy in Early Childhood," was concerned 
with the emotional and imaginative develop- 
ment of the child from birth to six years. 
This study brought together those findings 
from the fields of child development research 
and psychoanalysis which give a deeper under- 
standing of the subjective experiences of chil- 
dren during this period of life. In October 
of last year, Elsa was made a member of the 
Board of Directors of the National Recreation 



Association. Certainly she deserves the hearty 
congratulations of 1910 for the serious study 
and effort which she has so successfully brought 
to fruition! 

Elsa also sends us news of Edith Greeley 
Dewey, with whom she recently lunched in 
New York. Edith is occupied caring for her 
family and large house. She and her husband 
are at present chiefly concerned with labour 
problems. 

And so 1910 shows its political and socio- 
logical versatility, ranging in interests from 
the Grand Old Party to the World of Labour! 

1911 

Class Editor: Elizabeth Taylor Russell 
(Mrs. John F. Russell, Jr.) 
1085 Park Ave., New York City 

Class Collector: Anna Stearns 

Helen Parkhurst sailed on the Queen Mary 
on February 25th for a "flying trip" around 
the world. With the exception of the two 
oceans most of the trip will be by air and 
H. P.'s biggest problem was that of baggage. 
She is allowed only forty-four pounds for 
clothes, medicines and photographic supplies. 
Her itinerary is roughly as follows: Marseilles 
to Alexandria via Naples and Athens, with a 
peek at the Pyramids and Cairo. Then on by 
air to Baghdad, Besra, to Jodhpur, with a stop 
in Agra and the Taj Mahal, by air again to 
Bangkok, Allahabad, Calcutta, Rangoon, Ang- 
kar, Java and Bali. From Bali she sails to 
Sumatra and Hongkong. Then she flies to 
Honolulu and returns to Los Angeles, arriving 
about May 1st. But this is only half the trip, 
for after a few days in Pasadena, she flies to 
Mexico City, Yucatan, Guatemala, the ruined 
cities of the high Andes and then returns by 
boat to New York in July. 

Kate Chambers Seelye has been in New 
York recently and reports that her Christmas 
motor trip in the South was most enjoyable. 
She enjoyed especially seeing Beulah Mitchell 
Hailey and Margaret Hobart Myers in Ten- 
nessee. 

Virginia Jones writes from her home in 
North East, Pennsylvania, that she is still hop- 
ing 1911 will drop in to see her if they are 
motoring across the country. She is on Route 
5 on Lake Erie, near the city of Erie. A warm 
welcome awaits us all. Virginia has had trips 
to Florida, Pittsburgh and Washington this 
winter. Her nephew is a senior at Annapolis. 

Phyllis Rice McKnight has written an inter- 
esting letter about her new home in Tarentum, 
Pennsylvania, near Pittsburgh. Her address is 
1141 Park Street. She says: "This is a strange 
little mill town of about nine thousand inhabi- 



[32] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



tants, perched on the banks of the Allegheny 
River, twenty-three miles from Pittsburgh. 
The region fascinates the newcomer, with its 
coal mines tunnelling every mountain, their 
piles of slack burning outside the entrance, its 
great factories and foundries and power plants 
lining the river banks; its shabby houses, its 
historic background of struggle with the 
French and Indians. Our house is ugly but it 
has a glorious location on a hill overlooking a 
deep valley and green wooded hills. . . . The 
railway trestle of the Allegheny coal mine cuts 
across the valley in a manner characteristic of 
the country and each morning, while it is still 
dark, we hear the 'empties' 1 going over the 
trestle with the day shift on board. 11 

1912 

Class Editor: Margaret Thackray Weems 

(Mrs. Philip Weems) 

9 Southgate Ave., Annapolis, Md. 
Class Collector: Mary Peirce 

1913 

Class Editor: Lucile Shadburn Yow 

(Mrs. Jones Yow) 

385 Lancaster Ave., Haverford, Pa. 
Class Collector: Helen Evans Lewis 

(Mrs. Robert M. Lewis) 

1914 

Class Editor: Evelyn Shaw McCutcheon 
(Mrs. John T. McCutcheon) 
2450 Lakeview Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Class Collector: Mary Christine Smith 

We record with real sorrow the sudden 
death on March 5th of Dushane Penniman, 
beloved husband of Christine Brown Penni- 
man. Every member of 1914 extends to Chris- 
tine her deepest sympathy, and those of us 
who knew Dushane share her feeling of per- 
sonal loss as well as her happiness in having 
known him. 

Mary Coolidge has been spending the first 
part of her sabbatical year away from Wel- 
lesley, in New York, where she has attended 
lectures at Columbia and has played around 
with a great many friends. Now — if family 
health permits — she is proceeding, believe it 
or not, to the French Riviera. 

Evelyn Shaw McCutcheon and family, plus 
four Harvard seniors, adjourned to the Mc- 
Cutcheon's "Treasure Island" near Nassau 
early in February. Evelyn's youngest son was 
ill in the hospital there but there were all sorts 
of parties for the young people, so even a far- 
away island can be hectic. The boys have left 
now and Evelyn expects Laura Delano Hough- 



teling and Helen Shaw Crosby to spend a 
week with her in March. 

E. B. S. 
1915 

Class Editor: Margaret L. Free Stone 
(Mrs. James Austin Stone) 
3039 44th St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Class Collector: Mildred Jacobs Coward 
(Mrs. Jacobs Coward) 

Adie Kenyon Franklin's daughter, Frieda, is 
rooming in Pembroke East, a few doors from 
Catherine Head Coleman's daughter. Catherine 
came on to Bryn Mawr from her home in 
Wisconsin for a week in October but wouldn't 
stay for Lantern Night because she wanted to 
get back home in time to go hunting with her 
husband. 

Elizabeth Bailey Gross's daughter unfortu- 
nately began her freshman year at Bryn Mawr 
in the infirmary following an operation for 
appendicitis. Judith Boyer Sprenger, Frances 
Boyer's niece, is also a freshman, winning a 
scholarship with a very brilliant record. 

Ruth Hubbard spent two months in Ger- 
many and Austria last summer as one of the 
leaders of an "Experiment in International 
Living" group organised by Donald Watt, of 
Putney, Vermont. The group, twelve in num- 
ber and all college students or recent gradu- 
ates, spent five weeks in Munich and then 
went to the SaUkammergut. There they heard 
about fifteen operas, had lessons in German 
each morning and lectures by a young German 
orchestra director on the texts, music, etc., of 
these same operas. At the end of the two 
months Ruth had some time to herself and 
visited a number of German friends, arriving 
home just a week before the new crop of 
German exchange students arrived. (Ruth is 
still with the Institute of International Educa- 
tion and at present has a great deal to do 
with refugee students and others who have 
had to leave Germany — not an easy task!) 

Helen Everett Meiklejohn is to be a resident 
leader at the Summer Institute for Social 
Progress at Wellesley, July 8-22. She will 
lead the round table discussion on "Propa- 
ganda Analysis." The announcement says of 
Helen: She "is a teacher in the San Francisco 
School of Social Studies who formerly taught 
economics at Vassar College. She has been 
on the staff of the Research Department of 
the Social Security Board. Author of The 
British Coal Dilemma and The Dress Industry.'''' 
A clipping from the New York Times of De- 
cember 16th, sent me by Ruth Hubbard, says 
that Helen's husband, Dr. Alexander Meikle- 
john, is to join the Dartmouth faculty second 
semester as visiting professor of philosophy. 
In addition to a course entitled "Idealism and 



[33] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Pragmatism," Dr. Meiklejohn will give a series 
of public lectures on the philosophy of educa- 
tion, under the auspices of the Department of 
Philosophy of Dartmouth. Since 193 3 Dr. 
Meiklejohn has divided his teaching between 
the Experimental College of the University of 
Wisconsin, where he is Chairman and Profes- 
sor of Philosophy, and the School of Social 
Studies in San Francisco, where he is a mem- 
ber of the faculty. 

Two other clippings from the Times, also 
sent by Ruth Hubbard, tell something of the 
activities of Laura Branson Linville and Susan 
Brandeis Gilbert. Laura is active in the New 
York branch of the Women's International 
League for Peace and Freedom, and in addi- 
tion to being Chairman of the Education Com' 
mittee, she has been put in charge of a new 
committee to study anti-Semitic trends as part 
of the League's nation-wide campaign to com- 
bat intolerance toward all minorities through 
education. Susan presided over an all-day 
session of the Business and Professional 
Women's Conference of Hadassah, held in 
New York on February 5th. Four hundred 
delegates attended, from business and the legal, 
teaching and artistic professions. This group 
is engaged in a constructive program of social 
and cultural rehabilitation for the Jewish 
people, and at the conference a new adult 
study course was introduced, providing mate- 
rial on the social and political forces now 
affecting Jewish life. 

1916 

Class Editor: Catherine S. Godley 
2873 Observatory Ave., Hyde Park 
Cincinnati, Ohio 

Class Collector: Helen Robertson 

Constance Kellen Branham has just written 
that we will have our twenty-fifth Reunion in 
1942 instead of 1941, as previously scheduled. 
She has just completed this arrangement which 
will put us in Pern West, probably with 1914. 
The announcement may seem a little premature 
but those who were at Reunion last year will 
remember how much this change was desired. 
Con's work at Derby Academy has grown until 
she is now full-time dietitian. She says the 
school was founded in 1731 and is still going 
strong. It is a country day school and as all 
the pupils in the upper school stay to lunch, 
there are 105 hungry mouths to be fed. 

Freda Kellogg Jouett's husband has been 
made President of the Aeronautical Chamber 
of Commerce of America with headquarters in 
Washington. Freda moved her family from 
Hagerstown to Washington in February and 
her address is now 3 524 Edmunds Street, 
N. W. 



1917 

Class Editor: Bertha C. Greenough 

203 Blackstone Blvd., Providence, R. I. 

Class Collector: Dorothy Shipley White 
(Mrs. Thomas Raeburn White) 

Helen Harris sends the following informa- 
tion about herself: "Since July 1, 1938, I have 
been on leave of absence from Union Settle- 
ment. On that date I was appointed Director 
of the National Youth Administration for 
New York City. I'm still living at the Settle- 
ment." Helen gives her address as 237 East 
104th Street, New York City. 

1918 

Class Editor: 

Mary-Safford Mumford Hoogewerff 
(Mrs. Hiester Hoogewerff) 
179 Duke of Gloucester St. 
Annapolis, Md. 
Class Collector: Harriet Hobbs Haines 
(Mrs. W. Howard Haines) 

It is with great regret that we report the 
death last month of Rebecca G. Rhoads. She 
had been ill for some time and died at her 
home in Wilmington. The Class extends its 
sympathy to her family. 

Flash! In April, you will all get another 
bulletin from me with the last word about 
Reunion plans, but this "progress report" will 
bring you up to date in the meanwhile. 

Letters continue to reach me every few days 
from people who remember that I wrote them 
at that awkward moment just before Christmas. 
This is a big help, as it saves the necessity of 
my following them up. So far I have heard 
from thirty-two people out of a class of ninety- 
two, including the following members who 
get special thanks for their prompt replies: 
Alexander, Anderton, Atherton, Bacon, Bailey, 
Butterfield, Cassel, Chandler, Downs, Dufourcq, 
Evans, Garrigues, Gest, Hammer, Hart, Hodges, 
Huff, Kneeland, Loeb, Morton, Mumford, 
O'Connor, Pershing, Quimby, Ruth Rhoads, 
Schwarz, Scott, Stevenson, Strauss, Timpson, 
Walker and Whitcomb. 

Not all of them are sure of being able to 
come back, but most of them are planning to 
do so. I am glad to report that the Reunion 
Fund is coming on nicely, though we still need 
more contributions to take care of our obliga- 
tions. Please send them to me as soon as you 
can. Will everybody please check up, too, and 
send their lives to Mrs. Victor W. Knauth, 
Wilton, Connecticut, if they have not already 
done so? 

Three of our members are lost: Anna 
Booth, Dot Harris, Mary Senior Churchill. 
If anybody knows how to reach them, please 
send me word. 



[34] 






BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



This notice is just to whet your appetite; 
particulars of Reunion will be sent you later. 
Ruth Cheney Streeter. 

1919 
Class Editor: Frances Clarke Darling 
(Mrs. H. Maurice Darling) 
12 Lee Place, Bronxville, N. Y. 
Class Collector: 

Mary Thurman Martin, pro tern. 
(Mrs. Millard W. Martin) 
A twentieth Reunion, 1919! 
It comes this year, June 3rd to 7th, and 
regardless of your present habitat, we expect 
you there for the Class Supper, Saturday, 
June 3rd. We may all be in our dotage be 
fore the next one comes along, so make the 
supreme effort while you are still handsome 
and blooming. If we turn out en masse we 
may even convince the callow undergraduate 
that life really does begin at ■ — . 

Rockefeller is the place. The beds will be 
easier to take there than in most of the halls. 
At least we hope they will be. So throw aside 
all your earthly cares and cornel Mary Morris 
Ramsay Phelps will be Reunion Manager. 

Tip Thurman Martin. 
Dear 1919: Our only Tip has made me 
Reunion Manager again, so please all be won' 
derful and come back for our twentieth in 
June, everyone of you who possibly can. We 
weren't so bad at fifteen years out, having the 
largest number of any class reuning. Of course 
we did sing a song of 1920's, but they just 
thought that was typical. Heaven knows what 
we'll do this time, but it will probably be fun. 
Seriously, try to arrange your lives so that we 
can be there milling around in large quantities, 
and having an elegant time seeing everyone. 
I am so looking forward to greeting each 
familiar face. Lots of love. Buster. 

1920 

Class Editor: Teresa James Morris 
(Mrs. Edward K. Morris) 
4950 Hillbrook Lane, Washington, D. C. 

Class Collector: Josephine Herrick 

Extra special! Correction! Reunion takes 
place June 3rd. Headquarters: Pembroke East. 
Come and boast about your children! Come 
and learn about everyone's accomplishments! 
Come one, come all! It'll be fun! 

According to a Nashville visitor to Wash' 
ington, we should be proud of our classmates 
in that city. Martha Lindsey is a brilliant and 
successful newspaperwoman: Editor of the 
women's page of the Nashville Banner. 

Cornelia Keeble Ewing has two really beau' 
tiful little girls. The younger one was born 
last September and is named Emmie Elizabeth. 



Both Martha and Cornelia have been Junior 
League Presidents in the past. 

Miriam Brown Hibbits is now President of 
the Parent-Teachers Association, and I was 
told that the Class should congratulate Miriam 
on her work in this field. 

1921 

Class Editor: Elizabeth Cecil Scott 
(Mrs. Frederick R. Scott) 
1823 Park Avenue, Richmond, Virginia 

Class Collector: 

Katharine Walker Bradford 
(Mrs. Lindsay Bradford) 

We are reuning the first week-end in June. 
Do everyone try to come and make it a gala 
occasion. It's a good time of year to leave 
husbands in charge of offspring, and as it's a 
week-end party, those with jobs can be on 
hand for most of the festivities. 

Our headquarters are to be Pem West. Our 
Class Supper will be Saturday night, June 3rd, 
in Denbigh. 

Suggestions and ideas will be welcomed by 
Mag Taylor Macintosh, who still lives on Buck 
Lane, Haverford. 

1922 

Class Editor: Katherine Peek 

Rosemont College, Rosemont, Pa. 

Class Collector: 

Katherine Stiles Harrington 
(Mrs. Carroll Harrington) 

Grace Rhoads made a trip to England last 
summer in the interests of the Non-Partisan 
Spanish Child Feeding Mission. 

Missy Crosby is still on the Agora Dig in 
Athens. 

Alice Nicoll, who is still Director of Physi- 
cal Education at the Chapin School, has been 
running a girls' camp of her own at High- 
fields, Maine, for several seasons. Picoll's ad- 
dress is 118 East Ninety-third Street, New 
York. 

1923 

Class Editor: Isabelle Beaudrias Murray 
(Mrs. William D. Murray) 
284 N. Broadway, Yonkers, N. Y. 

Class Collector: Frances Matteson Rathbun 
(Mrs. Lawrance Rathbun) 

We are breaking our two months' silence 
with great good news. 

Nancy FitzGerald was married on February 
6th in Old St. Paul's Church, Eastchester, to 
Henry Donald Paramoure, of Mount Vernon, 
New York. Nancy has been at a library in 
Mount Vernon since she finished her librarian's 
course at Columbia last spring. Mr. Para- 



[35] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



moure is with the Johns-Manville Rockwood 
Insulation Company and does some contract' 
ing on the side. "He has four daughters and 
I have six dogs at the moment," writes Nancy. 
"None of the girls are at home now, but we 
plan to have the eight'year'old soon. Life is 
hectic but lots of fun." 

More good news — Louise Affelder Davidove 
has a new daughter, Marcia, born on October 
20, 1938. (This important announcement was 
very much delayed by our mistake, for which 
we are most regretful.) Marcia has a sister, 
Virginia, now four and one-half years old, a 
lawyer for a father, and an uncle (Louise's 
brother), who has just been appointed first 
cellist and assistant conductor to the Virginia' 
North Carolina Symphony Orchestra. 

We met Grace Drake Lenchini in New 
York with her tall young daughter. They 
were leaving the next day to spend February 
in Florida. 

1924 

Class Editor: Mary Emily Rodney Brinser 
(Mrs. Donald C. Brinser) 
85 Washington St., East Orange, N. J. 

Class Collector: Molly Angell McAlpin 
(Mrs. William R. McAlpin) 

1925 

Class Editor: Elizabeth Mallett Conger 
(Mrs. Frederic Conger) 
Dongan Hills, Staten Island, N. Y. 

Class Collector: Allegra Woodworth 

Frances Briggs Leuba reports: "We are 
living in Yellow Springs, Ohio, where my 
husband is Professor of Psychology at Antioch 
College (our ninth year). We have four chil' 
dren — three boys and one girl, all in school 
or nursery school. We have just moved into 
a new house built on two acres of land near 
college and are revelling in a house built 
around the family. The boys have a combina' 
tion gym and dormitory with built'in swing 
and trapeze, horizontal bar, double-deck beds, 
blackboard, etc., etc. — also a fireman's ladder 
to the workshop beneath their room. Other' 
wise it is a perfectly conventional house. I 
have a part'time job as assistant in the Fels 
Research Nursery School — very interesting. 
Clarence is using his part'sabbatical now to 
write a book at home. 

"We have bought about twenty acres of 
land in the foothills of the White Mountains 
and have so far built a oncroom living cabin 
and a bunk house. We have shore-line on a 
small lake and a nice mountain to look at. 
Thither we fly on commencement day as soon 
as we can pack up the cap and gown in moth 
balls for the next twelve months." 



And here is a letter from Crit Coney 
D'Arms, which we consider full of interesting 
facts: "I literally have no news for the BuL' 
letin — I can, for instance, tell you (a) all 
about how virtuous I feel over a paltry bit of 
preserving (Chet can testify to that) or (b) 
endless stories about my two most extraordi- 
nary little boys. For instance, Johnny distin- 
guished himself at one of these fancy nursery 
schools by defining the word 'puddle' as 'water 
to step in when you aren't watching out.' . . . 
We are crazy about Colorado. Nancy (Hough 
Smith) says I am more obnoxious than a Cali- 
fornian on the subject. Boulder is such a 
pleasant place in which to live that we stayed 
here all summer except for one week when 
we went up the Tetons — the finest scenery so 
far in my life." 

Editorial note: We consider these domestic 
sagas very exciting. To us career women who 
spend all our time commuting there is nothing 
so romantic as the kitchen stove. We buy 
tons of escape literature daily — Better Homes 
and Gardens, The American Home, Good 
Housekeeping — and we cut out miles of 
recipes. Incidentally, we tried asking one of 
our small sons the definition of puddle and 
he answered, "A puddle is a hole." "Is that 
all you can say about it?" I prodded. "Well," 
he replied belligerently, "It has to be a hole 
so it can fill up with water when it rains, 
doesn't it?" I don't think we can touch the 
D'Arms brightness. You might try it on your 
own three-year-olds. 

1926 

Class Editor: Janet C. Preston 
Kenwood, Catonsville, Md. 

Class Collector: Mary Tatnall Colby 
(Mrs. I. Gordon Colby) 

Mary Tatnall Colby has moved to the 
country and is "still in a fog" as an aftermath 
of moving. Her new address is Round Hill 
Road, Woodbridge, Connecticut. 

"We are trying to decide," says Tatty, 
"whether to raise a few chickens in the elegant 
chicken houses that came with the house." 
The Colbys have two children, James G., who 
is seven, and Ira Gordon, III. (called Terry, 
short for Tertius), who is about five. They 
are quite old enough, we expect, to vote for 
dogs instead of chickens — and young enough 
to want lions instead of dogs. 

Alan Fitts didn't want lions when we saw 
him — he was a lion, or maybe it was a bear. 
We didn't see his brother David, who is eight 
years old and stays at school till late in the 
afternoon, but we did see his mother. Mrs. 
Kenneth L. Fitts (Cookie to us) is now living 
at 6205 Mossway, Baltimore, and plays bad- 



[36] 






BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



minton with enthusiasm when she isn't driving 
the boys to or from school. 

Cookie reports that Tommy Rodgers Chub- 
buck has moved from Philadelphia to Bing- 
hamton, New York. We forgot to get her 
address — but that only means that we can 
make two notes grow where there might have 
been only one. 

1927 

Class Editor: Ruth Rickaby Darmstadt 
(Mrs. Louis J. Darmstadt) 
179 East 79th St., New York City 

Class Collector: Dorothy Irwin Headly 
(Mrs. John F. Headly) 

Agnes Pearce has saved the day by very 
generously answering a letter of mine inquir- 
ing about her work. She said: 

"I didn't fill in your questionnaire, though 
I kept it on hand for some time considering it, 
for I couldn't think of much to tell you. My 
work has been with the same organisation for 
the past nine years now. It's not China relief 
work, but something that's been going on since 
1914 or 1915 or so. We're called China 
Medical Board, Inc., and the main activity of 
the Board is supporting a medical school and 
hospital in Peiping, the Peiping Union Medi- 
cal College. 

"Our office acts as a sort of agency for the 
college and our activities are many and varied. 
We help appoint new staff members, take care 
of fellowships holders and their study pro- 
grams, act as a travel bureau, place scientific 
articles for publication, have a hand in the 
college's purchasing and shipping of supplies 
and equipment, do quite a bit in connection 
with finances and goodness knows how many 
smaller things, besides preparing material for 
periodic board meetings, writing up minutes 
and the like." 

Agnes, as you know, lives in New York 
and her office is in Rockefeller Center. She 
said that she attended the opening tea of the 
Bryn Mawr Club in its new quarters, the pent- 
house atop The Barclay at Forty-eighth Street 
and Lexington Avenue. I remember having 
to leave early so that is how I missed seeing 
her. I did see Nanette Chester Smith for a 
brief moment at that time. Nanette's husband 
was writing a book and Nanette expected to 
devote the winter to proofreading and taking 
care of the family. She has two children. 
Summers they spend on their farm in Northern 
Connecticut. 

1928 

Class Editor: Cornelia B. Rose, Jr. 

2333 South Nash Street, Arlington, Va. 
Class Collector: Mary Hopkinson Gibbon 



(Mrs. John H. Gibbon, Jr.) 



1929 

Class Editor: Juliet Garrett Munroe 

(Mrs. Henry Munroe) 

22 Willett St., Albany, N. Y. 
Class Collector: Nancy Woodward Budlong 

(Mrs. A. L. Budlong) 

1930 

Class Editor: Edith Grant Griffiths 
(Mrs. David Wood Griffiths) 
2010 Wolfe St., Little Rock, Arkansas 

Class Collector: Eleanor Smith Gaud 
(Mrs. Wm. Steen Gaud) 
Elisabeth Perkins Aldrich has a second son, 

born in Boston on February 13th. He is named 

David. 

1931 

Class Editor: Mary Oakford Slingluff 
(Mrs. Jesse Slingluff, Jr.) 
305 Northway, Guilford, Baltimore, Md. 

Class Collector: Lois Thurston 

This is Marion Turner pinch-hitting for our 
regular Editor, Mary Oakford Slingluff, whose 
eight-and-a-half-pound daughter, Mary Man- 
ness, was born on February 11th. 

Since no warning was given me that this 
column would be my responsibility this month, 
I have been able to glean very little news and 
will just have to tell you about the nice vaca- 
tion I had way back in September visiting 
Peggy Nuckols Bell and Kakine Thurber Mc- 
Laughlin. Peggy, her nice husband and two 
adorable children, have a new house in Slinger- 
lands, New York, and she is slowly but steadily 
regaining her health. At that time she was 
still staying in bed until 10 in the morning 
and going to bed at 10 at night with a nap 
in between: all very hard for a person with 
her energy. The children could not go to her 
room in the morning until she whistled for 
them and I can still hear three-year-old Car- 
olyn Sue coming steadily up the stairs, stop- 
ping on each step to call out, "Thistle, mom- 
mom, thistle." She is a blond-haired, dark- 
eyed witch, and little Doug is a handsome, 
serious youngster just starting school. 

Kakine, too, is in a new home, one designed 
by her architect-husband. It is beautifully sit- 
uated on a hill overlooking a wooded valley 
and gave promise of being charming when the 
newness wore off. Since I was there, they 
have achieved a lawn, she tells me — grass, 
flowers, etc.— have done some interior dec- 
orating and had a perfectly enormous house- 
warming. Meredith is the most grown-up 
three-year-old I ever saw, friendly, poised, and 
with her mother's head of soft curls. 

Elisabeth Livermore Forbes (1932) tells 



[37] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



me that she ran across Celia Darlington in 
Boston not long ago, looking very well and 
very stylish. I have seen people from every 
class except that of 1931 — and Fd surely like 
to see some of them. How about all of us 
writing to Mary Slingluff so that she will not 
have to neglect her home, husband and baby 
in the next few months running around in 
search of news about us! 

1932 

Class Editor: Margaret Woods Keith 
(Mrs. E. Gordon Keith) 
P. O. Box 208, Iowa City, Iowa 

Class Collector: Ellen Shaw Kesler 
(Mrs. Robert Wilson Kesler) 

Eleanor Renner de Laguna writes from her 
new home in Port Washington, Long Island 
(132 Murray Avenue): "People write us 
questioning the spelling of the baby's name 
and seem to think Wallace was agitated and 
hence at fault when he wrote it. It is Dian — 
nothing else — not Diane or Diana. She has 
finally topped six pounds, but in spite of her 
weight is twenty inches long — -which is some 
thing. Everyone says she is very pretty, and 
it is said usually with an unflattering air of 
surprise. 

"By the way — we have a house in Port 
Washington. It is large and comfortable — in 
fact, heavenly after Cambridge. The Port is 
suburban, with lawns, trees, flowers, water, and 
the airport for the Bermuda Clipper. Wallace 
teaches at Queens College, in Flushing. . . . 
We saw Janet and Parke (Dickey) at the 
G. S. A. meetings, but they talked geology!" 

And now, out of a complete void, comes a 
most welcome note from Dolly Davis. She is 
living at home in Elkridge, Maryland, and 
painting; and that, believe it or not, says she, 
is an all-year-round, full-time occupation! 

Lucille Shuttleworth Moss is living with her 
mother in Kew Gardens, Long Island (8344 
Lefferts Boulevard). Her husband, "Dode," 
expects to complete his interneship the first of 
July, and after that they expect to have him 
go into practjee with his father. 

We were distinctly amazed and delighted 
recently on attending a benefit amateur pre 
duction of The Importance of Being Earnest 
by the Riverdale China Relief Committee, to 
discover in the person of "Miss Prism" our 
former classmate, Alice Bemis (Mrs. Charles 
Thompson). How we recognized her under 
the formidable make-up and costuming re 
mains a mystery, but recognize her we did. 
After the play ended we discovered her behind 
an armful of flowers backstage, and learned 
that she is living near Spuyten Duyvil, at 3020 
Palisade Avenue, New York City. 



Janet Woods Dickey and her husband are 
located for the winter in Harrisburg, Pennsyl' 
vania, where Parke is working for the Penn' 
sylvania Geological Survey. They expect to 
return in the spring to Titusville, which serves 
as a headquarters for his summer field work. 
The other twin and her husband, Gordon 
Keith, are temporarily resident in New York 
City, but we do not know from one week to 
the next when we shall get our marching 
orders. At present it seems probable that we 
shall remain here until the 1st of July, and 
after that return to Cambridge, Massachusetts. 
This is, of course, subject to change without 
notice. Gordon is working for the National 
Bureau of Economic Research, and we are 
living at their "Riverdale Branch," a lovely 
old estate on the banks of the Hudson, just 
below the Yonkers-New York line. Our view 
encompasses the Hudson from Yonkers south 
to the George Washington Bridge. The slight 
disadvantages connected with going back and 
forth to Manhattan are more than balanced 
by the advantages of country air, scenery and 
sunshine. If it would only snow we could ski 
on our front lawn, and when warm weather 
comes we shall be able to bask in the sun on 
the edge of our private swimming pool. In 
the meantime we can enjoy ourselves with 
ping pong in the game room and shooting in 
the shooting gallery. It is almost too good 
to last! Another advantage is that we are in 
a section of New York remote from the 
World's Fair grounds, and so may hope for 
a comparatively peaceful spring and summer. 
Our address here is "Hillside," West Two 
Hundred and Fifty-fourth Street and Inde- 
pendence Avenue, New York City. 

In answer to several requests: To the best 
of our knowledge, Jo Graton Chase and her 
family are still living in Tucson, Arizona, at 
2422 East First Street. We would welcome 
more news of her, and of A. Lee Hardenbergh 
and her economist-husband, Lincoln Clark, 
who are living at 6053 Kenwood Avenue, 
Chicago, Illinois. 

1933 

Class Editor: Margaret Tyler Archer 
(Mrs. John S. B. Archer) 
St. Paul's School, Concord, N. H. 

Class Collector: Mabel Meehan Schlimme 
(Mrs. B. F. Schlimme, Jr.) 

1934 
Class Editor: Carmen Duany 

Hotel Ansonia, 74th and Broadway 
New York, N. Y. 
Class Collector: Katherine L. Fox 

Still a fourth name must be added to the 
December list of late arrivals. Constance 



[38] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Robinson Katholi's son, William, was born on 
December 16th. He now has a mind of his 
own and is getting himself spoiled in the bar' 
gain. His mother claims she likes him best 
asleep. 

Dorothy Kalbach Arnold has been working 
since July in a most interesting civil service 
job. She is interviewer with the Department 
of Public Assistance in Reading, Pennsylvania, 
a State Emergency Relief organization. 

Haviland Nelson, a wanderer long strayed 
out of our ken, very kindly answered an urgent 
plea with the following account of herself, hur' 
riedly sandwiched in between a report due 
and the Russian Ballet: "I am back at school: 
to be specific, I am attending the University 
of California, and having a fine time. I got 
my teacher's credentials last month, and I'm 
now working for my M.A. in Latin and 
Archaeology. Next year I hope either to go 
on and get the wretched degree, or to get a 
job. Unfortunately, the woods are full of 
Latin teachers, it seems, at the very moment 
when nobody wants to take Latin any more. 
An unfortunate situation. I am living in great 
domesticity with one electric plate and a 
-toaster, and I'm working my way through all 
the varieties of Campbell's soups. Some are 
quite good; I'm thinking of trying to turn an 
honest penny by giving them a testimonial. 
So far such honest pennies as I have turned 
have been by doing housework for the more 
flourishing matrons of Berkeley; I'm quite 
adept with all makes of vacuum cleaners these 
days, and I wield a wicked mop. However, 
such employment is not my ideal, but I'm 
hoping to find something a trifle more aca' 
demic one day soon." 

Elizabeth Mackenzie, her work at Cam' 
bridge completed, arrived at Cheltenham's 
Ladies' College recently to take up her new 
duties. The college is a large girls' public 
school with eight hundred girls and a staff of 
eighty. She writes: "This is a marvelous 
place. Evidently it's full of characters, in the 
college and out. There are some lovely insti' 
tutions here — for instance, it's not considered 
good for the girls to carry their bags of books 
from the houses to the college, so they're all 
collected by a top'hatted gentleman and an 
ancient hansonvcab and dumped out on the 
pavement and in at a side door every morn- 
ing before prayers." 

Maria Coxe's play about peace was pre 
duced by the Theatre League in Philadel' 
phia, and then aroused the interest of the 
National Service Bureau of the Federal 
Theatre, which had plans for producing it in 
various parts of the West and South, but dc 
manded drastic changes, and endless complica- 
tions followed. 



Since the above was written we have heard 
that the Federal Theatre of the South wants 
to do the peace play all over North Carolina 
with Community Drama Units under Federal 
Theatre directors. One project sounds in' 
triguing. It plans to do a version in Negro 
dialect with a Negro cast and two hundred 
spiritual singers as a musical background. 
Coxey had grand press notices, and another 
play of hers opens in May at the Hedgerow 
Theatre. 

1935 

Class Editors: Elizabeth Colie 

377 Vose Ave., South Orange, N. J. 

and 
Elizabeth Kent Tarshis 
(Mrs. Lorie Tarshis) 
65 Langdon St., Cambridge, Mass. 

Class Collector: Josephine E. Baker 

1936 

Class Editor: Barbara L. Cary 

Merion Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Assistant Editor: Elizabeth Bates Carrick 

(Mrs. Alan Carrick) 

129 East 55th St., New York, N. Y. 
Class Collector: Ellen Scattergood Zook 

(Mrs. W. H. Dunwoody Zook) 
Headline news this month is the wedding of 
one half of this editorial combination. On 
February 21st Betsy Bates was married to 
Mr. Alan L. Carrick, of New York City. The 
wedding was held in the Bates's home in Sum' 
mit, New Jersey, in the presence of the imme- 
diate families. Mr. Carrick is a graduate of 
Princeton University, Class of 1923, and prac- 
tices law in New York. After a wedding trip 
to Bermuda the Carricks will live in New 
York City. 

The Bates wedding was responsible for 
bringing Tony Brown to the East for a short 
visit. Tony was Betsy's only attendant at the 
wedding. She stopped in Philadelphia on Sat' 
urday, February 18th, visited College and had 
lunch with various available members of the 
Class at Bar Cary's. Tony reported that she 
and Ellie Cheney Parker in the near future are 
jointly addressing a group of Chicago pre 
college girls about life at Bryn Mawr. More 
power to them. 

Freshman Show brought us an unexpected 
and very pleasant chat with two other class' 
mates. Teddy Simons, full of her trip to the 
Near East doing photography last summer, and 
also very excited about "Tommy" Simpson's 
engagement! But I'm poaching on 193 5's ter' 
ritory, so I'll say no more of that. Betty 
Hemsath was also at the Show. She has a 
most interesting job doing personnel work 
with the Pennsylvania Company, one of the 



[39] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



large Philadelphia banks. Betty reports that 
Sally Todd has a job in Philadelphia at the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons, doing 
scientific library cataloguing. No one has seen 
her but Betty, and Esther Bassoe Williams had 
a luncheon date with her for the next day, 
so it sounds very authentic. 

Doreen Canaday continues to be as elusive 
as ever, despite the fact that she is now back 
in America. She spent part of the Christmas 
holidays in Providence attending the meetings 
of the archaeologists there. At the last minute 
she was fitted into the program and read a 
paper which everyone said was very good. 
1936 can now bathe in her reflected glory! 
More recently Do gave a lecture at the Toledo 
Art Museum. Latest reports indicate she 
plans to take an apartment in Cambridge and 
do some research at Radcliffe. 

1937 

Class Editor: Alice G. King 

61 East 86th St., New York City 

Class Collector: Sarah Ann Fultz 

It's time to start reminding you that we're 
having our second Reunion this year, June 
3rd to June 7th. We'll mention it to you 
again, but meanwhile here is what's happen' 
ing: the Annual Meeting of the Alumnae 
Association, Saturday the 3rd; Miss Park's 
breakfast and the Alumnae Luncheon Sunday 
the 4th, Baccalaureate Sunday evening; Com' 
mencement Wednesday, June 7th. 

Thirtythree stray wanderers are still loth 
to talk about themselves and we wish we 
could draw some news out of them. But for' 
tunately a few of those self'addressed postcards 
did turn up with our mail this month. 

El Smith is working in the advertising dc 
partment of Bonwit Teller in Philadelphia. 
She says she is uncertain what her position or 
title is, but it sounds pretty good to us anyway. 

Peggy Lippincott (Mrs. Alfred R. Sumner) 
is keeping house in Hewlett, Long Island, and 
working for her M.A. at Columbia. Their 
house in New Hampshire was blown away by 
the hurricane last fall, but they are planning 
to build again in June — bigger and better. 

Betty Hoyt (Mrs. John E. P. Conley, Jr.) 
tells us she is busy being a housewife, but with 
a newspaperman in the family there is never 
a dull moment. 

Pat O'Neill writes briefly that she is resum' 
ing where she left ofF several years ago. Yes, 
she was no more specific than that, so you'll 
have to see the Denbigh chain letter for 
details. 

Lisa Gratwick has certainly been travelling. 
Last summer she and her twin sister went 
abroad and after a cruise on the Mediter' 



ranean spent three months driving through 
Italy, Germany, Hungary, Jugoslavia, Bui' 
garia, and Turkey, where someone took an 
unsuccessful shot at them as they accidentally 
passed the border after dark. After that they 
went to Istanbul, Asia Minor, Rumania, 
Munich, Paris, London, Liverpool, and then 
home. At the moment Lisa is wedging in as 
much skiing as she can between learning to 
cook, studying wood carving, and keeping up 
with her German. 

Jean Flach tells us she is merely a lady of 
leisure, but we will take that with a grain of 
salt. 

Mary Lewis has a more original job in the 
educational field than any of us who are 
teaching. She says she is "at the Farm School 
coping not only with children but also goats, 
sheep, chickens, three dogs, one pony, one 
rabbit, some toads and lizards, and other things 
which live in aquariums." 

1938 

Class Editor: Alison Raymond 

114 E. 40th St., New York, N. Y. 

Class Collector: Dewilda E. Naramore 

It is hard to believe, but we are having a 
Reunion this spring. If you remember how 
you felt about them last year, you quail, but 
it seems different from the alumnae's view 
point! Helen Shepard, who was elected Re 
union Manager at our last Class meeting, is 
running it, and it will be a festive gathering. 
Activities extend from June 3rd to June 7th. 
It will be a chance to see everyone again, as 
well as to watch the Class of 1939 graduate. 
More detailed notes about it will appear in the 
next Bulletin, but keep June 3rd to 7th 
clear if possible. 

Mary Walker Earl, who was married on the 
21st of February, sailed for a three months' 
"business" trip with her husband last Satur- 
day. They will be travelling all over Europe, 
and will settle on their return near New York. 

Miggie Howson is living in New York and 
working on her novel. When last seen she 
had one chapter to go before finishing her 
first draft. 

Katherine Freeman Rafter has a daughter, 
Susan, who is several months old. We are 
sorry not to have known of it sooner. Kath' 
erine writes that Anne Marsh is doing every 
thing from dramatics to domesticity! 

Julia Grant has been studying at secretarial 
school, and is now in Florida for a two 
months' holiday, typewriter in hand. 

A plea from the Editor: Since I know no 
one will write about herself, will you send me 
news about your friends? It makes better, 
fuller news anyway! 



[401 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



IKECTGKY 



The Agnes Irwin School 

WYNNEWOOD, PENNA. 

Grades V to XII 

A College Preparatory 

School for Girls 

Kyneton School 

VILLA NOVA, PENNA. 
Pre-school and Grades I to IV 

BERTHA M. LAWS, A.B., Headmistress 



The Madeira School 

Greenway, Fairfax County, Virginia 

A resident and country day school 

for girls on the Potomac River 

near Washington, D. C. 

150 acres 10 fireproof buildings 

LUCY MADEIRA WING, Headmistress 



Wykeham Rise 

WASHINGTON, CONNECTICUT 
IN THE LITCHFIELD HILLS 

College Preparatory and General Courses 

Special Courses in Art and Music 

Riding, Basketball, and Outdoor Sports 

FANNY E. DAVIES, Headmistress 



Bryn Mawr College Inn Tea Room 

Luncheons 40c • 50c • 75c 

Dinners 85c • $1.25 

Meals a la carte and table d'hote. 

Daily and Sunday 8:30 A. M. to 7:30 P. M. 

AFTERNOON TEAS THE PUBLIC IS INVITED 

MISS SARA DAVIS. Mgr. Tel.: Bryn Mawr 386 



* Vacations From A to Z * 

First hand data on distinctive vacation places from 
roast to coast in this country, Bermuda and the 
West Indies. Transportation by land, sea and air. 
Cruises to Central and South America. Whenever 
and wherever you go, consult those who have been 

Vacation Advisers 
9 E. 46th St., New York, N. Y. Wlckersham 2-2730 

Naturally, no charge for service 



THE 

SHIPLEY SCHOOL 

BRYN MAWR, PENNSYLVANIA 

Preparatory to 

Bryn Mawr College 



ALICE G. HOWLAND 
ELEANOR O. BROWNELL 



? Principali 



The Ethel Walker School 

SIMSBURY, CONNECTICUT 

Head of School 

ETHEL WALKER SMITH, A.M. 

Bryn Mawr College 

Head Mistress 

CHARLOTTE WELLES SPEER, A.B. 
Vassar College 



Rosemary Hall 

Greenwich, Conn. 
COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

Constance Evers ) 

Eugenia Baker Jessup, B.A. , Headmistresses 
Bryn Mawr College ) 

Caroline Ruutz-Rees, Ph.D. 

Mary E. Lowndes, M.A., Litt.D. 



Advisers 



ABBOT ACADEMY 

ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 
Orer a century of achieYement as its heritage. 
Rich traditions combined with modern methods. 
Thorough college preparatory course; also gen- 
eral course with emphasis on the fine arts. 
Excellent equipment. Beautiful country campus 
twenty-three miles from Boston. All sports. 
MARGUERITE M. HEARSEY, Principal 



THE MARY <♦ WHEELER 
SCHOOL 

Excellent College Preparatory Record and General 
Cultural Course. Leisure for Hobbies. Modern In 
Spirit. Methods and Equipment. Daily Sports on 
170 acre Farm. Country Residence for Younger Girls. 
MARY HELENA DEY, M. A., Principal, Providence, R. I. 



Kindly mention Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletii 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



DIRECTORY 



I 



FERRY HALL 

Junior College: Two years of college work. 
Special courses in Music, Art and Dramatics. 

Preparatory Department: Prepares for 
colleges requiring entrance examinations, 
also, for certificating colleges and universities. 

General and Special Courses. 

Campus on Lake Front — Outdoor Sports — 
Indoor Swimming Pool — Riding 

For catalog address 

ELOISE R. TREMAIN 

LAKE FOREST ILLINOIS 



The Baldwin School 

BRYN MAWR, PENNSYLVANIA 

A Resident and Country Day School for Girls 

Ten Miles from Philadelphia 
Stone buildings, indoor swimming pool, sports. 
Thorough and modern preparation for all lead- 
ing colleges. Graduates now in over 40 colleges 
and Tocational schools. 

ELIZABETH FORREST JOHNSON 
HEAD OF THE SCHOOL 



The Katharine Branson School 

ROSS, CALIFORNIA 
Across the Bay from San Francisco 

A Country School College Preparatory 

Head: 
Katharine Fleming Branson, A.B., Bryn Mawr 



TOW-HEYWOOfj 

I J On theSound^AtShippan Point \ J 

ESTABLISHED 1865 

Preparatory to the Leading Colleges for Women. 
Also General Course. 

Art and Music. 

Separate Junior School. 

Outdoor Sports. 

One hour from iVen> York 

Address 

MARY ROGERS ROPER, Headmistress 

Box Y, Stamford, Conn. 



MISS BEARD'S 
SCHOOL 

Excellent Preparation for the 
Leading Colleges for Women 

General Courses with 
Elective* in Household Arts, 
Music, and Art 
Metropolitan opportunities in drama, 
art, and music. Country life and 
outdoor sports; hockey, basketball, 
lacrosse, tennis, archery, riding. 

Lucie C. Beard, Headmistress 
Box 84, Orange, Niew Jersey 




La Loma Feliz 

SANTA BARBARA, CALIFORNIA 

Residential School, Kindergarten through College 
Preparatory, for boys and girls who need especial 
attention or change of environment because of 
physical handicaps. No tuberculous or mentally 
retarded children can be received. 

INA M. RICHTER 

Medical Director and Head Mistress 

B.A. Bryn Mawr, M.D. Johns Hopkins 



A Book of 
Bryn Mawr Pictures 

32 Gravure Reproductions of Photographs by 

IDA W. PRITCHETT, 1914 

"The pictures are extraordinarily fresh and inter' 
esting, the text a golden mean between explanation 
and sentiment, and the form of the book is 
distinguished." President Park. 

Now on Sale at the Alumnae Office for $1.00 

(10 cents extra for postage) 



Approved Penna. Private Business School 

BUSINESS TRAINING 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
AND SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 
for young men and women. 




One, Two and Three Years 
Day and Evening Courses 
8 Weeks Summer Session 



Founded 1865 



PEIRCE SCHOOL 



Pine St. West of Broad 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



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I 



I 



CAMP BIBECTORY 

All camps listed in this directory are owned, directed or pat- 
ronized by Bryn Mawr Alumnae. Please give them first con- 
sideration when selecting a camp for yourself or your children. 




BACK LOG CAMP 

SABAEL P. O., NEW YORK 

On Indian Lake in the Adirondack Mountains 
A Camp for Families and Adults 




1896 



1939 



PLAN NOW FOR NEXT SUMMER 

• Back Log Camp is a large tent camp (there are two cabins) in an inaccessible 
part of the Adirondack Mountains, in the State Preserve. On all sides lie unbroken 
stretches of forest. There is no other camp near it. Whether you choose an inactive 
holiday resting in the main camp for the most part, or an active vacation with fishing, 
hiking, over-night camping, and trail making, Back Log Camp has much to offer you. 
Good food, good company (men and women from many different colleges), complete 
freedom from the usual summer resort attractions, these attributes the Camp has kept 
through its long history. It is better to come in pairs, perhaps, but many ladies come 
alone and soon find congenial friends. 



For full information write to 



MRS. W. D. LAMBERT 



727 PARK AVE., TAKOMA PARK, D. C. 



HIGHFIELDS 
CAMP 

A Camp for Girls, 

9-17, 

on Alford Lake, 

East Union, Maine 

• 

Healthful location 

near Maine Coast. 

Junior, 

Intermediate, 

Senior groups. 

Cabins. 

Water sports, hockey, 

tap dancing, tennis, 

trips. 

Studio. 



CATALOGUE 

ALICE NICOLL, A.B. Bryn Mawr College, 1922, Director 

Address: 118 East 93rd Street, New York. New York 




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$ 
© 



CAMP MARIENFELD 




.liiiPilil 

liflill 



Camp Craft 

Nature Study 

Clay Modeling 

Pottery 

Art Metal 

Woodwork 

Photography 

Dramatics 



Experienced 

Tutoring in 

School Subjects 

and 

Instruction 

and Guidance 

in Music, 

Athletics, Arts, 

Occupations 



43rd Year 



CHESHAM, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

A Camp for Boys from 8 to 17 



Health and Energy through participation in group work or individual creative interests, 

with leadership and instruction in the activities which have a 

rightful place in a summer camp. 

Address: Raphael J. Shortlidge, Headmaster, The Pawling School, Pawling, N. Y. 



MRS. RAPHAEL J. SHORTLIDGE (Helen Wetmore Houghton, Smith '12) 
and ANNE and PEGGY SHORTLIDGE, conduct 

THE HILL CAMP FOR GIRLS 

The Hill Camp is a group of thirtythree girls, age 10 to 14, from July 9 to August 27. 
The Camp offers the life and activities that the family has enjoyed in residing next to 
Marienfeld, but in an entirely separate home community, active, congenial, unregimented. 




Water Sports, daily Horseback Riding, Tennis, Trips by day, Picnics, Group Activities 

in and out of doors 

Address: Mrs. Raphael J. Shortlidge, The Pawling School, Pawling, N. Y. 
(After June 19th, address Mr. or Mrs. Shortlidge, Chesham, New Hampshire) 



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CAMP RUNOIA 

BELGRADE LAKES, MAINE 

For Girls 6 to 16 




SAILING • RIDING • GOLF 
Customary Land and Water Sports 

For Information Address 
CONSTANCE DO WD GRANT, 1916 CONSTANCE KELLEN BRANHAM, 1916 

Glendale, Ohio Hingham, Massachusetts 

All Counsellor Positions Have Been Filled 



College Publications — 



Colleges and schools are exacting in the accuracy 
and quality of their printing — and rightly so! The 
printer serving this field must measure up to an 
exceptionally high standard. The John C. Winston 
Company for more than thirty years has served 
the colleges and schools in this section of the 
country so well that many of the first accounts are 
still prominent in the rapidly increasing list. 

This same accuracy and quality extends to the 
printing of catalogs, booklets, folders, private 
editions, etc., handled through the Commercial 
Printing Department. Then, too, the versatility of 
our equipment many times offers a surprising price 
advantage. 

The John C. Winston Co. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



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( J7ie jR/aAt Com6vmfiefi c/oea it... 



THE SECRET of Chesterfield's 
milder better taste... the reason 
why they give you more smok- 
ing pleasure ... is the right 
combination of the world's best 
cigarette tobaccos rolled in pure 
cigarette paper . . . the blend 
that can't be copied. 



Copyright 1939, Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 




THEY SATISFY 



BRYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 
BULLETIN 




ALUMNAE POINTS OF VIEW 



May, 1939 



Vol. XIX 



No. 5 



Entered as second-class matter, January 13, 1921, at the Post Office, Phila., Pa., under Act of March 3, 1S79 

COPYRIGHT, 1939 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



OFFICERS OF THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President Ida Lauer Darrow, 1921 

Vice-President Yvonne Stoddard Hayes, 1913 

Secretary Dorothea Chambers Blaisdell, 1919 

Treasurer Margaret E. Brusstar, 1903 

Chairman of the Finance Committee Edith Harris WV.st, 1926 

,-,• ^ . t \ Gertrude Hearne Myers, 1919 

Directors at Large { Ellenor Morris, 1927 

ALUMNAE SECRETARY, Mildred Buchanan Bassett, 1924 
EDITOR AND BUSINESS MANAGER OF THE BULLETIN 

Marjorie L. Thompson, 1912 

DISTRICT COUNCILLORS 

District I Elizabeth Lawrence Men dell, 1925 

District II Ruth Cheney Streeter, 1918 

District III Mildred Kimball Ruddock, 1936 

District IV Ruth Biddle Penfield, 1929 

District V Eloise G. ReQua, 1924 

District VI Delia Smith Mares, 1926 

District VII Katharine Collins Hayes, 1929 

ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 
Eleanor Little Aldrich, 1905 Adelaide W. Neall, 1906 

Mary Alden Morgan Lee, 1912 Ethel C. Dunham, 1914 

Eleanor Marquand Forsyth, 1919 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ALUMNAE FUND 
Edith Harris West, 1926 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 
Louise B. Dillingham, 1916 

CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUND COMMITTEE 
Caroline Lynch Byf.rs, 1920 

CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
Dr. M. Elizabeth Howe, 1924 

CHAIRMAN OF THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE 
Serena Hand Savage, 1922 



:TABLE OF CONTENTS: 



Editorial page 1 

The Older Woman and Employment, 

by Clara Belle Thompson, 1913 page 2 

Undergraduate Notes, by Mary R. Meigs, 1939 page 5 

The Psychologists Come to Bryn Mawr, bv Harry Helson page 6 

At Home to the Psychologists, by Charlotte Howe page 7 

In Memoriam: Tenney Frank, b^ Lily Ross Taylor page 8 

An English Tribute to Dr. Frank page 9 

A Secondary School Challenges the Colleges, 

bv Carmelita Chase Hinton, 1912 page 10 

The Alumnae Bookshelf page 13 

Young Sailors of Sidon 

By Elisabeth Kent Tarshis, 193) 

Of Interest to the Alumnae page 14 

College Calendar page 15 

Events for the Alumnae page 1 5 

News From the Districts page 1 6 

Class Notes page 17 

Camp Directory page 32 






Bryn Mawr Alumnae 
Bulletin 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 
THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNA ASSOCIATION 

Marjorie L. Thompson, '12, Editor and Business Manager 

EDITORIAL BOARD 
Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, '05 Denise Gallaudet Francis, '32 

. Emily Kimbrough Wrench, '21 Louise Congdon Francis, '00 

Pamela Burr, '28 Barbara L. Cary, '36 

Ida Lauer Darrow, '21, ex-ofticio 

Subscription Price, $1.50 a Tear Single Copies, 25 Cents 

Checks should be drawn to the order of Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 

Published monthly, except August, September and October, at 1006 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

All material should be sent to the Alumnae Office the first of each month. 

Vol. XIX MAY, 1939 No. 5 

With this copy of the Bulletin comes a Supplement containing the revised 
-By-Laws to be discussed and ratified at the Annual Meeting. This Supplement really 
marks an important milestone which we as an Association have passed. Since the first 
little group of alumnae united for those purposes which still unite some 3,000 or 
more of us, history has been made in a number of ways. It is all there to be read in 
the proposed changes. Certain distinctions between active and associate members have 
been put aside as the mere technicalities that they are, in view of the devoted service 
that those associate members often give. We have scrutinized our organization, which 
has become increasingly complex, and have secured continuity by adjusting terms of 
office and staggering elections. Duties are outlined as they actually are in practice, 
not theory. The very fact that there are Alumnae Directors turns us back to another 
epoch in our social history when a new relationship began between the alumnae and 
the College. That the Alumnae Directors play an increasingly significant role, both in 
relation to the Association and to the College, augurs well for the future. The 
formation of the Alumnae Council, nearly two decades ago, was an exciting new 
venture. The inclusion in its membership of a Faculty representative and of a 
representative of the Graduate School merely formalizes the practice of a number of 
years, but also indicates two significant relationships. The very term "District 
Organization" will sound like an ancient battle-cry to those alumnae who took valiant 
part in the early drives, and who based the geographical distribution on that of the 
Suffrage Party, — very ancient history, that, to many who will be reading the By-Laws 
through. That the Association has grown and flourished and found the lines along 
which it can best make its contributions to the College is there to be seen in the whole 
section given over to the functions of the various committees. And last of all, and as 
significant for the College as for the Association, is the Alumnae Fund. The history 
of a people may be read in its laws; here, then, are ours, clarified and brought 
realistically into line with actual practice. 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



THE OLDER WOMAN AND EMPLOYMENT 

By CLARA BELLE THOMPSON, 1913 
Co-author of We Are Forty and We Did Get Jobs 



JUST about a year ago my partner, 
Margaret Lukes Wise, and I started 
on a job trek that was to continue for 
ten weeks. We visited seven states, we 
got all sorts of jobs and we learned what 
every woman should know — especially if 
she has passed forty and is interested in 
work. As we took and continue to take 
our own medicine, this informal discus- 
sion smacks less of precept and more of 
example, and is, therefore, perhaps tol- 
erable. 

Here are quick sketches of us before 
and after taking. Before — both unem- 
ployed, low in spirits and faced with 
many personal problems. After — busy as 
beavers, enthusiastic about our work, and 
with new avenues of employment open- 
ing before us. Specifically we have writ- 
ten articles for three magazines and have 
now in the work orders for seven other 
articles. We are lecturing under the man- 
agement of one of the top lecture bureaus 
of New York City, and in two months 
have given thirty- odd lectures. We have 
been guest stars four times on national 
radio hook-ups, with other appearances 
already planned. And we have written a 
book — We Are Forty and We Did Get 
Jobs — which J. B. Lippincott Company 
thought good enough to publish and 
which has been reviewed in the Bulletin. 

What happened? What actually 
brought about such a salutary and profit- 
able transformation? Well, the first step 
was to have the right point of view. With 
unemployment figures running into the 
millions, with so much being said about 
shelving the older worker, with business 
reports none too hopeful, it is so easy to 
drop into a slough of despond. But we 
were not looking for negatives. So in our 



own circles we began a personal buildup. 
We talked about the tremendously val' 
uable experience the fortyyear-old has, 
how much more useful she can be than a 
novice in the business world, how much 
she can bring to an organisation with 
which she identifies herself. Writing these 
words here, they seem so true that one 
wonders that there ever could have been 
doubt. We believe them implicitly. We 
felt — we feel — that we are offering an 
employer something special when we pre 
sent ourselves and our experience. 

And yet within the past week we have 
met nine clever, well-dressed, educated, 
older women whom we should set down 
as unemployable. It is their point of view 
that shifts them to that class, and they 
can — if they will — get out of it. But 
here is their present attitude : "There are 
no more jobs for newspaper women, es' 
pecially the older woman." "Surely, I 
make the rounds, but I already know the 
answers. 11 "I wish now that I had spe- 
cialized in English instead of chemistry. 
It is so much easier to be a writer !" 
"When I think of all the money I have 
spent on business heads and lunches. J 
wine them, I dine them. But none can 
think of anything for me to do. 11 "I am 
an executive, and there just are no vacan- 
cies in the high brackets. 11 

Yet every one of those women could 
go back to the work that they need so 
sorely if they stopped blaming conditions, 
and began to blame themselves. 7^o re* 
porting jobs for the older woman? Yet 
one of us walked in, unannounced and 
unknown, and got a nice piece of public- 
ity work to do for a political convention. 
. . . 7s[o vacancies in high brac\ets? Then 
what about the low ones as a start? We 



[2] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



saw a woman who had been office man- 
ager in a small firm that was merged with 
a larger one, brush up on her shorthand 
and typing, and then take a position at 
eighteen dollars a week. But she could 
not keep it. She was promoted, then pre 
moted until within the year her salary 
had advanced to within twenty-five dol- 
lars of the position she had lost. . . . But 
none can thin\ of anything for me to do. 
That indeed is one of the crucial points 
on the whole employment set'Up. It is 
you who have to think of something that 
you can do, not the prospective employer. 
This conversation occurred in January, 
1939, at the office of a large Philadelphia 
plant. The woman had an excellent letter 
of introduction to the president. 

President: "What had you thought of 
- doing for us?" 

The lady: "Well, I don't know exact' 
ly. But there must be something I could 
do in a great big plant like this." 

President: "Such as what?" 

The lady: "Why you know more about 
that than I." 

And this unit hails from New York : 

The author: "Here are some of the 
things I have done. (She mentioned short 
stories she had written, a couple of books 
and a number of articles.) What about 
letting me take a shot at something for 
you?" 

The editor: "I am interested." 

The author: "What sort of things 
would you like?" 

The editor: "You tell me." 

The author : "Well, people always like 
first-person confessions, or, er — er — " 

The editor: "If you think of anything, 
you might drop us a line." 

In getting the right point of view, it is 
more than just thinking you are good. 
You have to finish that thought with good 
for what, good for whom? In other words, 
you are employable, of course. But what 
can you do, and who wants that sort of 
work done? 



My partner and I have both had rather 
extensive advertising experience. Yet for 
either of us to walk into an advertising 
office and ask for a copywriting job would 
be time wasted. The answer we know — 
it is "No." But we both won advertising 
positions by taking thought before we pre- 
sented ourselves. We sought the large 
agencies of two medium-sized towns, and 
each of us spent some time in learning 
the accounts they handled. Then we 
worked out rather spectacular promotion 
ideas on a couple of their accounts, took 
with us samples of past copy that would 
show our special fitness into their per- 
sonnel — and got not only a hearing but a 
hiring. 

Yet better advertising men and women 
than we, are walking the streets of the 
cities and saying to employment agencies : 
"I would take thirty-five a week now. I 
know that I never made less than a hun- 
dred. But thirty-five is better than noth- 
ing." But they find no takers, even for 
thirty-five. Point of view — point of view. 
If they would consider certain agencies, 
see how they could be valuable to them, 
paint the picture clearly, they would soon 
have positions. And they would not have 
to tear down their morale by making con' 
cession after concession until they felt de- 
feated and done. 

Personally, we distrust pep talks, and 
are terrified of bromides. But until the 
older woman — or any unemployed indi- 
vidual for that matter — says to herself: 
K[o one can defeat me, except me, and is 
honestly convinced of that truth, she is 
likely to remain without employment. It 
was only when we began to blame our' 
selves that we were in a position to take 
action. 

We could write, yes. But who wanted 
our writing? Any magazine, if the editors 
were impressed with our writing ideas. 
The next chore, then, was to dig in and 



[3] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



find ideas that were live and exciting and 
full of interest. Once we did that, we 
had the right to walk into an Adelaide 
Neall on the Saturday Evening Post or a 
Sumner Blossom of the American or a 
Fulton Cursler of Liberty. And if they 
did not like our suggestions, we were to 
blame. Or if they did not approve the 
writing, the fault was ours. 

Carry the same line of reasoning to any 
type of employment, and the applicant 
begins to see her work cut out for her. 
There is none of that indefinite looking 
for a position, but a clear-cut sizing-up of 
situations. If she can see how she could 
fit smartly into a certain firm or office or 
organization, then her next step is to con- 
vince someone in authority. Her utter 
conviction of her own ability is one good 
weapon. And here are several others. Be 
gay and enthusiastic. Employers who of- 
ten have little reason to feel either way, 
like a personnel with pep. Be confident 
in your personal presentation. There is 
nothing quite so convincing as the voice 
of experience and authority. And last of 
all, let the discussion be from the em- 
ployer's angle. For it is not what you 
want for yourself, but what you can do 
for him, that will put you on the payroll. 
Five times — under assumed names — we 
have found interesting positions in de- 
partment stores by underscoring that final 
thought. We have gotten a number of 
hotel jobs, work as credit investigators, 
secretarial positions which paid enough 
for a modest living and offered excellent 
opportunity for advancement, writing 



jobs, and a whole flock of minor but 
salary-paying jobs such as demonstrating, 
over-the-counter selling, companion, prac- 
tical nurse, and so on, — all on the basis 
that the employer was from Missouri and 
had to be shown. 

And in the showing, we made very cer- 
tain that our advance preparation was as 
sound as we could make it. We planned 
what we were going to say, how we were 
going to say it, what points had to be 
covered. If we did not know much about 
a business, we read trade journals, talked 
to persons in similar concerns, asked ques- 
tions of any one whom we thought might 
know. Then when the time came to ap- 
ply, we were primed with information 
and all set to go. 

Also- — and this drops us into the true 
confession group — we took thought of our 
appearance, to put the matter delicately. 
We were past forty, yes. We were not 
trying to mislead any collector of vital 
statistics. But we never talked our age to 
any employer, and please heaven, we 
never looked it either. We were not limp 
old ladies, but enthusiastic go-getters, ma- 
ture enough to be responsible. And if 
that be treason, make the most of it! 

There is still work, and it has to be 
done. That, of course, we knew without 
taking thought. But the work is naturally 
going to the person whom the employer 
considers best qualified. And our answer 
to ourselves is : No one chalks up quite so 
well as the adaptable, alert, well-in- 
formed, middle-aged woman — such for in- 
stance as M. L. W. or C. B. T. 



The president, dean, and a faculty representative from Mount Holyoke, 
Smith, Vassar, Wellesley, and Bryn Mawr respectively, met for a week-end in 
April on the Bryn Mawr campus to discuss academic problems that they have in 
common, — methods of admission, scholarship awards, final examinations, counsel- 
ing and personnel methods, methods of making faculty committee appointments, 
and refugee students. President Park entertained the Conference at dinner and 
the next day the entire group had lunch at the Deanery. 



[4] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 

UNDERGRADUATE NOTES 

By MARY R. MEIGS, 1939 



IN the spring of the year, with only a 
few weeks to bridge before they face 

the world, the seniors sometimes wish 
they were juniors, with a year more of 
grace. Nevertheless, while looking en' 
viously back, they have made plans for 
the future, which, according to Mrs. 
Crenshaw of the Bureau of Recommen' 
dations, are no vaguer than usual. It is 
certainly true that four years at Bryn 
Mawr, and perhaps at any college, cause 
the evolution of job-consciousness, that 
the independence of college life leaves its 
impress, and that if we turn toward any' 
thing after graduating, it is not the pleas- 
ures of domesticity. This self-sufficiency 
is what Bryn Mawr taught fifty years ago 
and what it still teaches. 

Out of a class of 94, 40 have applied 
to Mrs. Crenshaw for jobs. Of the others, 
some are uncertain, some have pushed out 
in other directions, five are going to med' 
ical school, and one has actually obtained 
a post as teacher of French at Milton 
Academy. Fourteen of the 40 want 
teaching jobs, 14 plan to take business 
courses for more specialised training, ten 
want to do government or social work. 
The majority of the latter majored in 
economics or social economy. 

Other interests are scattered through' 
out the class, not concentrated among the 
job-hunting 40. The Vogue contest, in 
which Bryn Mawr seniors have done con' 
sistently well, has absorbed the energies 
of about ten this year. Each quiz; requires 
four or five hours' work, so the time con- 
sumed is considerable. Possibly one out of 
the ten will win the first prize, six months 



in the Paris office of Vogue, or the second 
prize, six months in the New York office. 
Last year the second prize was won by 
Helen Hartman, who was enthusiastic 
enough to come down to Bryn Mawr and 
urge the present seniors to follow in her 
footsteps. One of the contestants, with 
more than one string to her bow, has 
applied for a teaching job at a French 
school in Algiers. 

The lectures which Mrs. Crenshaw and 
the Vocational Committee have sponsored 
have enlisted the support of numerous 
seniors who are still undecided about their 
careers. At the beginning of the year 
cards were distributed in the halls with 
vocations to be checked. The results were 
approximately the same as Mrs. Cren- 
shaw's other statistics, but there were 
added interests. Five checked laboratory 
work, two museum work, six magazine, 
newspaper and publishing houses, six 
theatre, and one who definitely plans to 
make it her vocation, photography. So 
far there have been three lectures: on 
Government Service, by Helen Hill 
Miller, 1921, on radio, on newspaper 
work, and there is one to come on teach- 
ing. The best attended of the three was 
the most recent, by Virginia Pope, Fash- 
ion Editor of the T^ew Yor\ Times. Both 
Miss Pope and Frank A. Arnold, who 
spoke on radio, described opportunities 
for women in their respective fields, and 
on the whole were more encouraging than 
previous speakers had been. The attend- 
ance at all the lectures has proved that 
students are genuinely interested in a 
variety of occupations. 



ERRATUM: In following style from last year's ballot, the printer followed 
substance as well. The Chairman of the Nominating Committee this year is Serena 
Hand Savage, 1922. We offer her our apologies. 

m 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



THE PSYCHOLOGISTS COME TO BRYN MAWR 



ON March 31st and April 1st, mem- 
bers of the Eastern Psychological 
Association met at Bryn Mawr for 
their 1939 annual meeting. It proved to 
be not only the largest meeting ever held 
on the Bryn Mawr campus, but the 
largest in the history of the Association, 
with 658 registered attendants, of whom 
over 400 were accommodated in the dor- 
mitories because of the spring recess. A 
total of 18 sessions was held for the pres- 
entations of 113 papers, embodying the 
results of original investigations, while a 
general session on Saturday afternoon 
was topped with an address by Dr. 
George Gallup on "Some Problems in the 
Measurement of Public Opinion. 1 ' All of 
the sessions were well attended, some hav- 
ing so many present they overflowed into 
the halls of the Chemistry- Geology Build- 
ing and Taylor. 

Some idea of the present scope of in- 
vestigations being carried on in psychol- 
ogy laboratories, clinics, schools, prisons, 
hospitals and courts can be gained from 
the general titles of the various sessions: 
Educational Psychology, Sensory Psychol- 
ogy, Brain Function, Attitudes, Applied 
Psychology, Experimentally Induced Con- 
flict, Abnormal, General and Experiment- 
al Psychology, Tests and Measurements, 
Animal Motivation, Vision and Audition, 
Genetic Psychology, Physiological Psy- 
chology, Conditioned Response, Person- 
ality, Human Learning, Intelligence, and 
Rorschach Tests. Titles of specific papers 
which were read at the meetings show the 
range of modern psychology from the 
minute brain waves requiring million- fold 
amplification for their detection to prob- 
lems of intelligence, industrial efficiency, 
and personality in all its phases. 

Meetings such as were held at Bryn 



Mawr were of interest to many besides 
professional psychologists. Both visitors 
and persons taking part included ' many 
not classed as professional psychologists, — 
medical men and women in divers 
branches of medicine, penologists, sociol- 
ogists, biologists, biophysicists, industrial 
workers, and many others. The points of 
contact of modern psychology with the 
other sciences, medicine, the arts, and 
industry, education, law, and so on are 
strikingly clear from the attendance and 
program of such a meeting. 

The Bryn Mawr meetings received 
high praise on several counts from those 
attending. The opportunity to obtain 
board and lodging of high order at prices 
far below hotel prices for equally good 
services brought many more than would 
ordinarily have come under other circum- 
stances. Everything necessary for both 
the meetings and the comfort of the guests 
was to be found right on the campus, and 
this made the meetings more self-con- 
tained than is the case when they are 
held in the cities. The "country 11 at- 
mosphere and comparative isolation of the 
campus made it possible for a spirit of 
gemiitlich\eit to prevail, which added 
greatly to the enjoyment of all. Finally, 
in closing, I must mention the excellent 
co-operation of the Hall Managers and 
the meticulous attention to details on the 
part of Miss Charlotte Howe which gave 
the local arrangements that final touch of 
civilized life which so many of the mem- 
bers of the Association commented upon 
and appreciated. The many expressions 
of thanks which reached the writer during 
and after the meetings showed that the 
guests of the College carried away a very 
friendly feeling for Bryn Mawr. 
Harry Helson, 
Chairman, Local Committee. 



[6] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 

AT HOME TO THE PSYCHOLOGISTS 



u 



t: 



'EN THOUSAND saw I at a 
glance" — an emotional exaggera- 
tion of the numerical truth when 
the College found itself host during 
spring vacation to a record-breaking 
meeting of the Eastern Psychological 
Association. Five hundred psychologists, 
including local guests, were expected, and 
seven hundred arrived. Denbigh, in which 
it had been planned only to serve meals, 
was quickly filled with overnight guests; 
with this addition and with the generous 
assistance of the Deanery and the Inn, 
everyone was taken care of, although it is 
doubtful whether the psychologist who 
decided to eat at the Inn instead of in 
the halls, in order to be by himself, found 
the conditions he expected. 

The registration desk and headquarters 
for the conference were located in the 
Deanery, which was ideally adapted to 
the requirements of a central place in 
which room assignments could be made, 
tickets sold, announcements given and 
mail distributed. From the Deanery, 
guests were sent to the various halls. 
Pembroke, Rockefeller, Denbigh and 
Rhoads attempted to dispel the chilly 
welcome offered by the weather with fires 
burning in reception rooms and flowers 
blooming on dining-room tables. The 
College green house supplied primroses 
to Pembroke, geraniums to Denbigh, be- 
gonias to Rhoads and cineraria to 
Rockefeller. 

In the bedrooms, students had cleared 
bureau drawers, provided hangers, and in 
some cases left welcoming notes. In one 
instance a student left a note offering the 
use of her victrola and record collection. 
The records were played with a great 
deal of pleasure, and the delighted guest 
sent the student a record which she did 



not own to add to her collection. While 
the guests did not attempt to psycho- 
analyse them on the evidence of their 
rooms, as the students prophesied, they 
evinced a lively interest in their absent 
hostesses, their books and belongings and 
asked questions about them — an interest 
which was equalled by the students who 
returned like the Three Bears to ask 
anxiously who had been sleeping in their 
beds. 

On both Friday and Saturday special 
luncheons were served in Denbigh. A 
reception to the entire convention was 
held in Rhoads on Friday evening. This 
followed within an hour a dinner in 
Rhoads, and there was some anxiety lest 
the two should overlap — and also some 
anxiety that the reception, which lasted 
until midnight, should not depart in time 
to restore the dining-room tables for 
breakfast! 

Informal meetings of the Association 
took place in the Deanery and in the 
halls; the scheduled meetings with papers 
were held in Taylor, Dalton, the new 
Science Building and Goodhart. Six and 
sometimes seven meetings were held at a 
time, and there were in all some hundred 
papers read. 

The College has certainly never had 
the pleasure of entertaining more appre- 
ciative guests — they liked the campus, the 
buildings, the rooms, the food, the ar- 
rangements for the convention and said 
so many times. Indeed, the president of 
the Association, speaking in Goodhart, 
said the meeting had been such a success, 
it would now be difficult for the Associa- 
tion to secure an invitation for next year's 
meeting. 

Charlotte Howe, 
Head Warden and Director of Halls. 



[7] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



IN MEMORIAM 
TENNEY FRANK 

ASSOCIATE, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, PROFESSOR OF LATIN, 
BRYN MAWR COLLEGE, 1904-1919 



AT Bryn Mawr we had the good 
fortune to know Dr. Frank not 
only as an eminent scholar but as 
a great teacher and a warm friend. He 
will be remembered by Latin majors, 
graduate and undergraduate, and also by 
the large group of alumnae who read 
Horace with him in Minor Latin. To 
many of us he opened a new world. He 
had nothing but scorn for the school of 
critics who saw in Latin literature simply 
the reproduction of Greek forms. Thor- 
oughly familiar with the life and litera- 
ture of his own time, he made his students 
see Lucretius and Catullus, Horace and 
Vergil as living representatives of the 
Roman Society in which he was equally 
at home. They will recall too his beau- 
tiful reading of Latin poetry and his feel- 
ing for the Italian countryside. At least 
for the graduate group for which I can 
speak from experience, he was a hard 
task-master. He once said that we needed 
in research "the patience to hunt for the 
last refractory fact." In the hunt we had 
the example of his own unwearying and 
joyous toil and the stimulus of contact 
with his original and wide-ranging mind. 
We had too his generous help and criti- 
cism, his interest, and his friendship. 

Dr. Frank's influence at the College 
has gone on in the years since he left to 
become Professor of Latin at Johns Hop- 
kins. Among his Ph.D.'s he numbered 
President Park and the two senior pro- 
fessors of Latin. Dr. Broughton was one 
of his collaborators in his great Economic 
Survey of Ancient Rome. Through his 
delightful books he is familiar to every 
student of Latin in the College. He him- 
self returned to Bryn Mawr in 1929 to 



give the Horace White Lecture. Since 
1926 his wife, Grace Frank, non-resident 
Professor of Old French Philology, has 
been in charge of the graduate work in 
Old French. In the faculty he, like his 
friend and colleague in the Latin Depart- 
ment, Dr. Wheeler, is known as a lead- 
ing spirit in formulating the "Plan of 
Government 1 ' which defines the relation 
between directors and faculty. It is still 
today one of the most liberal documents 
of college organization in America. 

Among the many distinctions which 
his scholarship brought to him, the crown- 
ing honour was the call to Oxford Uni- 
versity as the first classicist to hold the 
George Eastman Visiting Professorship. 
It was a recognition of his position as 
the foremost classical scholar in America. 
His letters to friends in America this 
winter have reflected his happiness in the 
companionship he found in England. He 
died suddenly from heart failure on April 
3rd. Like many great scholars before 
him, he is buried in Oxford. 

Ten books, several of which have been 
translated into foreign languages, and 
countless essays and reviews are an endur- 
ing monument to Dr. Frank's achieve- 
ment in practically every field of Roman 
studies — literature, linguistics, history, 
politics, economics, and archaeology. For 
him they were not isolated fields. His 
method of interpreting history from liter- 
ature and literature from history has 
been described in a recent notice in the 
London Times as "a technique of scholar- 
ship which was largely his own. 11 The 
same interrelation went through all his 
work. He hunted for and found in the 
Roman Campagna the quarries from 



[8] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



which Roman building stones came and 
interpreted his discoveries in the light of 
the early expansion of Roman power. He 
investigated the names on Roman tomb- 
stones and showed the enormous pre' 
ponderance of foreigners in the empire; 
with this change in population he con- 
nected the breakdown of inflections in the 
Latin language. Such bold and illuminat- 



ing associations were characteristic of Dr. 
Frank as we knew him. We find him 
again in his books. In the vivid pages of 
his Vergil and his History of Rome we 
meet again the feeling for the country- 
side, the hatred of tyranny and oppres- 
sion, the wit and the broad humanity that 
belonged to the man whom we admired 
and loved. 

Lily Ross Taylor, Ph.D., 1912. 



AN ENGLISH TRIBUTE TO DR. FRANK 



CYRIL BAILEY writes in the London 
Times : 
"The sudden death of Tenney Frank 
during his year as Eastman Professor at 
Oxford means a great loss to classical 
scholarship and to the study of Roman 
history. He had for years been well 
known in England by his writings, and in 
particular for the great Economic Survey 
of the Roman Empire, in which as editor 
he had enlisted the services of many schol- 
ars, both American and English. But 
those who during this year have had the 
opportunity of hearing him lecture and 
read papers to the classical societies have 
realised both the range of his learning 
and the strength and value of his convic- 
tion that history and literature must be 
studied together. The poets, historians, 
and orators cannot be understood without 
a realisation of the social conditions 
which lay behind them, while they in turn 
throw light on and are an essential factor 



in the history of the times. This was the 
theme of his Sather lectures at the Uni- 
versity of California and it runs through 
all his work. 

"But his friends will be thinking more 
now of his personality than of his writ- 
ings. Quiet and unassuming, always 
ready to appreciate the work of others, 
Frank had an unusually sane and steady 
outlook on life. He sympathised strongly 
with the English point of view and had 
a strong belief in the efficacy of patient 
work for peace. His conversation was full 
of wit and wisdom, based on a ripe ex' 
perience, and he had in the last year 
endeared himself to many new friends in 
Oxford. For he had a wide-hearted ap- 
preciation of friendship and a deep loyal- 
ty and affection. In every side of his life 
Mrs. Frank, herself an accomplished 
scholar, was his helper, and she will have 
the sympathy of many friends in her sud- 
den bereavement in a foreign country." 



At the meetings of the Eastern Psychological Association, Bryn Mawr 
played an active part: 

Mr. R. W. Bornemeier, instructor in the Department of Psychology, gave a 
special showing of the Maier film on "Experimental Neurosii in Rats" which was 
shown earlier to the undergraduates by Dr. MacKinnon. 

Professor Helson acted as chairman of a Round Table on "Mechanism in 
Visual Perception" and was elected Secretary-Treasurer of the Association for 
the following year. 

Professor MacKinnon read a paper, "Some Problems of Motivation in Rela- 
tion to Attitudes," in a Round Table on "Critical Problems in the Formation 
and Change in Attitudes." 

[9] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



A SECONDARY SCHOOL CHALLENGES 
THE COLLEGES 

By CARMELITA CHASE HINTON, 1912, Director of the Putney School 
The Account of an Educational Experiment, Now in Its Fourth Year 



THE reason for adding another school 
to the already crowded private 
school list was to see if a more vital 
kind of life might be given adolescents to 
answer their "growing pains." It seemed 
to me that the secondary schools, partic- 
ularly the college preparatory schools, 
were not giving adolescents the necessary 
environment in which to grow into really 
forceful red-blooded men and women. It 
was too artificial an existence. Much 
studying was done, perhaps too much of 
the parrot type; much time allowed for 
athletics, perhaps too much of the organ- 
ised kind. But what was being done to 
feed a desire for independence, to foster 
an ever-increasing growth in thought, to 
lead it into constructive channels, to teach 
the right use of freedom so that with it 
would go much self-discipline? What was 
done to answer the yearning for jobs, for 
responsibilities, for participation in an in- 
creasingly adult life, for knowing people 
of the opposite sex in a straight- 
forward way, for gaining skills for leisure 
time, for participating in the world of the 
creative arts, for making a more satisfac- 
tory adult life? So Putney was estab- 
lished, to try to work out something more 
satisfying and more realistic. 

We settled in the country where we 
could set up our own patterns of living, 
where the power of sophisticated urban 
life would be less dominating, where we 
must struggle first hand with the weather, 
where we would have the challenge to be 
self-supporting and where we could be 
self-supporting if we worked hard enough 
with our brains and our muscles, where 
our entertainment must be largely created 

[ 



by ourselves, where we must perforce get 
out of the habit of receptivity, where we 
must be up and doing. And though the 
fulfillment of our ideals is still in the dis- 
tance, we have found our life becoming 
more truly educative in the best sense. 
The students do find time, even with a 
stiff academic program, to work on the 
farm if they like, to lumber in the forests, 
to make music, to paint and sculpture, to 
write, to follow practical mechanical bents 
— to build the school, not have it handed 
out, ready made. And nature has helped 
stiffen us up; she has not been easy. She 
has sent us floods, bli^ards, droughts, 
even a hurricane, and without the ready 
resources of a city we have grappled with 
the elements, challenged to use our 
wits and our hands. Such an environ- 
ment does make sturdy, thinking boys and 
girls, who not only study hard, but work 
and play hard, and put themselves whole- 
heartedly into life. So strong indeed is the 
feeling for work that the children have 
so far preferred to do manual labour about 
the place many afternoons a week instead 
of the usual games. 

That the life may not be the rather 
restricted one of a school, we have tried 
to build a little world on our Vermont 
hill. Our farm and saw-mill are elements 
in this picture; there are also an inn, youth 
hostel, general store, theatre. We try 
to connect ourselves as closely as pos- 
sible with the strong currents of life be- 
low the hill, to identify ourselves with the 
village of Putney and with Vermont, to 
make their troubles and joys ours. We 
go to the town meetings, the church sup- 
pers; we are an audience for their plays 

10] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



and they for ours. In the fall we are the 
eenter of a harvest festival and in the 
spring we put on a maple sugar festival. 
We hope to have another sueh common 
gathering when the Vermont Symphony 
Orchestra comes here to play in June. 
We are also trying to get the surrounding 
countryside to come to our art exhibits, 
our concerts and lectures. 

There are, of course, difficulties. Putney 
village is slow to understand us, to accept 
us. The Yankee opens up only gradually. 
And there are the limitations set by time. 
Children's lives can become too full. They 
have to see the whole picture as clearly 
as possible and then be led to study them- 
selves and see where their interests lie; 
they have to learn to conserve and direct 
their energies, not dissipate them in try- 
ing to do everything at once. But the 
greatest barrier to the realisation of the 
best life for the student lies at the door 
of the colleges. 

Practically every boy and girl here goes 
on to an institution of college level, to 
Harvard, Yale, Haverford, Dartmouth, 
Bryn Mawr, Smith, Swarthmore, Ben- 
nington. We want them to go on, to be 
eager to learn. But we do fret against the 
arbitrary demands made upon us before 
they are allowed to go on. For some col- 
leges, art and music, particularly music 
theory courses, are allowed to play a part 
in the preparation, but for many the re- 
quirements are still narrowly stipulated. 
However, from our point of view these 
colleges are not even asking for a thor- 
ough fundamental education. They are 
asking only for a smattering of this and 
that. The usual demand is, "Give us one 
credit in history, one in science, two years 
of one language and three of another, 
etc." Nothing really well or deeply 
learned, just a touch here and a skimming 
there. English — yes, English does go on 
for four years. At Putney, in spite of col- 

[ 



lege requirements, we are tiying to carry 
on some of the things we start. Four years 
of history, with four years of English, and 
whenever possible, four years of science; 
as much mathematics as the capacities of 
our students can absorb, and — not quite 
so much language. One can't do every- 
thing. 

We ask the question — what are the 
important things for a human being to 
know? Are we really educating, or just 
going along blindly or timidly on the 
momentum of tradition? To know all 
might be ideal, but we are limited by 
our capacities and by time. The colleges 
should not require that every preparatory 
student produce just so much of this and 
that subject, but should allow us to study 
the student and prescribe the best foun- 
dations for him for later work and his 
adult life. Is the important thing in edu- 
cation to prepare the student for college 
or for his own best personal growth? 
Wouldn't we have far more forceful and 
colorful personalities if we approached 
our education from this angle? Wouldn't 
the colleges in the end much prefer stu- 
dents so nurtured? 

Let us go further with the question — 
not quite so much language. Wouldn't 
one language thoroughly mastered be pre- 
ferable to the superficial jumble our stu- 
dents now acquire? To what cultural 
pursuits, moreover, do most of us edu- 
cated adults in the United States give our 
attention? Think objectively. Answer 
honestly. How is the bul\ of our leisure 
time spent, when given to cultural pur- 
suits, — in utilising our French and Ger- 
man, our Latin and Greek, in speaking or 
even in reading those languages? No. I am 
sure it is not. Isn't our attention largely 
absorbed by current American and Eng- 
lish literature and politics, by struggles 
to keep abreast of what is being done in 
the fields of art and music, in attending 

11] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



chamber music and symphony concerts, 
in discussing and attending plays? If, as 
children, we had been soaked in art forms 
and expressions, wouldn't the level to 
which we as a nation could attain be 
much higher and our lives exceedingly 
richer? Wouldn't a large part of the time 
that we give to language study today, be- 
cause it is required by the colleges, be 
more profitably spent on music in its dif- 
ferent aspects? Wouldn't the ability to 
paint and draw, carve and model, to free 
ourselves in expression of this sort, per- 
haps mean more to us than language 
skills? Let me reiterate once more the 
crucial point. There is not time for every- 
thing. One must weigh ultimate values. 
Should it not be considered an educa- 
tional sin for a child to have to give up 
the study of music or art because his 
preparation for college is making too 
many demands on his energies? It seems 
to me that the vision towards which 
Aldous Huxley in his recent book, Ends 
and Means, and others, are driving — to 
have our education tie up with action, 
with living what we learn — is the one to- 
wards which the colleges must leave us 
free to strive. 

With this philosophy underlying the 
policies of the school, a genuine love of 
music has been created here at Putney, 
even while meeting the heavy load of col- 
lege demands. Nearly everyone plays an 
instrument; there is a large orchestra 
group; the, whole school joins in choral 
singing, and listens every evening after 
supper to the records from the Carnegie 



Music Set given us this fall. Many are 
just as keen about other art forms. The 
studio is always full, and once in two 
weeks there is an evening art assembly. 
Paintings of different artists are thrown 
on the screen depicting some aspect of 
life, such as people in action: boxing, 
playing football, skating, skiing. After 
discussion each student takes pencil in 
hand to see what he can do in the same 
mood, and their work is then exhibited. 
Photography as a form of creative expres- 
sion is also encouraged. Good writing 
and poetry flourish. Drama is another 
respected medium. 

In the summer the school has a work 
camp. Campers labour in the morning in 
the fields, on the playgrounds, in helping 
construct new buildings; in the afternoon 
they find relaxation not only in sports 
but in the above-mentioned art activities. 
In free time, when each one is doing 
exactly as he wishes, practically no one 
turns to the study of languages. Does 
this not further prove my point? Chil- 
dren, like adults, crave creative expres- 
sion. Music, drama and art prosper. 

But even when we say — not quite so 
much language, we try to vitalise what 
language study we do give, by promoting 
trips to Europe in the summer, to France, 
Scandinavia, Germany, Austria. We keep 
off the beaten paths, try to hear and speak 
as much as possible the foreign tongues, 
understand the foreign ways. The trips 
are done in simple style. We live first 
hand, steering away from too much theory 
and too much abstraction. 



THE HUDSON SHORE LABOR SCHOOL 

MISS JEAN CARTER reports that applications for admission to the School, both 
from prospective students and from undergraduate assistants, are coming in in 
large numbers. The alumnae of the school are enthusiastic about its new location and 
are making themselves responsible for a number of scholarships. The house-warming 
will be held May 14th to 16th. 

[12] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



ALUMNAE BOOKSHELF 



YOUNG SAILORS OF SIDON. A 

Story of Long-Ago Phoenicia. By 
Elizabeth Kent Tarshis. Illustrated by 
Richard A. Holberg. L. C. Page and 
Co. $1.50. 

IT is doubtful if this book could be any- 
more entertaining for children of five, 
twelve and fourteen— the ages of its 
youthful heroes and heroine — than it was 
for this child of twenty four. Not only 
has it the requisite qualifications of time, 
place, and action, plot, drama and char' 
acter but it is imbued with a living reality, 
an exciting immediateness that cannot fail 
to attract children and surely is delightful 
to grown-up readers as well. If one has 
the good fortune to know the author, or 
the part of the world of which she 
writes, or both, one is even more enthusi- 
astic. For the greatness of the land of 
Phoenicia and her contributions to civili- 
nation that may seem rather dull as rep- 
resented in history books, is here personi- 
fied and set within a frame of truth and 
accuracy. You could not be unaware of 
the significance of the Phoenician alpha- 
bet, after Tubal puts his knowledge of 
writing to such advantage; you could not 
fail to appreciate the beauty and wonder 
of Syrian glass after you have known the 
skill with which Mattan learned to make 
it; you could never see even a purple 
crocus on the lawn but what you would 
remember Dione's skillful manipulation 
of the mollusk shells, gathering them in 
the night, and dyeing her hand-woven 
materials in the great vats of blue and 
purple that spilled onto her leg and 
wouldn't come off for many days! History 
is made by human beings, after all, and 
how much more vivid it is when we know 
something about these people that made 
it. We wish the author had given even 



more of the story over to these pictures, 
for the impressions perhaps need to be 
dwelt upon a little more fully to register 
on the minds of children. 

Besides the emphasis of these features 
of Phoenician origin, woven into a color- 
ful and rich tapestry of clever though 
brief picture-writing, there is all the ex- 
citement of unexpected situation, perhaps 
the most appealing to children. Will 
Uncle Hamilcar bring the monkey? Will 
they manage to slip the Dione safely out 
of the harbor? Will they survive the 
treacherous storm that tore away their 
mast on the northern route? We should 
like to have gone more slowly through 
the islands on that trip although we 
shared some of the children's impatience 
to reach Tarshish. 

Throughout the story are charming 
touches of what many readers will rec- 
ognize as the inimitable humour of the 
author: touches of whimsy which how- 
ever are perhaps more to be appreciated 
by a somewhat older generation than that 
for which they are written: how-else- 
would-you-say-its like "He carries a secret 
around with him like a squirrel with nuts 
in his cheeks." Hanno gets his fishline all 
tangled and brings it to Dione to 
straighten out, saying, "I don't know 
what makes all those knots." "It must 
be the fish," says Dione. "They don't 
want you to catch them so they come out 
at night and tie knots in your line." 

We think this book is such a success, 
we'd like to see the author do the same 
sort of thing again — in another country, 
with another civilization. For though 
this may be primarily intended for chil- 
dren, we, for one, feel very strongly that 
the art of teaching history this way is a 
thing to be vigorously encouraged. 

Doreen D. Can ada y, 1936. 






[13] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



OF INTEREST TO THE ALUMNAE 



BOTH Dean Manning and Mr. 
Charles G. Fenwick, of the Depart' 
ment of Economics and Politics, 
have been giving expert testimony before 
the House Foreign Relations Committee 
in Washington, in connection with the 
proposed amendments to our present neu- 
trality laws. 

Mary L. Jobe Akeley, graduate stu- 
dent 19014903, lectured in Goodhart 
April 4th on her African expeditions, and 
the work she has done in connection with 
the great African Hall in the American 
Museum of Natural History in New 
York. 

Hetty Goldman, 1903, is giving at the 
College a series of three lectures on 
"Aspects of Early Anatolian Civilisa- 
tion. " The College K[ews says of them: 
"These lectures will present an archaeo- 
logical synthesis, never before attempted, 
of Asia Minor in remote antiquity. In 
her capacity as Director of the joint exca- 
vation of Bryn Mawr College, and the 
Institute for Advanced Study of Prince- 
ton, Miss Goldman is probably best fitted 
of any living scholar to undertake the 
task." 

Mr. Rhys Carpenter, of the Depart- 
ment of Classical Archaeology, will be 
Professor-in-charge at the Classical School 



of the American Academy in Rome next 
year. 

Delight Tolles, M.A. 1936, has won a 
Fellowship at the American Academy at 
Rome for next year. Sarah Anderson, 
M.A. 1937, and Mary Campbell, M.A. 
1936, will hold Fellowships at the Ameri- 
can School of Classical Studies at Athens. 

Mr. Samuel C. Chew, of the Depart- 
ment of English, will give a lecture on 
May 1st to which the general public are 
invited in Goodhart Hall. His subject is 
the delightful one: "Time and Fortune 
in the Elizabethan Imagination." 

Helen Rice, 1923, Warden of Rhoads, 
on April 16th directed the chamber music 
in the concert given by the students for 
the benefit of the Bryn Mawr League. 
The selection was Mozart's Eine Kleine 
J\[achtmusi\. This lively piece was played 
by an ensemble of twelve. Eleanor Ben- 
ditt, 1939; Louise Herron, 1939; Henri- 
etta Butler, 1942, and Blanche Anderson, 
graduate student, played first violin. Miss 
Rice played second violin, with Nicoline 
Samsom, graduate student; Helen Ham- 
ilton, 1939, and Mary Newberry, 1940. 
Violas were played by Helen Bacon, 1940, 
and Polly Coan, 1941, and 'cellos by 
Naomi Coplin and Helen Garth, graduate 
students. 



REUNIONS 

Class Headquarters Class Suppers Reunion Managers 

1889 Deanery Blue Room Anna Rhoads Ladd 

1899 Pembroke West Common Room Emma Guffey Miller 

1900 Rockefeller Wyndham M. Helen MacCoy 

1 90 1 .Rhoads South Deanery. Beatrice MacGeorge 

1902 Pembroke East Wyndham H. Jean Crawford 

1918 Denbigh Rhoads South Ruth Cheney Streeter 

1919 Rockefeller Rockefeller Mary Ramsay Phelps 

1 920 Pembroke East Deanery Millicent Carey Mcintosh 

1921 Pembroke West Denbigh Margaret Taylor Macintosh 

1937 Merion Picnic Rachel W. Brooks 

1938 Rhoads South Picnic Helen R. Shepard 

[14] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 






CLASS NOTES 



REUNION CLASSES 
1889, 1899, 1900, 1901, 1902, 1918, 1919, 1920, 1921, 1937, 1931 



DOCTORS OF PHILOSOPHY 
MASTERS OF ART 
FORMER GRADUATE STUDENTS 
Editor: Vesta M. Sonne 
Radnor Hall, 
Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Class Collector for Doctors of Philosophy: 
Marion R. Stoll 

Class Collector for Masters of Art and 
Graduate Students: 
Helen Lowengrund Jacoby 
(Mrs. George Jacoby) 

1889 

Class Editor: Sophia Weygandt Harris 
(Mrs. John McA. Harris) 
105 W. Walnut Lane, Germantown, Pa. 

Class Collector: Martha G. Thomas 

1890 

No Editor Appointed 
Class Collector: Elizabeth Harris Keiser 
(Mrs. Edward H. Keiser) 

1891 
No Editor Appointed 
Class Collector: Helen Annan Scribner 
(Mrs. Arthur H. Scribner) 
The Class will be sorry to hear of the death 
of Maria V. Bedinger, at her home in Anchor' 
age, Kentucky. She taught for forty years, and 
is widely and affectionately remembered. 

1892 

Class Editor and Class Collector: 

Edith Wetherill Ives (Mrs. F. M. Ives) 
28 East 70th Street, New York, N. Y. 
1893 

Class Editor: Susan Walker FitzGerald 
(Mrs. Richard Y. FitzGerald) 
7 Greenough Ave., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Class Collector: Elizabeth Nichols Moores 
(Mrs. Charles W. Moores) 

1894 

Class Editor and Class Collector: 
Abby Brayton Durfee 
(Mrs. Randall N. Durfee) 
19 Highland Ave., Fall River, Mass. 

189? 

Class Editor: Susan Fowler 

420 W. 118th St., New York City 

Class Collector: Elizabeth Bent Clark 
(Mrs. Herbert Lincoln Clark) 



1896 
Class Editor: Abigail Camp Dimon 

1411 Genesee St., Utica, New York 
Class Collector: Ruth Furness Porter 

(Mrs. James F. Porter) 

1897 

Class Editor: Friedrika Heyl 
104 Lake Shore Drive, East, 
Dunkirk, N. Y. 

Class Collector: Sue Avis Blake 

Through May Campbell and Sue Blake, who 
recently made a little detour to Boonton 
en route to New York, we have learned that 
Molly Peckham Tubby spent two weeks in 
Bermuda in March. 

M. M. C. also reported that Frances Fincke 
Hand has been abroad. We are eager to hear 
more about her trip, especially the visit to 
Germany. 

We are grateful to Elizabeth Seymour Angel 
for the following letter telling of the work 
that her older son has been doing for the past 
two years. (The Editor has learned through 
further inquiry from Beth that Lawrence, who 
took his B.A. from Harvard in 1936, was 
married in July, 1937, to Margaret Richardson, 
daughter of Dr. Henry B. Richardson of New 
York Hospital. She studied at the Brearley 
School — "and loved there many of our con' 
temporaries, some of whom had taught her 
mother" — and then got a Regional Scholar- 
ship for Radcliffe where she is graduating this 
year. She spent her junior year in Greece.) 

"The reason the news seems pertinent for 
publication, apart from my being permitted to 
boast to my own classmates, is that he has 
been in touch with Bryn Mawr graduates in 
Greece these last two winters. His and 
Peggy's especial friends have had some con- 
nection with Bryn Mawr. They would know 
him as l Larry Angel.'' 

"His Fellowship for the first winter was 
from the Harvard Department of Anthropol- 
ogy, as he went to measure skulls; for the 
second year it was from Classical Department. 
This pleased him very much, as a sort of rec 
ognition that physical anthropology is a part 
of classical archaeology. He and his wife lived 
at the American School, and worked largely 
in Athens. For many months they had the 
use of a laboratory on the Agora digs, and 
shared the lunch and interests of the Agora 
archaeologists. Larry measured the skulls found 



[17] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



there, an interesting lot because the work had 
been beautifully done and everything can be 
well dated. He also had the skulls in the 
museums and medical school of Athens — the 
ancient skulls — and was honoured last spring 
by being made a Fellow of the Greek An- 
thropological Society for this work. At the 
Athens National Museum, when he dealt with 
the very precious skulls which Schliemann 
found in Mycenae, he was limited to brief 
hours and was superintended by one of the 
chiefs of the museum — not a mere guard. 
They had a month in Olynthus, hoping to 
measure a lot of skulls from early fourth cen- 
tury graves, but found most had been wan- 
tonly broken just before they got there, so 
they spent much time on modern living 
Greeks, which was an interesting job. Another 
month they spent in Istanbul, mostly over the 
skulls from Troy. The work is research work 
as a basis for his Ph.D. thesis, which is for 
Harvard next year or the year after. 

"It is a delight to me that my son, who had 
deserted classics after sophomore year for his 
anthropology, should find classics useful and 
should know so well the country which was 
so dear to his grandfather, as well as to his 
parents. And I love to have him connected 
a little with Bryn Mawr archaeologists. 

"My younger son is a junior at Yale, desert- 
ing family traditions by working at Sheff. in 
chemistry and physics."" 

1898 

Class Editor: Edith Schoff Boericke 
(Mrs. John J. Boericke) 
333 Pembroke Road, Bala-Cynwyd, Pa. 

Class Collector: Elizabeth Nields Bancroft 
(Mrs. Wilfred Bancroft) 

1899 

Class Editor: May Schoneman Sax 
(Mrs. Percival Sax) 
6429 Drexel Road, Overbrook 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Class Collector: Mary F. Hoyt 

1900 

Class Editor and Class Collector: 
Louise Congdon Francis 
(Mrs. Richard S. Francis) 
414 Old Lancaster Road, Haverford, Pa. 

The Editor has learned that some of out- 
classmates have new addresses: 

Eva Palmer Sikelianos lives at 116 Field 
Point Road, Greenwich, Connecticut; Alletta 
Van Reypen Korff has moved to 2601 Foxhall 
Road, Washington, D. C; Edith Wright is 
spending the winter at 2701 Connecticut 
Avenue, Washington, D. C. 



1901 

Class Editor and Class Collector: 
Beatrice MacGeorge 
Bettws-y-Coed, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

1902 

CJass Editor: Elizabeth Chandlee Form an 
(Mrs. Horace Baker Forman, Jr.) 
Haverford, Pa. 
Class Collector : Marion Haines Emlen 
(Mrs. Samuel Emlen) 

The Class extends deepest sympathy to the 
family of Frances Morris Orr, who died fol- 
lowing an operation in Pittsburgh on Monday, 
April 17th. 

Frances had been living in an apartment in 
New York since her husband's death two years 
ago, where she had continued her painting. 

One of her pictures, presented to the 
Alumnae Association a short time ago, is hung 
in the Alumnae Lounge in the Deanery. 

The Class wishes to express its sincere sym- 
pathy with Harriet Vaille Bouck in the sudden 
death of her father in Honolulu, where they 
had gone for a holiday. 

Our succulent supper, dear classmates, will 
fall on Saturday, June 3rd — best day of all — 
and Sunday is set for Alumnae Day, and 
Monday for a picnic with upper class (es), gay, 
and Tuesday for party-in-garden historic, and 
Wednesday for climax — Commencement, come 
for it! But if there is more that you'd like 
to attend, then quickly announce it to Craw- 
ford, your friend! E. C. F. 

Helen Stewart Huyler hopes there is going 
to be a Class Reunion as she is coming East 
from Honolulu to attend her daughter's Bryn 
Mawr graduation! This is good news all 
around. 

Welcome news comes from Miriam Strong 
Sladen and her family of Wichita, Kansas: 
"My son, Joseph Alton Sladen, was born 
August 13, 1909, in Portland, Oregon, gradu- 
ated from the University of Wisconsin 1931. 
has worked for the Pennsylvania Railroad ever 
since in the freight department, is now in the 
Boston office, and lives in a cute Cape Cod 
house in Wellesley. He married February 1, 
1934, a very fine Chicago girl and has a son 
eight months old and named for my husband. 

"My daughter, Mary Elisabeth Sladen, was 
born July 3, 1918, and is a senior at Leland 
Stanford, which she chose instead of Bryn 
Mawr, to the glee of my husband who is 
Stanford 1898. She is blissful and busy, 
making fine grades, learning lots besides 'book 
learning,' is in fact one of the outstanding 
'women' on the Quad, as she is mixed up in 
athletics, and in their really outstanding self- 



[18] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



government, also is President of 'Cap and 
Gown 1 (honorary). She plays a good game 
of golf and is almost as silly about it as her 
mother. We look forward to going out for 
her graduation. 

"As for me, I'm not especially interesting 
but will report as requested. My enthusiasm 
for Kansas and the Middle West will never 
be unbounded, but there are fine people here 
and I have many good friends, and have spent 
almost thirty busy and happy years here. 

"I don't like daytime society, but love doing 
things in the evening with my husband, and 
play golf in and out of season, even yet. For 
years I was busy in some civic activity, Com' 
munity Chest, Vice-President of League of 
Women Voters, on School Board for four 
years, and Commissioner of the Girl Scouts 
for another four, but I have handed such 
things over to the younger women now, and 
to keep on good terms with a rather cranky 
thyroid gland, live as much like a cabbage as 
possible!" 

Ruth Miles Witherspoon has joined our 
grandmotherly ranks. Her first grandchild, 
Ruth Jeanne, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam Witherspoon, was born January 14, 1939. 

Elizabeth Lyon Belknap has four children. 
The eldest, Anne, married Palmer Scott, and 
has a daughter, Thalia, aged three, and a son, 
Duncan, aged eight. Elizabeth's second child, 
William, lives in Coconut Grove, Florida. Her 
third, Robert E. Belknap, Jr., married Molly 
Rogers and has a son, Robert E. Belknap, III. 
They live at Gwynedd Valley, Pennsylvania. 
Elizabeth's fourth, Rhoda, was formally pre 
sented in Boston this winter, "a very hectic 
and jolly one," writes her mother. Rhoda has 
had her portrait painted by Patty Jenkins 
Foote's sister-in-law, Margaret Hawley. Eliza- 
beth and Rhoda spent February and March 
at their house at Hobe Sound, Florida, where 
they were to receive a visit from travelled 
Anne Rotan Howe en route from Texas. 

Word comes from Frances Adams Johnson 
of a granddaughter, Alden Johnson, the first 
child of her eldest son, Dr. Bascom Johnson, 
Jr., and Mrs. Johnson, born September 24, 
1938, at Mount Kisco, New York. 

Grace Douglas Johnston writes of her 
growing family: "I'm afraid I haven't any 
very exciting news except that I now have two 
grandchildren (assorted sexes) and five great 
nephews and nieces; the whole seven have 
arrived in the past six years." Quite a crowd 
to keep Grace young and happy. Imagine 
what their Christmas holidays must be like 
and will be for some time! 

Grace also says she is sending out double 
postcards for the Reunion and hopes many will 
plan to come and will answer promptly. 



Elizabeth Chandlee Forman wrote the Class 
Collector she was leaving the end of 
March for a two weeks' trip to Piedmont, 
Province of Quebec, Canada. M. H. E. 

1903 
Class Editor: Mabel Harriet Norton 

540 W. California St., Pasadena, Calif. 
Class Collector: Caroline F. Wagner 

Florence Wattson Hay is recovering from 
an accident which nearly cost her the loss of 
an eye. Fortunately her sight was spared. 

May Montague Guild has joined that 
superior class known as grandmothers. Lucy 
Ann Quirk arrived in Los Angeles on the 
6th of March. 

Your Editor apologizes for having misled 
you by reference to a Reunion. It is due in 
1940, and not this year. 

1904 

Class Editor: Emma O. Thompson 

320 South 42nd St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Class Collector: Isabel M. Peters 

Evelyn Holiday Patterson's daughter, Evelyn 
Macfarlane, was married to Mr. Burton Hal- 
stead on March 24, 1939. 

1905 

Class Editor: Eleanor Little Aldrich 

(Mrs. Talbot Aldrich) 

59 Mount Vernon St., Boston, Mass. 
Class Collector: 

Margaret Nichols Hardenbergh 

(Mrs. Clarence M. Hardenbergh) 

1906 

Class Editor: Louise Cruice Sturdevant 
(Mrs. Edward W. Sturdevant) 
3006 P St., Washington, D. C. 

Class Collector: 

Elizabeth Harrington Brooks 
(Mrs. Arthur S. Brooks) 

Anna McAnulty Stevens has moved to the 
country. Her address is Tip Top Farm, 
Waverly, Pennsylvania. 

Katharine McCauley Fearing, living in 
Greenwich, reports that the usual suburban 
occupations keep her busy, gardening, building 
additions to the house, etc. Katharine, Jr., will 
be ready for college in 1941 and seems to be 
headed towards Smith. Tut! Tut! Katharine 
and her husband took a six weeks' motor trip 
to Florida during the winter, stopping at 
Charleston and Williamsburg on their way 
home. 

Marion Mudge Prichard has moved back tc 
Beverly, Massachusetts, where she spent the 
first years of her married life. Her youngest 
son married the daughter of one of her best 



r 19] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



friends and they now have a small daughter, 
Ruth, known to her intimates as Penny Prich' 
ard. Marion mailed her card in Washington, 
D. C, on her way West to visit her daughter, 
but the Class Editor had no firsthand knowl' 
edge of her visit! 

Alice Ropes Kellogg writes from Forest 
Grove, Oregon. Her oldest daughter returned 
in February from a long stay in Boston. Her 
daughter, Margaret, married in August, 1937 
(and you never told us, Alice!), has continued 
her teaching but will give it up at the end of 
this school year. The third girl, Ruth, is study 
ing in Portland, and Betty, the baby, is a 
sophomore at Pacific University in Forest 
Grove. The Kelloggs have been working in 
the church at Forest Grove since September, 
1932, and are very happy there and have a 
fine group of people in the congregation. 

1907 

Class Editor and Class Collector: 
Alice M. Hawkins 
Low Buildings, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Among the recent visitors to the campus 
was Ellen Thayer, who spent a quiet week at 
the Deanery. She attended as many classes as 
she could work in, and expressed herself as 
well pleased with the College in general, espc 
daily the undergraduates whom she met, who 
included Elisabeth Kerr, a freshman niece of 
Katharine Kerr. While here Ellen went over 
with us briefly a fascinating volume which she 
had helped to compile, made up of every single 
published criticism of the Theatre Guild's pro' 
duction of Madame Bovary. Terry Helburn 
and E. Schenck, of course, had several hands 
in this undertaking, which has been received 
with the greatest enthusiasm and gratitude by 
the group in France for whom it was prepared. 

Tink Meigs writes that she has just about 
finished the school readers on which she had 
been working so long. They are made up of 
stories of heroes and heroines in American 
history, and bid fair to revolutionize many 
classroom hours. In June Tink hopes to go 
to England With her niece, Grace Fales, 1938. 

Grace Brownell Daniels writes: "My oldest 
daughter, Susan Daniels, Bryn Mawr 1934, is 
marrying William Pierrepont White, Jr., of 
Utica and Clinton, New York, in New York 
City on April 15th. John Lothrop Daniels, 
who graduated from Harvard last spring, has 
a job with Grumman Aircraft on Long Island. 
Stoddard is at Kent School, and Josephine 
married Charles Belknap Lockwood of New 
York City last June 25th." 

Our only 1907 child due to graduate from 
Bryn Mawr this June is Peggy Otis, Alice 
Wardwell's daughter. The whole campus will 



miss the clever column, "Wit's End," which 
she has contributed for several years to the 
College K[ews. She has been on the Editorial 
Board since her freshman year, and during her 
junior year in France acted as a foreign cor' 
respondent, sending regular news of the stu' 
dents in and around Paris. 

Mabel O'Sullivan has been hard at work 
training her students at Rosemont College for 
their first Comprehensives in English Litera' 
ture. Last year she had reason to be proud 
of the record made by her Honour students 
for an outside examiner, and now all her 
Majors are to submit themselves to the same 
ordeal. 

1908 

Class Editor: Mary Kinsley Best 
(Mrs. William Henry Best) 
1198 Bush wick Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Class Collector: Eleanor Rambo 

Helen North Hunter has a painting, a land' 
scape, now hung in the annual Oil Exhibition 
at the Plastic Club in Philadelphia. She is 
studying with Fern Coppedge, the landscape 
painter, "and enjoying it immensely.'" 

In a recent issue of the Pittsburgh Sun' 
Telegraph is an article on Helen's daughter, 
Laura, 1932, one of a series about "Pittsburgh 
Women Who Do Unusual Things," under the 
caption, "Dr. Laura North Hunter, Assistant 
Professor of Biology at Pennsylvania College 
for Women, Does Research in Spare Time." 
And the article contains a large "close'up" of 
her peering into a microscope. Dr. Hunter 
spends her summers at the Marine Biological 
Laboratory at Woods Hole, Massachusetts. 

Some other 1908 mothers who are members 
of the Cornelia Club, basking in the brilliance 
of their jewels, are Melanie Atherton Upde' 
graff, whose daughter Ann has a principal 
role in the forthcoming Gondoliers (Ann also 
sings in the College choir); Louise Milligan 
Herron, whose daughter Louise, 1939, is music 
correspondent for the College 7\[eu>s, and 
Helen Cadbury Bush, whose daughter Nancy, 
1940, is Assistant on the Business Board of 
the K[ews. 

A bright'colored postcard from Sarah San' 
borne Weaver, at Donna, Texas, advertises 
Texas grapefruit, and declares: "I'd happily 
donate a ton of grapefruit, if you pay for 
packing and freight." Any bidders? 

At a recent district library meeting in Phik' 
delphia, Anne Walton Pennell, school con' 
sultant and specialist in children's literature, 
presented a list of books qualified for retarded 
young readers. 

Marjorie Young Giffbrd is bursting with 
bright ideas for a 1908 Reunion in 1941. 
Save the date, everybody! 



[20] 






BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



1909 

Class Editor: Anna Elizabeth Harlan 
3 57 Chestnut St., Coatesville, Pa. 

Class Collector: Evelyn Holt Lowry 
(Mrs. Holt Lowry) 

Caroline Kamm McKinnon writes from 
Portland: "How can you expect news from 
a quiet person who runs a house and a gar- 
den, and works on the Board of our local 
Y. W. C. A.? The garden and the Y. W. 
C. A. conflict badly in the spring and summer 
for each could easily absorb all my time, and 
I enjoy both. No 1909 , ers have been in our 
part of the West for several years. I'm hoping 
the San Francisco Fair will attract some of 
them and that they will drop in to see me 
on the way." 

From Frances Browne comes this newsy 
letter: "Things go along much as usual with 
me. Norvelle and I had a fine trip abroad last 
summer. We expect to be in New Canaan this 
summer. Margaret Bontecou Squibb and her 
husband and son live across the street from 
me here in Milton, Massachusetts. She is in 
charge of the Primary School which sends 
children in to my Lower School in Milton 
Academy. It is splendid to have her working 
with me. May Putnam and her Scotch Sheltie 
were parlor boarders at the Squibbs' for sev 
eral weeks. May is now in Waltham and will 
probably go back to Jamestown in April. 
Anne Whitney is living in Milton now, writing 
and doing some health work in the vicinity. 
Margaret gave a luncheon while May was here 
at which Margaret Vickery, Mary Nearing 
Spring, Anne, May and I were present to 
represent 1909. . . . Shirley Putnam O'Hara 
and Eliot and Desmond, their thirteen-year-old 
son, have returned from a few months in 
Honolulu. They saw Hono (Catharine Goodale 
Carter), who was starting on an eight months 1 
trip around the world. Needless to say, they 
enjoyed the Islands. . . . Fanny Barber Berry 
gave a buffet dinner two days before 
Christmas which was much enjoyed by Kath- 
erine Ecob, Evelyn Holt Lowry, Barbara 
Spofford Morgan, Marianne Moore, Nellie 
Shippen and myself." 

1909 members, attention! Please follow the 
examples given above and send in news! 

1910 

Class Editor: Izette Taber de Forest 
(Mrs. Alfred V. de Forest) 
88 Appleton St., Cambridge, Mass. 

Class Collector: Frances Hearne Brown 
(Mrs. Robert B. Brown) 

Catherine Souther Buttrick sends us the fol' 
lowing account of her day: "Get breakfast, 



make beds, sew. Get luncheon, read, walk. 
Back of our house there are fields where wc 
walk, taking the dog. Get dinner, husband 
and sons help make all neat. Afterwards 
movies, or bridge, or a book. Can you make 
a printed paragraph out of it?" 

From Elsie Deems Neilson: "My news is 
what it has been for the last ten years. We 
are growing peaches and almonds, while we 
live happily on a lovely California ranch. 
Nancy, my older daughter, is a junior in 
Stanford University and thinks life is grand. 
Our younger, Caroline, spends half the day at 
school and half on horseback, and thinks life 
is grander! We are hoping at least one of you 
all will come out to our Fair and will see us." 

A serious problem is sent us by Mary Agnes 
Irvine. Can anyone help Mary Ag with ideas 
and suggestions? "What do you think of this 
Phi Beta Kappa propaganda? In the first place, 
since it is not awarded by the faculty, it seems 
to me to have little meaning. And in the sec 
ond place, aren't true scholars above reverting 
to a symbol as the result of their attainment? 
In my experience, in excellent secondary 
schools it has had no value; wouldn't the same 
be true of a first-class college? Those who 
wish it sound pretty insecure. And a little 
gold key won't help them much." Send your 
replies to your Editor to be published in later 
Bulletins. 

Ruth Babcock Deems writes from Minnc 
apolis that she spends a week in New York 
City every two months during the winter as 
a member of the Executive Board of the 
Women's Auxiliary to the National Council 
of the Protestant Episcopal Church. She is 
seeing many old Bryn Mawr friends in the 
East, after her long sojourn in California. 

Elsa Denison Jameson and her husband are 
on a winter vacation, motoring to Arizona 
and back. On their way West they dined in 
Washington with Jane Smith, taking Katrina, 
Elsa's younger daughter, to meet Jane. Katrina 
is a sophomore at Bennington and spending 
her six weeks of winter field work in sociologi' 
cal investigation in Washington. 

1911 

Class Editor: Elizabeth Taylor Russell 
(Mrs. John F. Russell, Jr.) 
1085 Park Ave., New York City 

Class Collector: Anna Stearns 

Helen Parkhurst writes from Cairo: 
"Climbed in terror of my life to the top of 
the Great Pyramid. Am leaving for Alexan- 
dria and fly tomorrow to Basra via Baghdad, 
the next day fly to Karachi, India. All far 
exceeds my wildest dreams." 



[21] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



There are two of our alumnae daughters in 
the Class of 1939 at Bryn Mawr, Gordon 
Grosvenor, an accomplished pianist, the daugh- 
ter of Iola Seeds, and Mary Wood, who is 
business manager of the year book, the daugh- 
ter of Hilpa Schram. 

Margaret Prussing LeVino writes most en- 
tertainingly of her job at M. G. M. She 
reads French and German material. She was 
loaned to Warner Brothers to direct a 
"quickie 1 '' called Society Smugglers and had 
great fun doing this, although she lost ten 
pounds and worked nearly all night for three 
weeks. 

Mary Case Pevear plans a delightful summer 
motoring and camping in California. 

Catherine Delano Grant stopped in New 
York for a few days on her way home from 
a visit with her father in Washington. 

We hear indirectly that Marion Crane Car- 
roll and her husband are having a vacation in 
the United States. 

Ruth Gayler had an exhibition of oils and 
water colors at the Argent Galleries in New 
York. This was a "one-man show" and very 
well reviewed. 

1912 

Class Editor: Margaret Thackray Weems 
(Mrs. Philip Weems) 
9 Southgate Ave., Annapolis, Md. 

Class Collector: Mary Peirce 

1913 

Class Editor: Lucile Shadburn Yow 
(Mrs. Jones Yow) 
385 Lancaster Ave., Haverford, Pa. 

Class Collector: Helen Evans Lewis 
(Mrs. Robert M. Lewis) 

1914 

Class Editor: Evelyn Shaw McCutcheon 
(Mrs. John T. McCutcheon) 
2450 Lakeview Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Class Collector: Mary Christine Smith 

During the spring vacation of Morning Face 
School (Richmond, Massachusetts) Katharine 
Huntington Annin, the Headmistress, visited 
schools in other parts of the country. She 
comments laughingly that the more she visits, 
and the more experience she has in her own 
school, the more conservative she becomes. 
Her husband teaches history, algebra and the 
social sciences at Morning Face. He has a 
fine accredited herd of cows at the farm nearby 
where he and Katharine and the three daugh- 
ters live. The oldest daughter, Edith, who is 
at boarding school near Boston, expects to go 
to Bryn Mawr next fall. 



Mary Woodin Miner is having a busy year. 
In addition to an active interest in the Union 
Settlement, the Turtle Bay Music School and 
the New York City Mission, she spends her 
time trying to keep up with her two children. 
Her daughter, Anne, a graduate of the Brearley 
School, is going to be married this summer; 
and her son Charles, who graduates from the 
Choate School, is defying five generations of 
Yale tradition to go to Princeton this fall. 

Marion Camp Newberry and her husband 
should have reached Italy by now, where one 
of their daughters is in school in Florence. 
We wish we could know what sort of senti- 
ment they ran into in their trip around the 
world, and what feeling they find in England 
as they get home. 

1915 

Class Editor: Margaret L. Free Stone 
(Mrs. James Austin Stone) 
3039 44th St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Class Collector: Mildred Jacobs Coward 
(Mrs. Jacobs Coward) 



1916 

Class Editor: Catherine S. Godley 
2873 Observatory Ave., Hyde Park 
Cincinnati, Ohio 

Class Collector: Helen Robertson 

Eleanor Hill Carpenter has a novel plan 
in mind for next year. She expects to com- 
mute between Downingtown and Rome. Dr. 
Carpenter has been appointed head of the 
Classical School of the American Academy in 
Rome and as Eleanor is afraid their place in 
Downingtown will go to rack and ruin if 
deserted for a year, she has worked out this 
scheme of long-distance commuting. She will 
have two dogs for travelling companions and 
hopes they will enjoy the ocean voyage as 
much as she will. A small villa with a walled 
garden in Rome will furnish a safe haven for 
the dogs while on a foreign shore and Eleanor 
is looking forward to the change of scene this 
arrangement will provide. 

1917 

Class Editor: Bertha C. Greenough 

203 Blackstone Blvd., Providence, R. I. 

Class Collector: Dorothy Shipley White 
(Mrs. Thomas Raeburn White) 

Constance Wilcox Pignatelli has just writ- 
ten a book called Such Ways Are Dangerous, 
which has been reviewed in the Saturday 
Review of Literature (under date of March 
11th). It has to do with Caroline Pringle, 



[22] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



who after twentyfive years of "sedate life in 
Hamscott, Vermont," wakes up one morning 
to find herself in "possession of a house on 
Sutton Place and sharing the garden with two 
strangers and brightly garmented interior 
decorators.'" 

1918 
Class Editor: 

Mary-Safford Mumford Hoogewerff 

(Mrs. Hiester Hoogewerff) 

179 Duke of Gloucester St. 

Annapolis, Md. 

Class Collector: Harriet Hobbs Haines 
(Mrs. W. Howard Haines) 

1919 

Class Editor: Frances Clarke Darling 
(Mrs. H. Maurice Darling) 
12 Lee Place, Bronxville, N. Y, 

Class Collector: 

Mary Thurman Martin, pro tern. 
(Mrs. Milward W. Martin) 



1920 

Class Editor: Teresa James Morris 
(Mrs. Edward K. Morris) 
4950 Hillbrook Lane, Washington, D. C. 

Class Collector: Josephine Herrick 

What a Class! — approaching our twentieth 
Reunion, and now, for the third month, I am 
reporting the birth of a baby to the Class. 
Yes, the Class claims all your children as its 
own. Brian, son of Miriam O'Brien and Rob- 
ert Underhill, was born on February 17th. 
As Miriam says, "This seems to be all the 
news of any importance in this family for 
the moment.'" And yet, in the same family 
is Bobby, Jr., who, according to the Boston 
Evening Transcript of January 11th, "may 
very well have the honour of being Boston's 
youngest skiier." He is "as steady on his skis 
as are most children of his age on their feet. 
Both his mother and father are well known 
as skiiers and mountaineers." 

See you at Reunion, June 3rd! 

1921 

Class Editor: Rebecca S. Marshall 
1013 Poplar Hill Road, 
Baltimore, Md. 

Class Collector: 

Katharine Walker Bradford 
(Mrs. Lindsay Bradford) 

Reunion this year! The Class Dinner is on 
Saturday, June 3rd. Come and see all the 
new buildings on the campus. Come and talk 

[ 23 



about your children or your jobs or both. You 
will all be coming to New York to the World's 
Fair this summer so combine it with Reunion. 
It is a splendid opportunity to come East 
(or North or South, whatever the case may 
be). 

Helen Rice, 1923, who is now Warden of 
Rhoads Hall, sent us an amusing item of news 
which will interest the Class. Quoting from 
her letter: "About your oral song, T can't 
do it all by mythelf. 1 That has made such a 
hit on the campus at the present day that one 
of the German Professors, Dr. Diez, translated 
it into German (lisps and all) and it was 
sung at a perfectly delightful international 
party. The girls who sang it were all dressed 
in Tyrolean costumes and sang it very well, 
and they were quite the hit of the evening." 

The Class Baby has gone to boarding school 
this winter. She is at Shipley. 

1922 

Class Editor: Katherine Peek 

Rosemont College, Rosemont, Pa. 

Class Collector: 

Katherine Stiles Harrington 
(Mrs. Carroll Harrington) 

Serena Hand Savage and Trina Stiles Har- 
rington attended the meetings of the Alumnae 
Council in New Haven, Serena as Chairman 
of the Nominating Committee of the Associa- 
tion and Trina as Councillor-at-Large. While 
in New Haven they were entertained by 
Peggy Kennard, who is Assistant Professor of 
Neuro-Physiology at the Yale School of Medi- 
cine and is engaged in very absorbing research 
in that field. 

Other doctors among our ranks are Sadi 
Baron Raskind, who has two children and is 
a neuro-psychiatrist on the staff of three hos- 
pitals in Long Island City. She reports that 
she meets her husband, Dr. Raskind, "occa- 
sionally, as our paths cross." Katherine 
Haworth Leicester has two sons, aged fifteen 
and eleven, and is practicing internal medicine 
in San Francisco. She is on the staff of the 
University of California Hospital and the 
Children's Hospital. 

The back-to-the-land movement seems to be 
represented by Evelyn Rogers Inkster, who has 
abandoned city life and moved her family to 
their country place at Sandy Hook, Connecti- 
cut. Her daughter, Marjorie Anne, aged nine 
months, is to be nourished on vitamins from 
their own garden. Prue Smith Rockwell has 
two boys, aged eleven and eight, and lives 
part of the time on their farm near Asheville. 
Vinton Liddell Pickens has just returned from 
five months in Arizona to her farm near 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Leesburg, Virginia. Her younger daughter is 
headed for the Shipley School and Bryn 
Mawr, the elder is at the National Cathedral 
School in Washington. 

Other members of 1922 who report them- 
selves modestly as simply "raising families 1 '' are 
Emily Burns Brown, who has three boys, a 
fourth en route, and lives near San Francisco; 
Catherine Rhett Woods, who has a three-year' 
old son and lives in Prince George, British 
Columbia. "E" Williams Clark has a son, ten, 
and a daughter, eight, and lives near Wilkes- 
Barre, where her husband is active in State 
politics. Anita Dunn Carpenter has three 
daughters, the eldest of whom is finishing her 
junior year at Shipley. This summer Anita is 
going to visit her sister, May Morrill Dunn 
von Bergen, in Stockholm. 

Malvina Glasner Bloom, with a daughter 
aged eleven and a son, eight and a half, has 
resumed her education at the Training School 
for Social Work at Indiana University. Her 
husband is President of the Indiana State 
Conference on Social Work this year. 

Frances Label is head of the mathematics 
department in a school at Darby, Pennsylvania, 
and is planning a sabbatical year with travel 
and further study in 1939-1940. Your Editor 
is teaching English Literature at the above 
address, a college founded the year after we 
all graduated! Ray Neel is Headmistress of 
the Shore Country Day School near Boston. 

Liz, Hall is working for the Republican 
County Chairman of New York and National 
Committeeman from New York, "sometimes 
getting hold of fascinating secrets, " which 
ought to become increasingly fascinating as 
1940 approaches. Betty Titcomb is living un- 
eventfully, she claims, at Bloomfield, Connecti- 
cut, and is eager for visits from classmates. 
Cornelia Baird Voorhis has moved to Pelham, 
New York, and Mary Hay Funk went to 
England in September with her husband on 
business. 

Cornelia Otis Skinner has this past winter 
added another chapter to her distinguished 
career. In November she began a cross-coun- 
try tour in her own dramatisation of Margaret 
Ayer Barnes' novel, Edna His Wife, going to 
the Pacific Coast, from Vancouver to San 
Diego, and closing in Los Angeles just before 
Christmas. She had large audiences and a 
most enthusiastic press. Also in November 
was published her latest book, Dithers and 
Jitters, which immediately became a best seller, 
and has held its place in the Herald'Tribune 's 
list since its publication. On January 24th in 
Chicago she made her first appearance as a 
star with full company in Candida, and is at 
present taking this play to many of the large 
Middle Western and Eastern cities. 



1923 

Class Editor: Isabelle Beaudrias Murray 
(Mrs. William D. Murray) 
284 N. Broadway, Yonkers, N. Y. 

Class Collector: Frances Matteson Rathbun 
(Mrs. Lawrance Rathbun) 

1924 

Class Editor: Mary Emily Rodney Brinser 
(Mrs. Donald C. Brinser) 
85 Washington St., East Orange, N. J. 

Class Collector: Molly Angell McAlpin 
(Mrs. William R. McAlpin) 

Have you all any idea how unproductive the 
telephone can be? Those of yojj about New 
York won't seem to admit any personal hap- 
penings of note. Rumors that must be verified 
before publication all seem to refer to people 
who cannot be caught at the other end of a 
telephone bell. Don't be surprised if I resort 
to pulling you out of a sound sleep. The 
middle of the night ought to find someone 
at home. 

Remember my mentioning that Betty Ives 
Bartholet has a new country place? Well, 
Clay and Corrigill were the architects; and 
"Clay" is none other than the husband of 
Lesta Ford Clay. 

Molly Angell McAlpin writes: "This is my 
sixth year in Greenwich. Sylvia, aged ten, 
goes to Rosemary Junior School — college as 
yet undecided. Billy, aged seven, goes to the 
Greenwich Country Day School. Up to now 
I have worked on the boards of the New York 
Henry Street Visiting Nurse Service, the 
Greenwich Children's Center, the Greenwich 
Parents' League, and the Greenwich Maternal 
Health Association. At the moment, however, 
I am taking a year off and indulging in piano 
and tap dancing lessons! (Sounds like great 
fun, doesn't it?) We have bought a farm on 
the Chesapeake near Chestertown, Maryland, 
and are building thereon a Georgian house 
with Southern tendencies. We hope to have 
it finished by summer, and should love to 
show it off to any of 1924 who may be 
motoring nearby." 

Martha Fischer Ells wrote of trying to see 
me during those hectic moments between a 
matinee and a dash for the Six o'Clock. Un- 
fortunately she did not know that we have 
moved our shop. I was particularly disap- 
pointed about not meeting her husband, who 
happened to be with her on that trip. Martha 
said she was looking forward to the Alumnae 
Council meetings in New Haven during 
March. Someone might report on who saw 
whom there. 

Several of you who manage to tell nothing 



[24] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



about yourselves have inquired as to what I 
have been doing. Aside from the general busy 
ness that comes with trying to run smoothly 
the retail and wholesale marketing of Southern 
handicrafts, from pot holders to furniture, and 
all the incidental designing and styling, I am 
at present taking out-of-hour classes in design- 
ing, sketching and painting, and weaving. You 
should see me eyeing hopefully all the corners 
of our three-room apartment and wondering 
where I could put a loom! Weaving is fas- 
cinating. No, I am not neglecting my hus- 
band, because he is doing law four nights a 
week. In the fall we took time out to have 
pneumonia together; in January we jaunted 
off to Florida again for one of the laziest 
vacations ever; at present I am trying to keep 
Don a little sensible about his activities, be- 
cause he has just recovered from an emergency 
appendectomy, in which I did not join him. 
In case some of the rest of you try hurried 
calls while in town, perhaps I had better make 
it easy for you. We — the Southern High- 
landers — are now right at the main entrance 
to Rockefeller Center, on the promenade that 
runs from Fifth Avenue (opposite Saks) down 
to the sunken plaza and the gilded Prometheus. 
Street level, left side. 

1925 

Class Editor: Elizabeth Mallett Conger 
(Mrs. Frederic Conger) 
Dongan Hills, Staten Island, N. Y. 

Class Collector: Allegra Woodworth 

1926 

Class Editor: Janet C. Preston 
Kenwood, Catonsville, Md. 

Class Collector: Mary Tatnall Colby 
(Mrs. I. Gordon Colby) 

The Class sends its sincerest sympathy to 
Molly Parker Milmine, whose father died on 
February 11th. 

Molly finally managed to see Happy Hop- 
kinson in New York "on the verge of the 
gangplank." Happy was just starting over to 
Geneva and the League of Nations, but said 
she would be back in the United States of 
America this summer if there were war. Molly 
also saw Franny Jay "looking very chic," who 
has had to give up photography because her 
eyes couldn't stand peering into the light so 
much. She read in a Boston newspaper that 
Miggy Arnold had gone to Mexico for two 
months to do mountain climbing with the 
Appalachian Mountain Club, and has received 
from Tweedle (Edith Tweddell Barnwell) "a 
beguiling picture of her daughter Diana." 
Molly keeps her finger on more pulses than 
anyone else in the Class. 



If any of you resent that comment, let us 
know your score- 1 — and the news you've picked 
up. 

The Council meeting in New Haven found 
us well represented. Peg Harris West was 
there in her official capacity, the title of which 
we never can remember. Probably it's Chair- 
man of the Finance Committee. Anyway there 
is no doubt about what she does — and what 
she wants us to do. Don't you remember page 
11 of the March Bulletin? It had her beau- 
tiful drawing of the Alumnae Association 
Freight Train — which was a clever and striking 
illustration of the state of the Alumnae Fund 
— and of the alumnae. (Eighty percent of 
them were asleep under a tree. Vas you dere, 
Charlie?) 

Betty Cushman was on hand at Westover 
to help welcome the Council to the luncheon 
meeting there, and she came down to New 
Haven to the dinner for Miss Park. Mary 
Tatnall Colby was there, too. She has been 
located in space at last, you will be glad to 
hear. Her address is Woodbridge, Connecticut. 

Delia Smith Mares, Councillor for District 
VI., made the trip from Saint Louis though 
she has a new son who was then only eight 
weeks old. We send her congratulations from 
the Class and, personally, much gratitude for 
her letter of March 13th. She wrote: 

"We have a second son, born January 8th. 
After considerable delay we named him for 
the two Presidents of his paternal grandparent's 
native Czechoslovakia — Thomas Edward. In 
spite of the demands of an increasing house- 
hold I've managed to do some work for the 
local League of Women Voters in Foreign 
Policy. For about a year now I've been writ- 
ing a weekly radio program for the Saint 
Louis Columbia Station KMOX. It's decep- 
tively called l The Marshall Family,' and is an 
attempt to get across educational ideas and 
events in the form of family conversation." 

One other piece of news from the Saint 
Louis front: Deirdre O'Shea Carr had an 
article in the Saint Louis Diaper Service leaf- 
let. Oh, well, Ogden Nash always warned 
you what awaits the girl that fascinates. 

1927 

Class Editor: Ruth Rickaby Darmstadt 
(Mrs. Louis J. Darmstadt) 
179 East 79th St., New York City 

Class Collector: Dorothy Irwin Headly 
(Mrs. John F. Headly) 

Dorothea Pearce Gustafson's answers to the 
questionnaire arrived the other day. She filled 
in one copy last fall but it was lost in transit. 
Dot lives in Pasadena and about a year ago 
they bought a house roomy enough for the 



[25] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



three children and transient friends. Their 
eldest child, a boy, is eight, and then there 
are twins, a boy and a girl, aged five. Dot is 
a good executive because, besides her house- 
hold responsibilities, she makes time to take a 
course in Psychology, Family Relations, and 
to study the piano. Her committee interests 
include the Episcopal Church Service League 
and the Oxford Group Mothers' 1 Teams. Her 
hobbies are rose bushes and golf. The Gus- 
tafsons are enthusiastic golfers and take a 
golf vacation practically every year at Del 
Monte or Pebble Beach. 

Through Al Matthew Huse, I heard that 
Frances Christie was laid up in a hospital 
because of a back injury. It seems that she 
spent her vacation out West on a ranch last 
summer and hurt her back riding. Not realis- 
ing how serious it was, she did not have it 
treated until she got back home. And since 
then she has had a miserable time. 

Ursula Squier Reimer and I were the only 
members of the Class present at the New 
York Bryn Mawr Club dinner for Miss Park 
although the attendance was larger than ever 
before. Ursula says that Ursula, Jr., the Class 
Baby, is a "swing" enthusiast at the moment. 
When asked where she would like to be taken 
during her spring vacation, she unhesitatingly 
chose Cab Calloway at the Cotton Club! 

1928 
Class Editor: Cornelia B. Rose, Jr. 

2333 South Nash Street, Arlington, Va. 

Class Collector: Mary Hopkinson Gibbon 
(Mrs. John H. Gibbon, Jr.) 

1929 

Class Editor: Juliet Garrett Munroe 
(Mrs. Henry Munroe) 
22 Willett St., Albany, N. Y. 

Class Collector: Nancy Woodward Budlong 
(Mrs. A. L. Budlong) 

1930 

Class Editor: Edith Grant Griffiths 
(Mrs. David Wood Griffiths) 
2010 Wolfe St., Little Rock, Arkansas 

Class Collector: Eleanor Smith Gaud 
(Mrs. William Steen Gaud) 

1931 

Class Editor: Mary Oak ford Slingluff 

(Mrs. Jesse Slingluff, Jr.) 

305 North way, Guilford, Baltimore, Md. 

Class Collector: Lois Thurston 

Frances Robinson's engagement to the Rev- 
erend Alexander L. Chandler has been an- 
nounced. Frances is now the Director of Rc- 

[26 



ligious Education in South Congregational 
Church, Concord, New Hampshire. Mr. 
Chandler is a graduate of the School of Re- 
ligious Education of Boston University and of 
the Andover-Newton Theological Seminary. 
He is now pastor of First Congregational 
Church, Warner, New Hampshire. 

Virginia Smith Lydgate's husband is now 
on the staff of Scribner's Magazine. They are 
living in New York. 

Celia Darlington is Secretary to the Dean 
of Colorado Springs College in Colorado 
Springs, Colorado. She is also getting an 
M.A. in English there, which must result in 
a busy life. 

1932 

Class Editor: Margaret Woods Keith 
(Mrs. E. Gordon Keith) 
Hillside, W. 254th, and Independence Ave. 
New York City 

Class Collector: Ellen Shaw Kesler 
(Mrs. Robert Wilson Kesler) 

Libby Gutmann has her finger in a new pie. 
Under a letterhead imposingly printed "Chil- 
dren's Exhibit, Over River School, Miss Elisa- 
beth Gutmann, Director," she has sent us 
news of her recent adventures: "Just when 
I was completely giving up hope of finding 
the sort of job I wanted, even as a volunteer, 
and was planning to create one to fit my ideas, 
I discovered that the A. A. U. W. here (Nor- 
walk, Connecticut) had everything necessary 
to start a children's museum, everything, that 
is, except someone to do the work. So when 
they found me a willing worker, they turned 
the whole thing over to me. We have been 
given some exhibits, comprising an amazing 
assortment — preserved sea horses and Greek 
dolls, minerals and Indian baskets; we have 
been given the use of a room in one of the 
public schools; the N. Y. A. supplied carpen- 
ters and painters, and various concerns in 
town have donated paint, lumber, and curtain 
material. In the midst of this chaos I have 
been working out, and sometimes even setting 
up, educational exhibits. The children in our 
own building came in to investigate long be- 
fore I was ready to receive them, and their 
interest was so keen that I offered them — the 
invitation was later extended to all the elemen- 
tary school children in Norwalk — study clubs 
for after school. The response was much 
greater than I had expected, and rather more 
than was easy to cope with so early in the 
game. However, there are now meetings of 
stamp, shell, Indian, and tree clubs, each meet- 
ing for one hour a week, after school. The 
work is ever so exciting. I'm always afraid 
that the children will discover my inexpertness 
and lose interest, but so far, though the attend- 

] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



ance has fluctuated from a low of one to a 
high of forty (which I hope won't occur 
again for a while) and down again to an 
average of six or eight, there has been a 
nucleus of faithful children who keep coming 
back. Now comes my reason for writing. I'm 
in terrible need of competent volunteer help- 
ers. There are, I know, lots of Bryn Mawr 
alumnae near by. It occurred to me that per' 
haps if they saw this Children's Exhibit men' 
tioned in the Bulletin, some of them would 
be interested in giving some of their spare 
time. My home telephone is New Canaan 
1100. All this, by the way, has happened 
since the middle of January. 

"As for other news, I spent the summer in 
Italy and Greece collecting material on the 
subject of my Master's thesis: Ancient Masks. 
While out there I took a cruise through the 
Aegean Islands and along the coast of Turkey, 
visiting the principal sites of archaeological 
interest. The cruise was full of alumnae. The 



only other member of 193' 



Betty Barker. 



She is teaching at Germantown Friends. I had 
lunch with Dorothea Perkins one day this fall. 
She has an apartment in Greenwich Village, 
and is busy writing. 

"I finally got my M.A. at Columbia this 
February, having finished the work for it in 
November. I'm living at home this year. The 
oldest son of the family, with which my sister 
lives in New York, has been living with me 
since September, with wife and son. The son 
is just a year old. We did without a maid 
until this job of mine cropped up; now we 
have a woman in twice a week. Otherwise we 
girls share the housework, cooking, and to 
some extent the baby. It's a wonderful ar- 
rangement, and I hope it will long continue. " 

1933 

Class Editor: Margaret Tyler Archer 
(Mrs. John S. B. Archer) 
St. Paul's School, Concord, N. H. 

Class Collector: Mabel Meehan Schlimme 
(Mrs. B. F. Schlimme, Jr.) 

1934 

Class Editor: Carmen Duany 

Hotel Ansonia, 74th and Broadway 
New York, N. Y. 

Class Collector: Katherine L. Fox 

Santiago de Cuba is, as usual, ancient 
(1517), quaint, tropical, dusty, hot, colorful 
and sleepy. Geographically it is unfavorably 
located for the collection of news and bearing 
this in mind, we asked Sallie Jones Sexton to 
be gracious and send us some news of herself, 
an account of her activities since College no 



less, and here is her reply, at once instructive 
and sagacious, as befits our former Editor in 
her mature wisdom! Sally writes: 

"My career since leaving the ivied walls of 
Bryn Mawr can best be described as one of 
Sturm und drang. Coming out as I did (and 
as a matter of pure fact as we all did) from 
a sheltered and quiet contemplative life into a 
world so fraught with problems and so full of 
challenges to the college graduate's intelligence 
and social sensitivity, I decided abruptly to go 
into the Junior League and the horse business. 
As they both require practically the same 
equipment and ability I thought they consti- 
tuted the elements of a nicely balanced life. 

"Being in the horse business is largely a 
question of owning some horses — quality being 
no barrier. Feeling that, as Coxe finds security 
in large casts, so might I find my salvation in 
numbers, I quickly and practically without con' 
sciousness arranged for the privilege of feeding 
and making excuses for seventeen horses. In 
five years that number has been reduced to 
nine, but only through death and in one in- 
stance disappearance. It took me a little time 
and cost me several very embarrassing mo- 
ments before I caught onto the first law of the 
equine trade — never sell a horse, and if this 
cannot be avoided make the best of a difficult 
situation by selling him for less than you paid 
for him, in order to avoid the stigma of com- 
mercialism. In all my relations with horses 
my Bryn Mawr education has been of ines- 
timable assistance. It has enabled me to spell 
the diseases to which my animals have fallen 
prey; it has facilitated the speed with which 
I can subtract in my head from my bank bal- 
ance; it has intensified my natural ability to 
obscure the issue when testifying in my own 
defense in damage suits; and it has clarified 
for me the distinction between doing what is 
expected of you, and — which is preferable — 
only appearing to do so. My four years of 
making time with professors, during hall tea 
the day before exams, have more than ade- 
quately prepared me for the necessity of gain- 
ing the admiration and good will of the judges 
at the pre-show dinner, while the expression 
of injured innocence acquired in my dealings 
with the Dean has made simpler the job of 
disclaiming knowledge of the broken leg of a 
horse recently declared in good health by 
myself. 

"My career in the League has closely par- 
alleled my four years in College. I got in all 
right, but I have had considerable difficulty 
in staying in. I was sent for by the Dean's 
office on one occasion when I was observed 
by the President's mother at a matinee when I 
had been excused from a required meeting 
because it was my day to drive the Red Cross. 



[27] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



It was, but I had neglected to tell them that I 
drove in the morning. That slight misunder- 
standing was the cause of my doing sterling 
work for forty hours on a housing survey! 
Cars are and always will be, I fear, closely 
associated with most of my troubles with em- 
battled authority. But all is forgiven now and 
I am on the committee of the Women's Field 
Army for the Prevention of Cancer, which 
just goes to show that I eventually give up. 

"From the foregoing it is easy to see that 
I owe my present position in life to the fact 
that I majored in History and allied English." 

1935 

Class Editors: Elizabeth Colie 

377 Vose Ave., South Orange, N. J. 

and 
Elizabeth Kent Tarshis 
(Mrs. Lorie Tarshis) 
65 Langdon St., Cambridge, Mass. 

Class Collector: Josephine E. Baker 

An announcement of interest to many other 
alumnae as well as to the members of 1935 is 
that of the engagement of Margaret Simpson 
to Dr. Charles Wendell David, Professor of 
History at Bryn Mawr. Margaret at present is 
with her family in Florida, while Dr. David, 
on leave of absence during the second semes' 
ter, is doing some research at Harvard on 
English pilgrims to Santiago in Spain during 
the Middle Ages. They plan to be married 
toward the end of May, returning to Cam- 
bridge for the summer after a brief trip. 

Another addition to our growing list of off- 
spring — this time one of our few girls — is 
Nancy Brockie Edgar, whose mother is Anne 
Lukens Edgar. The Edgars live at 326 Gerard 
Avenue, Elkins Park, Pennsylvania. 

A fine, long letter from Katherine Kiel 
Luedke will, we hope, induce other for- 
mer members of the Class to write us at 
equal length. She says: "After leaving Bryn 
Mawr I went to Milwaukee Downer College 
and graduated in 193 5. I majored in Latin 
and French with teaching preparation. After 
graduation I worked at the Milwaukee Journal, 
first in the filing department, then in the radio 
office, which was lots of fun and lots of work. 
I quit about a month before I was married, 
which was on April 18, 1936. Ricky (F. 
Richard) arrived on January 30, 1937. Since 
then I have been busy knitting, playing bridge, 
golf and the like. I am writing this among 
noisy surroundings — at a desk in the Chil- 
dren's Hospital Out-Patient ^Department, where 
I am doing some volunteer work for Junior 
League credit." Kay is now Mrs. Frederick 
A. Luedke and lives at 2922 North Hackett 
Avenue, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 



1936 

Class Editor: Barbara L. Cary 
Merion Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Assistant Editor: Elizabeth Bates Carrick 
(Mrs. Alan Carrick) 
129 East 55th St., New York, N. Y. 

Class Collector: Ellen Scattergood Zook 
(Mrs. W. H. Dunwoody Zook) 

1937 

Class Editor: Alice G. King 

61 East 86th St., New York City 

Class Collector: Sarah Ann Fultz 

John Van Reed Lyman was born on March 
14th to Lois Marean (Mrs. Richard Van Reed 
Lyman). The Lymans are moving from Harts- 
dale to Maine as soon as Johnny says he's 
willing to travel. If he's a true son of his 
parents he'll go like a shot if someone tells 
him the sailing and skiing are good. 

Ruth Woodward writes that she has been 
abroad for two years. The summer after 
graduation she took a motor trip through 
Italy, Jugoslavia, Hungary, Austria, and Ger- 
many. The following winter she was on the 
Riviera collecting material for a guide book 
on Romanesque chapels in the vicinity and 
taking her own photographs for it. In the 
spring she cruised to Greece. At Athens, 
where she spent two weeks, she saw Polly 
Cooke (Mrs. George L. Jones, Jr.) and then 
she went on to the archaeological dig at Old 
Corinth and stayed with Do Canaday. The 
summer of 1938 found Woody tackling golf 
very seriously and this activity, combined with 
her other interests, led her back to the Riviera 
to take photographs for Golf Illustrated. She 
is planning a tour of the women's open golf 
tournaments for next summer. 

Emily Johnson has been living in Panama 
since graduation where she says she has learned 
a little Spanish and attempted the rhumba. 
Beirne Jones has been staying with her, and 
Dr. Fenwick stopped for a chat on his way 
to the Lima Conference. Otherwise she feels 
very much cut off from Bryn Mawrtyrs and 
is looking forward to moving to Newport in 
May. And we know a good many people who 
will be glad to hear she is coming within 
reach. 

Helen Harvey is in New York and has 
some interesting irons in the fire, but we've 
promised not to tell until something develops. 
Anne Marbury has been in New York re- 
cently with "the Baby" under her arm, as she 
familiarly refers to the roll of film she's selling 
for the Society for Maternal Welfare. She 
stayed long enough to see every play in town 
and then we woke up one morning and found 



[28] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



her gone. While she was here she enticed 
Gina Walker away from the Yale Library for 
a week'end, and Gina asked us please not to 
Oh-and'Ah over her job because really she 
never sees any boys. 

Jane Simpson is with Doubleday Doran 
learning the publishing business with an eye 
to retiring and moving to Arizona which she 
says is the most wonderful place in the world. 

We've heard indirectly that Tommy Allinson 
has a job in Philadelphia and that B. A. 
Stainton is still at the Fidelity Union in New 
ark. B. A., we are emphatically told by one 
of her friends, is not a clerk or a teller, but a 
Great Big Statistical Woman. 

Don't forget about Reunion. 

1938 

Class Editor: Alison Raymond 

114 E. 40th St., New York, N. Y. 

Class Collector: Dewilda E. Naramore 

Word has been received of the marriage, 
on Sunday, March 19th, of Alice Low. She 
is now to be addressed as Mrs. William Halle 
Lowry. 

Jinny Hessing Proctor is teaching and likes 
it immensely. She is teaching Geometry, 



Latin, and second-year French. Quite a range! 

Esther Hearne went to business school until 
January and now has a job with the Inland 
Steel Company as Assistant Secretary to one 
of the executives. She says she likes to feel 
that she is a "cog in the wheel of a big in- 
dustry."" 

The six months' guarantee of a job that 
Helen Hartman won with Vogue's Prix de 
Paris expired in February. Helen has now 
been advanced, however, to the position of 
Assistant to an Editor. She has been going 
through the rigors of the studio, up to this 
time. 

Last month still another literary honour fell 
to Franny Fox when Samuel French and Com- 
pany bought one of her plays. She and Mar- 
jorie Hartman, who is writing drama for the 
radio, are upholding the honor of Miss 
Latham's playwriting course very successfully. 

Dave Bakewell has joined the other baskers 
in Florida. Debby Hubbard has been there 
all winter, and Julia Grant for a month or two. 

Barbara Longcope has recently announced 
her engagement to William Fenwick Keyser, 
of Baltimore. 

Do not forget that our first Reunion takes 
place this spring. Save the 3rd to the 7th of 
June for Bryn Mawr! 



FORM OF BEQUEST 



I give and bequeath to the Trustees of Bryn Mawr College, a 

Pennsylvania corporation, the sum of 

to be invested at the discretion of the Trustees thereof, and the income 
only therefrom to be appropriated from time to time under such conditions 
as the trustees may determine, toward the payment of the tuition and other 
fees or expenses of undergraduate students at Bryn Mawr College, 
located at Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. Each Scholarship made possible by 
this Fund shall be known as a " Scholarship." 



[29] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



I 



IKECTOMY 



Choate School 

A country school for a limited number of 
girls in a town conveniently near Boston. 
College preparatory and general courses. 
Small classes. Congenial home life. Basket- 
ball, hockey, riding, and tennis. Catalog. 



AUGUSTA CHOATE 



1600 Beacon Street, Brookli 



Mass. 



The Madeira School 

Greenway, Fairfax County, Virginia 
A resident and country day school 
for girls on the Potomac River 
near Washington, D. C. 
150 acres 10 fireproof buildings 

LUCY MADEIRA WING, Headmistress 



Wykeham Rise 

WASHINGTON, CONNECTICUT 
IN THE LITCHFIELD HILLS 

College Preparatory and General Courses 

Special Courses in Art and Music 

Riding, Basketball, and Outdoor Sports 

FANNY E. DAVIES, Headmistress 



BRYN MAWR COLLEGE INN 
TEA ROOM 

Luncheons 40c - 50c - 75c 
Dinners 85c - $1.25 

Meals a la carte and table d'hote 
Daily and Sunday 8:30 A.M. to 7:30 P.M. 

AFTERNOON TEAS 
THE PUBLIC IS INVITED 

MISS SARA DAVIS, Mgr. 
Tel: Bryn Mawr 386 



THE 
SHIPLEY SCHOOL 

BRYN MAWR, PENNSYLVANIA 
Preparatory to 

Bryn Mawr College 



ALICE G. HOWLAND 
ELEANOR O. BROWNELL 



? Principals 



The Ethel Walker School 

SIMSBURY, CONNECTICUT 

Head of School 

ETHEL WALKER SMITH, A.M. 

Bryn Mawr College 

Head Mistress 

CHARLOTTE WELLES SPEER, A.B. 
Vassar College 



Rosemary Hall 

Greenwich, Conn. 
COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

Constance Evers V 

Eugenia Baker Jessup, B.A. , Headmistresses 

Bryn Mawr College ) 

Caroline Ruutz-Rees, Ph.D. ) AJ . 

Mary E. Lowndes, M.A., Litt.D. J Advisers 



ABBOT ACADEMY 

ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 
Orer a century of achievement as its heritage. 
Rich traditions combined with modern methods. 
Thorough college preparatory course; also gen- 
eral course with emphasis on the fine arts. 
Excellent equipment. Beautiful country campus 
twenty-three miles from Boston. All sports. 
MARGUERITE M. HEARSEY, Principal 



THE MARY <♦ WHEELER 
SCHOOL 

Excellent College Preparatory Record and General 
Cultural Course. Leisure for Hobbies. Modem in 
Spirit. Methods and Equipment. Daily Sports on 
170 acre Farm. Country Residence for Yountfer Girls. 
MARY HELENA DEY, M.A., Principal, Providence, R. I. 



Kindly mention Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 







^ 

© 



IKECTOEY 



FERRY HALL 

Junior College: Two years of college work. 
Special courses in Music, Art and Dramatics. 

Preparatory Department: Prepares for 
colleges requiring entrance examinations, 
also, for certificating colleges and universities. 

General and Special Courses. 

Campus on Lake Front — Outdoor Sports — 
Indoor Swimming Pool — Riding 

For catalog address 

ELOISE R. TREMAIN 

LAKE FOREST ILLINOIS 



The Baldwin School 

BRYN MAWR, PENNSYLVANIA 
A Resident and Country Day School for Girls 

Ten Miles from Philadelphia 
-Stone buildings, indoor swimming pool, sports. 
Thorough and modern preparation for all lead- 
ing colleges. Graduates now in over 40 colleges 
and vocational schools. 

ELIZABETH FORREST JOHNSON 

HEAD OF THE SCHOOL 



The Katharine Branson School 

ROSS, CALIFORNIA 
Across the Bay from San Francisco 

A Country School College Preparatory 

Head: 
Katharine Fleming Branson, A.B., Bryn Mawr 



TOW-HEYWOOft 

ESTABLISHED 1865 

Preparatory to the Leading Colleges for Women. 
Also General Course. 

Art and Music. 

Separate Junior School. 

Outdoor Sports. 

One hour from New York 

Address 

MARY ROGERS ROPER, Headmistress 

Box Y, Stamford, Conn. 



MISS BEARD'S jJMMM 
SCHOOL 

Prepares girls for College Board 1 
examinations. General courses in- j 
elude household and fine and j 
applied arts, and music fs-wH Wr' 

Country life and outdoor sports, j H/#i 
Ample grounds near Orange Moun- I 1 | •^^^Kt2 
tains, vnthin fourteen miles of f sjpm* 
New York City. ! | . 1 IralL) 
Lucie C. Beard, Headmistress BgHgnB 
Box 84, Orange, New Jersey \ 





La Loma Feliz 

SANTA BARBARA, CALIFORNIA 

Residential School. Kindergarten through College 
Preparatory, for boys and girls who need especial 
attention or change of environment because of 
physical handicaps. No tuberculous or mentally 
retarded children can be received. 

INA M. RICHTER 

Medical Director and Head Mistress 

B.A. Bryn Mawr, M.D. Johns Hopkins 



A Book of 
Bryn Mawr Pictures 

32 Gravure Reproductions of Photographs by 

IDA W. PRITCHETT, 1914 

"The pictures are extraordinarily fresh and inter' 
esting, the text a golden mean between explanation 
and sentiment, and the form of the book is 
distinguished." President Park. 

Now on Sale at the Alumnae Office for $1.00 

(10 cents extra for postage) 



Approved Penna. Private Business School 

BUSINESS TRAINING 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
AND SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 




for young men and women. 

One, Two and Three Years 
Day and Evening Courses 
8 Weeks Summer Session 



Founded 1865 



PEI RCE SCHOOL 



ine St. West of Broad 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



Kindly mention Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 



& 



All camps listed in this directory are owned, directed or pat- 
ronized by Bryn Mawr Alumnae. Please give them first con- 
sideration when selecting a camp for yourself or your children. 



1 




1896 



BACK LOG CAMP 

SABAEL P. O., NEW YORK 

On Indian Lake in the Adirondack Mountains 
A Camp for Adults and Families 

QUESTIONNAIRE 




1939 



QUES. Where is Indian Lake? 

ANS. About 150 miles from Albany in a real wilderness. 

QUES. Can you drive to it? 

ANS. To the lower end of the Lake; not to the Camp. 

QUES. What do the Campers live in? 

ANS. Mostly in tents very comfortably equipped. There are two cottages. 

QUES. Who goes to the Camp? 

ANS. People like yourself. Single men and women; whole families. 

QUES. Who runs the Camp. 

ANS. A large family of Phila. Quakers, college graduates. 

QUES. What sort of life does the Camp offer? 

ANS. Terribly boring to the sort who rarely come; fascinating to those who 

love the woods. 

QUES. Is the food good? 

ANS. Absolutely. 

Letters of inquiry should be addressed to 

MRS. BERTHA BROWN LAMBERT (Bryn Mawr, 1904) 

272 PARK AVENUE TAKOMA PARK. D. C. 



HIGHFIELDS 

CMP 

A Camp for Girls, 

9-17, 

on Alford Lake, 

East Union, Maine 

• 

Healthful location 

near Maine Coast. 

Junior, 

Intermediate, 

Senior groups. 

Cabins. 

Water sports, hockey, 

tap dancing, tennis, 

trips. 

Studio. 



CATALOGUE 
ALICE NICOLL, A.B. Bryn Mawr College, 1922, Director 

Address: 118 East 93rd Street, New York, New York 




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g CAMP DIRECTORY 1 



CAMP RUNOIA 

BELGRADE LAKES, MAINE 

For Girls 6 to 16 




SAILING • RIDING • GOLF 
Customary Land and Water Sports 

For Information Address 
CONSTANCE DOWD GRANT, 1916 CONSTANCE KELLEN BRANHAM, 1916 

Glendale, Ohio Hingham, Massachusetts 

All Counsellor Positions Have Been Filled 



College Publications — 



Colleges and schools are exacting in the accuracy 
and quality of their printing — and rightly so! The 
printer serving this field must measure up to an 
exceptionally high standard. The John C. Winston 
Company for more than thirty years has served 
the colleges and schools in this section of the 
country so well that many of the first accounts are 
still prominent in the rapidly increasing list. 

This same accuracy and quality extends to the 
printing of catalogs, booklets, folders, private 
editions, etc., handled through the Commercial 
Printing Department. Then, too, the versatility of 
our equipment many times offers a surprising price 
advantage. 

The John C. Winston Co. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



Kindly mention Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 




the catch of the season 
more smoking pleasure 

In every part of the country 
smokers are turning to Chesterfields 
for what they really want in a ciga- 
rette . . . refreshing mildness . . . better taste 
. . . and a more pleasing aroma. 



Copyright 1939, Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 



BRYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 
BULLETIN 




^ Trwasusss 



NEWS OF THE CAMPUS 



June, 1939 



Vol. XIX 



No. 6 



Entered as second-class matter, January 15, IQ21, at the Post Office, Phila., Pa., under Act of March 3, 1S70 

COPYRIGHT. 1939 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



OFFICERS OF THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President. Ida Lauer Darrow, 1921 

Vice-President Yvonne Stoddard Hayes, 1913 

Secretary Dorothea Chambers Blaisdell, 1919 

Treasurer Margaret E. Brusstar, 1903 

Chairman of the Finance Committee Edith Harris Wixst, 1926 

Directors at T are-e \ Gertrude Hearne Myers, 1919 

Directors at Large { Ellenor Morris, 1927 

ALUMNAE SECRETARY, Mildred Buchanan Bassett, 1924 
EDITOR AND BUSINESS MANAGER OF THE BULLETIN 

Marjorie L. Thompson, 1912 

DISTRICT COUNCILLORS 

District I Elizabeth Lawrence Mendell, 1925 

District II Ruth Cheney Streeter, 1918 

District III Mildred Kimball Ruddock, 1936 

District IV Ruth Biddle Penfield, 1 929 

District V Eloise G. ReQua, 1924 

District VI Delia Smith Mares, 1926 

District VII Katharine Collins Hayes, 1929 

ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 
Eleanor Little Aldrich, 1905 Adelaide W. Neall, 1906 

Mary Alden Morgan Lee, 1912 Ethel C. Dunham, 1914 

Eleanor Marquand Forsyth, 1919 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ALUMNAE FUND 
Edith Harris West, 1926 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 
Louise B. Dillingham, 1916 

CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUND COMMITTEE 

Caroline Lynch Byers, 1920 

CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Dr. M. Elizabeth Howe, 1924 

CHAIRMAN OF THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE 
Serena Hand Savage, 1922 



STABLE OF CONTENTS 

Editorial page 1 

The New Addition to the Library, by Lois A. Reed page 2 

What the Addition to the Library Will Mean to the 
Departments of History of Art and Classical 
Archaeology, by Rhys Carpenter page 4 

In Memoriam: Georgiana Goddard King, 

by Katharine B. J\[eilson, 1924 page 6 

Faculty Tribute to Miss King page 7 

The Symposium on Art, by Cleta M. Olmstead page 8 

The Students 1 Contribution to Music on the Campus, 

by Ernest Wi'Houghby page 11 

The Alumnae Bookshelf page 13 

Filippino Lippi, A Critical Study 
By Katharine B. K[eilson, 1924 

Undergraduate Notes, by Emily Cheney, 1940 page 16 

Alumnae Opinion: A Letter to the Editor page 18 

The Bryn Mawr Camp, by Susan G. Miller, 1940 page 19 

May Day Announcements page 20 

News From the Districts page 22 

Class Notes page 23 






Bryn Mawr Alumnae 

Bulletin 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 
THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNA ASSOCIATION 

Marjorie L. Thompson, '12, Editor and Business Manager 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, '05 Denise Gallaudet Francis, '32 

Emily Kimbrough Wrench, '21 Louise Congdon Francis, '00 

Pamela Burr, '28 Barbara L. Cary, *36 

Ida Lauer Darrow, *21, ex-ojfficio 

Subscription Price, $1.50 a Tear Single Copies, 25 Cents 

Checks should be drawn to the order of Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 

Published monthly, except August, September and October, at 1006 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

All material should be sent to the Alumnae Office the first of each month. 



Vol. XIX 



JUNE, 1939 



No. 6 



When the fiscal year of the Association closed on April 30th, it was interesting to 
pause and take stock for a moment of what we actually have accomplished. This is 
not the time to go into figures; the treasurer will do that at the annual meeting to be 
held June 3rd. However, with the May Day announcements that are carried elsewhere 
in this Bulletin, and with the news of the campus, we have in our hands a magic 
wand that enables us to see what our laboriously collected dollars turn into. Let no 
alumna ever say "I am only asked to contribute money." She is asked to contribute to 
the very life-blood of the College, — its faculty and students. The long role of the 
Regional Scholars is always amazing, not because of its length but because of the part 
that those scholars play in the whole life of the College. The significance of the $6,000 
for faculty salaries, contributed through the Alumnae Fund, is not so easy to visualize, 
but President Park in speaking to the alumnae, again and again has said what this gift 
means to the College, — to be able to supplement a salary here and a salary there, to 
strengthen this department or that by making it possible for a distinguished older 
professor or a promising younger one to stay. Over the pedestrian item "Office 
Expenses" we can also wave our wand, and see the friendly interest, the endless hours 
of meticulous work, the pounds of carefully prepared material, the painstaking records, 
that all in the end are transmuted into the living stuff the College is made of. Even 
our contribution to the maintenance of the Deanery indirectly, and not so indirectly 
at that, plays its part. No one who wanders in at eleven o'clock of a morning and sees 
the younger faculty, men and women, sitting in the sunny hall and talking over their 
cups of coffee, or their long luncheon table, with the swift give and take of conversa- 
tion, the graduate students at tea in the afternoon, or the pleasure of the seniors in 
being given the freedom of the gracious house, will feel for an instant that our gift is 
a question of dollars and cents. It means something infinitely precious that only time 
can evaluate. Bulletin costs we hope, too, can be thought of not in terms of printing 
and hours of work, but in terms of strengthening ties between the alumnae as indi- 
viduals, and the alumnae and the College. All this, then, is what our Budget means; 
it is the outward and visible form of a strong feeling that lies deep in each one of us, 
and is simply the means to the end we believe in. 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 

THE NEW ADDITION TO THE LIBRARY 



THE gift of Dr. and Mrs. George H. 
Woodward in 1935 in memory of 
their daughter Quita, with other 
donations by alumnae and friends of the 
College, has made possible the completion 
of the Library building. The addition is 
to be an extension of the north and south 
wings with a recessed central unit con- 
necting them. It is to be known as the 
Quita Woodward Memorial Wing and 
will be so marked with a bronze tablet 
at the entrance. 

The exterior will conform in material 
and design with the older part of the 
building, — a simplified Gothic. The tech- 
nical details are most modern. It has 
been necessary to depart somewhat from 
the older forms in order to comply with 
the recent developments in construction 
and materials now being used. The archi- 
tect's aim has been to adapt the old to 
new uses and modern practices. It has 
taken more than a year's work to arrive 
at a satisfactory layout which it was esti- 
mated could be built for the amount of 
money on hand. Compromises have had 
to be made and readjustments from the 
original plans until a serviceable and eco- 
nomical arrangement was secured. The 
final accepted plans call for a three-story 
structure which will give, however, the 
effect of being only two, and which will 
contain stacks, seminaries, classrooms, and 
offices, with a gallery on the top floor. 

The main entrance will be the old 
closed door, at the end of the present 
south wing, leading into the psychology 
lecture room. This room will be reduced 
in si^e and an appropriate entrance hall, 
with vestibule and steps to the first floor, 
has been designed. On the left as one 
enters will be the Quita Woodward 
Memorial Reading Room of the new 
wing. This will be a large, pleasant room, 



panelled in oak to the ceiling, with re- 
cessed bookcases and a fireplace. It is 
designed to be a place for informal read- 
ing and relaxation. A portrait of Quita 
Woodward, which will hang over the 
fireplace, is being executed by Miss Violet 
Oakley. It is the gift of the Class of 
1932, of which Quita was a member, the 
Class of 1934 and friends. 

Two new doors in the central west sec- 
tion will open into lobbies and stairs lead- 
ing to all floors. The first floor and base- 
ment in this portion of the new building 
will be given over to the book stacks. 
When completely equipped there will be 
three floors providing shelf space for be- 
tween 60,000 and 70,000 volumes. A 
new feature of the stacks will be the 
"carrels," private reading desks, with 
shelf above for books. Provision has been 
made for forty- eight of these carrels along 
the west wall, each one by a window. 
They will be for the use of students or 
members of the faculty engaged in special 
work and can be assigned to individuals 
for a definite period or used by the casual 
student who wishes to consult books from 
the nearby shelves. Within the stack 
space there are two study rooms, one of 
which has been set aside for micropho- 
tography. The photographic reproduction 
of scholarly material is growing in im- 
portance and every well-equipped library 
whose students are doing research, is 
securing microfilms of rare books and 
documents. We have had no place in 
which to use such a machine although it 
has been requested by members of the 
faculty and its introduction is timely. 
The entrance to the stacks will be at the 
south end, near the main entrance through 
a room containing a catalogue of the art 
and archaeology books, with a librarian 
in charge. 



[2] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



The second floor will be occupied by 
the Departments of Archaeology and 
History of Art. There will be seven addi- 
tional offices, two seminar rooms, a large 
lecture room seating fifty students, 
equipped with a projector for showing 
slides, and a smaller lecture room. The 
undergraduate art study will be moved 
to a large, well-lighted room at the south- 
west corner. On the third floor space is 
provided for the storage of the picture 
collection with a long gallery for the dis- 
play and study of the pictures. It is 
planned to move all the books on art, 
archaeology and their allied subjects into 
the new stacks, thus concentrating the 
work of these departments at this end of 
the Library building. 

Some possible changes are contemplated 
in the old building. The rooms vacated 
by archaeology and art will be allotted to 
other departments, thus relieving some- 
what the congestion created by an en- 
larged faculty and student body. At 
some future time cloak rooms are to 
be moved from their present situation at 
the front and located in the basement of 
the new addition. The students 1 cloak 
room will be enlarged and, separated from 
the locker room, there will be a lounge 
for study and relaxation. The women 
faculty and staff will also be provided 
with a rest room which has been urgently 
needed. Many members of the staff live 
at a distance and must stay on the campus 
all day. No provision has ever been made 



for them during the hours they are not 
required to be at their desks, or in case 
of illness. 

The space formerly occupied by the 
cloak rooms will then be used for an en- 
larged reference room. For several years 
it has been impossible to add new books 
to our reference collection without remov- 
ing others. A reference collection should 
grow and become more useful but ours 
has been severely handicapped because 
we have not been able to keep together 
all the books which properly belong in 
such a room. We also hope to provide 
a Treasure Room in the rearrangement 
of the building. In this we will have a 
place to keep and display our valuable 
old books of which we have a fair num- 
ber. At present they are stored in the 
New Book Room closet, a safe place, but 
one where they are hidden from view and 
lose much of their value and usefulness. 
We hope to add to this collection when 
it is known and we can show we have 
adequate space for the proper care of fine 
books. 

Construction will begin early in June 
and it is expected the addition to the 
Library will be finished in the early 
spring of 1940. The faculty, the students 
and the Library staff are looking forward 
with anticipation to the enlarged quarters 
and improved facilities for work which 
the new addition will provide. 

Lois A. Reed, 
College Librarian. 



It was a shock to everyone connected with the College to hear of the death of 
Georgiana Goddard King, member of the Class of 1896 and Professor Emeritus of 
History of Art. She died May 4th in Hollywood, California, where she had made 
her home with her sisters since 1935. In her will Miss King left her large library 
of art books to Bryn Mawr where she had served actively on the faculty for about 
thirty years. The books are all in California where she took them when she retired; 
so it is impossible to make any more detailed statement about them at this time. 



[3] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



WHAT THE ADDITION TO THE LIBRARY WILL 

MEAN TO THE DEPARTMENTS OF HISTORY 

OF ART AND CLASSICAL ARCHAEOLOGY 



THOSE who are familiar with the 
crowded and unworkmanlike condi- 
tions under which the teaching of 
History of Art has always suffered at Bryn 
Mawr will appreciate the sense of relief 
which has greeted the promise of new and 
relatively spacious quarters in the Quita 
Woodward wing of the Library. Instead 
of posting study material for the courses 
in ill-lighted corridors in front of profes- 
sorial offices or seminary rooms, it will 
now be possible to set aside a top floor 
gallery with a series of uniformly illumi- 
nated alcoves. Instead of jamming classes 
totalling nearly a hundred undergraduates 
into a study room capable of seating only 
a fifth of that number around a single 
table, it will now be possible to offer those 
who wish to do their prescribed reading 
a properly equipped, furnished and 
lighted study room. Graduate students 
in Art and Archaeology will have a sepa- 
rate room for their reading and research 
in addition to an adequate seminary room 
in which to meet with their instructors. 
All lectures in Art and Archaeology will 
be transferred from Taylor Hall, thus 
releasing much-needed classroom space 
for other departments. There will be a 
large lecture room on the third floor of 
the new Library wing, capable of holding 
classes up to sixty in number. Lantern 
slides will be projected from a concealed 
stereopticon room in which in addition to 
three projectors there will be file cases 
assembling all the lantern slides in Art 
and Archaeology, which at present are 
inconveniently scattered between a small 
closet room and three professors' studies. 
A smaller lecture room on the same floor 
will be available for the more advanced 



courses with their smaller attendance. 
The Art and Archaeology floor will fur- 
ther include seven faculty offices, prop- 
erly lighted and adequately furnished. 

It will be noticed that the new arrange- 
ment involves a close co-operation between 
the two departments of History of Art 
and Classical Archaeology, amounting to 
a complete pooling of their resources. 
They will share the same lecture rooms, 
reading rooms, and seminaries for their 
undergraduate and graduate work, and 
utilise the same facilities for lantern slides, 
photographs, display rooms, and work 
rooms. Such a co-ordination is dictated 
by the most obvious considerations of 
efficiency and economy. There is, how- 
ever, no intention of merging the two 
departments administratively or of oblit- 
erating their respective identities as 
teaching units on the college curriculum. 

A further innovation which quite acci- 
dentally coincides with the establishment 
of new quarters for the two departments 
is the gradual substitution of kodachrome 
natural color for the defective black-and- 
white of the traditional lantern slide. It 
has for years been an uncomfortable and 
ludicrous paradox that the history of 
painting has had to be taught with the 
elimination of the most significant element 
in the painter's medium of expression — 
his color. Hand-tinted slides have been 
an abomination, less satisfactory even 
than black-and-white. There is hope that 
by 1940 we shall be able to begin acquir- 
ing moderately priced color reproductions 
capable of indefinite magnification with 
absolute chromatic accuracy. The new 
medium is very nearly as important for 
the study of sculpture and architecture 



CO 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



as for painting, since the introduction of 
the correct color values restores the plas- 
tic illusion in a most extraordinary de- 
gree. The equally disastrous paradox that 
the plastic arts have been taught without 
plasticity will thus also be avoided. 

With a new and adequate medium of 
instruction on their horizon, and with the 
prospect of the elimination of every han- 



dicap in the physical conditions, instruc- 
tors and students alike, in the two depart- 
ments of Classical Archaeology and His- 
tory of Art, look forward with undis- 
guised satisfaction to the new and 
abundant life which the Library wing so 
alluringly holds out to them. 

Rhys Carpenter, 
Professor of Classical Archaeology. 



PRESIDENT PARK IN A SPEECH TO THE CLASSICAL 

ASSOCIATION OF THE UNITED STATES PAYS 

HER TRIBUTE TO DR. FRANK 



DR. FRANK saw the study of Latin 
in the College curriculum as a 
lamp unto the feet of modern 
civilization, necessary and fruitful for 
"American students. He drew into his 
department also the contribution not only 
of Greek and the modern descendants of 
Latin, but of history, economics and gov- 
ernment, philosophy, art and archaeology. 
He took enormously wide reading in his 
field for granted; he emphasized the value 
of the Library, and he himself bought 
books with zeal and wisdom. As a good 
teacher in any department does, he 
thought out for his own work the slow 
progress of the student through the cur- 
riculum. He saw the opportunity offered 
to his department in a required course in 
ancient languages, but he was not led 



away by enthusiasm for making the ele- 
mentary course popular and patched with 
purple. The far greater richness of the 
advanced work he emphasized constantly, 
partly because he recognized the difficulty 
an English-speaking student found in 
dealing with a close-packed interwoven 
language such as Latin and the relatively 
late acquirement of ease in the use of 
texts. He believed that the graduate de- 
grees he was responsible for should be 
based on a solid foundation of under- 
graduate work and carefully planned 
courses built around the graduate stu- 
dent's own interests. It was part of our 
advantage that his own interests were so 
varied as to allow for wide variation in 
ours. To all of us alike he was generous 
of help and of his own material. 



THE TENNEY FRANK PRIZE IN CLASSICS 
ESTABLISHED 

' I 'HE Tenney Frank Prize in Classics, given in memory of the great teacher and 
* scholar who was for fifteen years a member of the Department of Latin of Bryn 
Mawr College, is to be awarded from time to time to students of special distinction 
in Classics. It was awarded this year to Helen Hazard Bacon, 1940, whose remarkable 
paper, "Maecenas, Poet and Patron of Poets," shows qualities of insight, imagination 
and sensitive appreciation that are worthy of Tenney Frank's tradition in scholarship. 



m 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 

IN MEMORIAM 
GEORGIANA GODDARD KING 



IN the first quiz I ever took under Miss 
King, the final question read: "In 
what sense is all art a criticism of life?" 

This question offers a clue to her whole 
attitude toward the subject which she 
taught during my student years at Bryn 
Mawr. Reader in English from 1906 to 
1911, Lecturer in Comparative Literature 
from 1912 to 1914, she thereafter gave 
all of her teaching time to History of 
Art, in which she had been lecturing since 
1910. History of Art, not Fine Arts, it 
was called from the time of its organic 
tion as a separate department in 1912, 
under Miss King's headship. This depart- 
ment she built up, almost single-handed, to 
a point at which its standards could bear 
comparison with the best in the country. 
Like Miss Thomas, whom in many respects 
she resembled, she was rigorous in the 
standard of scholarship she set up; and 
she faced the special difficulty of giving 
"art" the scholarly prestige enjoyed by 
accepted research subjects such as Science 
and History. In doing this she made avail- 
able to her students the extraordinary 
riches of her own mind, always exacting 
from them the hard work and independ- 
ent thinking that make seekers and finders 
of truth, not merely passive receivers of 
information garnered by others. 

Agnes Mongan, in her tribute pub- 
lished in the Bulletin of July, 1937, has 
well described the peculiar and unforget- 
table excitement of Miss King's classes. 
To one who has tried teaching, her super- 
human patience, and her ability to stimu- 
late intellectual activity in minds barely 
nascent are even more astonishing than 
they seemed to the sophomore sitting ter- 
rified and humiliated by a lively sense of 
personal inadequacy when confronted by 



the mysteries of Italian Renaissance paint- 
ing. But like the dog Miss King used to 
mention, who found he could climb a tree 
when tree- climbing was the only resource 
in emergency, we sometimes did manage 
to achieve the seemingly impossible, and 
evolve our own ideas about Giotto and 
Ghirlandaio. Part of Miss King's great- 
ness as a teacher — and I have never 
known a greater — lay in this ability to 
make us educate ourselves. 

As she encouraged independent think- 
ing, she insisted on factual accuracy. 
"With all thy wisdom, get understand- 
ing" might well have been writ large over 
the door of Room G in Taylor Hall. 
Moreover she expected clear, logical, and 
cultivated expression in written work. 
Although in my day she was no longer 
officially teaching English composition, 
she never ceased to give her students the 
benefit of her powers as a discerning and 
relentless critic. 

This critical attitude colours all her pub- 
lished work, which contrasts sharply with 
many books in the field of art history. It 
was not enough for her to have her facts; 
they must be so long pondered and so 
well matured in her finely disciplined 
mind that when finally written down they 
would have a quality I once heard de- 
scribed as distilled scholarship. Her richly 
literary, sensitive style, with its love of 
word colour and its occasionally archaistic 
turn of phrase, makes demands of the 
reader, for like the poetry of Browning 
which she admired so much, the content 
is sharply condensed. There is no trace 
of pendantry in it and no suggestion of 
the textbook; she wrote for readers both 
learned and mature. Her great erudition, 
never paraded, gives distinction to every 



C6] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



page of her Mudejar or her Pre-Romari' 
esque Churches of Spain; she could refer 
almost casually to mediaeval philosophy, 
ancient Spanish law, Christian hagiology, 
Oriental thought and custom, Mo^arabic 
ritual, Latin, Greek, and Arabic texts. 
The background of her Kunstgeschichte 
is solid and authentic as it is varied and 
fascinating. 

Spain was, of course, her special prov- 
ince, and her pioneer work in that field 
is of international reputation. She was 
the only woman honored by election to 
membership in two learned Spanish so- 
cieties. American Scholars of the highest 
rank in the field of Spanish art, such as 
Professor Chandler R. Post and the late 
Professor A. Kingsley Porter, of Harvard, 
consulted her and valued her opinion and 
her friendship. The esteem and affection 
in which she was held in Spain itself was 
touching and inspiring; I have seen the 
faces of monks and priests lighting at the 
sight of the copy of Pre-Romanesque 
Churches that was my vade mecum on 
my visits to those beautiful little build- 
ings in the Asturias which are now, all 
too probably, in ruins. 



All of us had hoped that Miss King's 
years of freedom from teaching would 
see the completion of further work she 
had been pursuing. To her studies in 
Spain and Sardinia she had added re- 
search in Portugal, where her capacity 
for brilliant pioneering should have con- 
tributed useful and exciting chapters to 
our knowledge of southern European art. 
Her last years of life were darkened, no 
one knows how heavily, by illness and by 
the tragedy of the Spanish civil war, than 
which nothing, I think, could have caused 
her greater suffering. Yet those who saw 
her during recent months found her as 
indomitable as ever. I am sure she never 
lost faith in the Spanish people whom she 
loved and respected so deeply and under- 
stood so well. To the last, she talked of 
writing "one more book. 11 We who knew 
her as teacher and friend can never be 
sufficiently grateful for the privilege of 
those relationships. And with our per- 
sonal feelings of admiration and love, we 
value what she stood for at College. No 
one who came within the sphere of her 
influence can quite imagine Bryn Mawr 
without it. 

Katharine B. Neilson, 1924. 



FACULTY TRIBUTE TO MISS KING 



WITH the death of Georgiana 
Goddard King has passed one 
of the great figures of Bryn 
Mawr 1 s formative period. Hers was a 
personality to beget tradition and legend; 
and much of that which she created has 
remained the true tradition, the stable 
legend of Bryn Mawr. As a young 
English Reader she immediately began to 
influence her students and contempora- 
ries; as her tastes matured and her incli- 
nations led her out of literature into the 
istory of art, the power of swaying and 



stimulating others steadily strengthened 
and increased. So colorful and so appeal- 
ing was the literary cast of her mind that 
undergraduates did not refer to them- 
selves as majoring in art, but as "taking 
G.G." (as they affectionately called her). 
Nor was this distinction unreal or un- 
vital, since what she taught was not the 
art history of the manuals or the technical 
material of the analyst, but a unique re- 
construction out of the personal world of 
her own emotions and enthusiasms. She 
disliked the merely systematic, the peren- 



[7] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



nial routine of the reiterated text, and in 
consequence never allowed her lectures to 
become repetitious or stereotyped. It was 
this insistence that art should come to the 
undergraduate as a living experience 
which made her a great teacher. 

Her scholarly output was equally un- 
usual and stamped with the same convic- 
tions and capacities. She had no pen 
save that of the stylist and could not im- 
part information untinged by feeling. 
Research was to her a form of literary 
adventure and involved not merely dis- 
covery but also creation. She showed that 
even where scholarship labors directly in 



the service of knowledge, it was possible 
for the form to be as significant as the 
content. Once again, as in her teaching, 
she believed the scholar's function to be 
one of creative reinterpretation, a per- 
sonal revitalisation of all that had lapsed 
into the inanimateness of the past. 

Beside this high quality of her vision 
of the world, her mere record of honors, 
awards, and successes, — notable though 
they were, — is of little moment. She lives 
in those who talked with her and walked 
with her; and these, far better than the 
general world, will know how to appraise 
her and how to mourn her. 



THE SYMPOSIUM ON ART 

SPONSORED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY OF ART 



ART and the aesthetic experience — 
this debatable subject has long had 
*" a strange fascination for the 
learned and the near-learned. College 
students, unwatched by careful professors, 
have allowed their imaginations to roam 
over alluring possibilities. Graduate stu- 
dents with whatever surplus curiosity left 
to them, evince no small amount of inter' 
est. Even their elders, the professors, re- 
leased from the tyranny of exactness de- 
manded in their own scholarly work, like 
to discuss a subject so universal, so elusive, 
where conclusions remain unprovable and 
a matter of personal opinion. 

The first item provided large audiences, 
even for the duration of four weeks; the 
second insured discussions, successful if 
commentators had daring and convictions. 
And because of the third factor a repre- 
sentative of each of four departments 
concerned, History of Art, Archaeology, 
Psychology, and Philosophy, was chosen 
to define and support a point of view 
peculiar to his own department. 



Dr. Richard Bernheimer was the first 
lecturer. Assistant Professor of History 
of Art, he naturally concentrated his 
attention on the visual arts; specialist on 
the great religious art of the Middle Ages, 
he emphasised the importance of repre- 
sentation and the significance of what was 
represented. Through recognisable objects 
and beings, the artist of the Middle Ages 
expressed his religious story and the spec- 
tators understood. Art for him was rep- 
resentative, not abstract and formal; only 
so Bernheimer believes could it have sig- 
nificance, both then and now. Almost 
unchallenged by the following lecturers, 
representative visual arts were accepted as 
a basis, and fewer illustrations were 
selected from the excluded subjects of 
music, architecture, and literature. In his 
second lecture he explained the formulae 
of representational art by which the 
meaning is expressed — sign, image, symbol. 

Dr. Rhys Carpenter, of the Depart- 
ment of Archaeology, also with a histori- 
cal background, outlined another develop- 



[8] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



ment, for whereas Bernheimer had 
stressed the meaning of art, he traced the 
changes in technic. Historically this stylis- 
tic analysis was originated by an observant 
art historian of the eighteenth century, 
but at present it is more particularly an 
archaeological approach. Modern his- 
torians of art wish to go beyond the mere 
technic as Bernheimer did, but classical 
archaeologists are painfully aware that 
they cannot really see Greek originals in 
Roman copies, or know the works of great 
artists through the words of Pliny and 
Pausanias, or correctly restore missing 
heads and arms, or even give a name to 
that art which is preserved. For them it 
is better to be content with the stylistic 
development. 

Carpenter only implied but discussions 
firmly agreed, that unless modern art 
could invent a novelty such as a new 
kind of realism, it will proceed to the 
ultimate step of sophisticated denial of 
technical ability. A classical archaeologist 
by his training cannot differentiate good 
and bad art. Only as the selection has 
been made for him by the world which 
praises that art which has been placed in 
museums, and despises that art which 
hangs on street cars, only this taste is he 
allowed. Perhaps he can venture to sug- 
gest that the great artist is the one who 
exploits to their utmost the potentialities, 
technical and ideal, of his times. 

Thus it would seem that the object 
alone, or those who study it, cannot or 
will not satisfactorily explain why we like 
art. Fortunately the next lectures were 
by the psychologist, whose professional 
business is the study of human reactions. 
Professor Kurt Koffka, of Smith College, 
however, criticized such theories which 
underestimated the importance of the 
object and overexaggerated the ego, such 
theories as empathy. Within the object 
itself, he continued, is something which 



has the power to create in the spectator 
certain reactions, a Requiredness, to use 
Koffka's expression. This word Required- 
ness has been coined to explain the de- 
manding relation between two objects, 
between two egos, or between an object 
and an ego, by Kohle in his fundamental 
book on the Gestalt theory. Koffka as 
an exponent of this theory has applied it 
elsewhere; his lectures at Bryn Mawr 
were the first to introduce it into the 
aesthetic experience. 

The final lectures were presented by 
Professor Nahm of the Philosophy De- 
partment. Disclaiming any intention to 
collect and summarize the results of the 
symposium, his first lecture was a careful 
analysis and criticism of the formal 
theories of art as expressed in Platonic 
and Kantian aesthetics. As Bernheimer 
had rejected abstractionism as too limit- 
ing, so he found pure formalism if applied 
rigidly, narrowing art to a minimum. In 
his second lecture he justified his position 
of the inseparability of form and matter 
in art by explaining that the object is 
material, the process perceptual, and the 
end sensuous. Even super-beings could 
not deal with the non-sensuous. The ex- 
perience of feeling he described as a 
continuum, and in that line he arranged 
instinct at one end, mood at the other 
end, and emotion in the center. In clos- 
ing, Nahm gently reminded his audience 
that perhaps after all the aesthetic reac- 
tion is not a common experience and 
beauty is difficult and rare. He himself 
certainly realized that this rarity of 
beauty was one of his fundamental con- 
tentions against Platonic aesthetics, and 
that a formalist would be interested in 
his lectures but deny that Nahm had been 
discussing Art. 

A few statistics from all four lecturers 
are illuminating. Bernheimer and Car- 
penter used examples from the visual arts, 



[9] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Koffka preferred musical allusions, and 
Nahm literary quotations. The psycholo- 
gist and philosopher were willing to con- 
cede historical changes which art his- 
torians liberally drew upon in the discus- 
sions, and themselves emphasised the in- 
constancy of the aesthetic experience. 
Fundamental concepts were conspicuously 
absent except when insisted upon by the 
questioners. As a whole the object was 
of primary importance, the changing de- 
velopment to which it belonged, sec- 
ondary. These modern theories, it would 
seem, found each individual controlled by 
a significance, a technic, a requiredness, 
outside himself which have reduced his 
own importance from that of a creative 
genius to a cog in the wheel. Even the 
critic who could have foretold each suc- 
ceeding step in the evolution knows he 
owes his scholarly contributions to his 
period. Science is not of individual men 
but of movements; art cannot be made 
explicable by a study of its artists. Each 
of the four speakers represented his own 
department; collectively they represented 
the point of view of our own generation 
of scholars. 

Professor Nahm had refused to con- 
clude with a list of definite results at- 
tained at this symposium on art. But in 
a more subtle manner he had taken note 



of the stammering questions in the pre- 
vious discussions and had answered all 
before they were asked. Bereft of them, 
the questioners might have considered that 
final discussion a failure; actually it was 
proof that the symposium had been a 
great success. A chairman, who would 
have been a welcome addition throughout 
the discussions, could have ended the sym- 
posium with just such an expression of 
completion. Another way of measuring 
the success was the great enthusiasm on 
campus. 

For a month art was a most popular 
topic in dormitories, in seminar rooms and 
at faculty functions. Non-experts would 
agree that each paper was presented 
clearly and concisely enough to be under- 
stood. Experts, here meant as a critical 
fellow in each department, pointed out 
exactly how each lecture, though repre- 
sentative of a professional approach, was 
a new contribution to scholarship. 

The collection of four different points 
of view together gave both lecturer and 
student the working material for formu- 
lating anew his own approach to art. It 
is to be hoped that, in some form or 
other, these eight lectures can be pub- 
lished as important Essays in the study 
of art. 

Cleta M. Olmstead, 
Fellow in Classical Archaeology. 



MATERIAL ASSEMBLED 

A STUDY collection in Prehistoric 
*• *■ European and American Archaeology 
is being assembled for the course in 
Anthropology. The Department of Geol- 
ogy has generously given a fine collection 
of Acheulian hand-axes, and a rich as- 
sortment of implements made by our 
pre-Columbian predecessors in Pennsyl- 
vania. 



BY ANTHROPOLOGISTS 

Loans from the University of Pennsyl- 
vania and a few specimens gathered from 
the Danish shell-heaps by Miss de La- 
guna, show the development of stone 
work in Northern Europe. The history 
of pottery-making in the American South- 
west is enriched by a collection of pottery 
types from the Valley of Mexico, donated 
in part by Mrs. Lincoln Dryden. 



[10] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



THE STUDENTS 1 CONTRIBUTION 
MUSIC ON THE CAMPUS 



TO 



ON entering Bryn Mawr, the first 
connection a student has with 
practical music is her appointment 
for voice test during "Freshman Week." 
This test is necessary in order to divide 
the entire class into the various parts for 
the singing of the Lantern Night Hymn, 
which is the beginning of organised group 
singing for the Freshman Class. The per- 
sonal interview given for the voice test 
also enables one to find out exactly what 
musical experience . a student has had 
(either vocal or instrumental) prior to 
coming to the College, so that this knowl- 
edge may be used to the best advantage 
during her four years here. After these 
initial voice tests, re-trials for Choir 
(sixty members) and Glee Club (eighty 
members) are held to obtain new mem- 
bers for these two organizations which 
are under the direction of the Depart- 
ment of Music. 

Apart from Choir and Glee Club, 
there are numerous smaller singing groups 
on the campus, which show a great inter- 
est in music, so that "Music on the Cam- 
pus" is becoming more and more alive 
by the continued enthusiasm of the stu- 
dents to make music among themselves. 

In 1928 at the dedication of Goodhart 
Hall the Choir and Glee Club sang with 
the Philadelphia Orchestra under the 
direction of Leopold Stokowski, but it 
was not until 1932 that the Choir ap- 
peared in any work outside the College. 
Breaking away from the usual routine of 
singing only at Sunday evening chapel 
services, they broadcasted in a series of 
concerts given weekly by the seven East- 
ern women's colleges, which proved to 
be the nucleus for a wider and more 
varied program of work in the future. 
Other broadcasts followed; the Choir 

[ 



took part with the Philadelphia Orchestra 
in the Academy of Music on several occa- 
sions when choral groups were needed; 
and groups of members brought music 
into various functions connected with the 
College, thus creating more interest and 
gradually weaving the Choir into the gen- 
eral college life. In this year, too, the 
Choir sang all the musical examples to 
illustrate the lectures on "Nationalism in 
Music 11 given by the Flexner Lecturer for 
that year, Dr. Ralph Vaughan Williams. 

The Glee Club came under the super- 
vision of the Department of Music in 
1922, and since that year has given pro- 
ductions of The Mi\ado, Pirates of Pen- 
zance, Patience, and The Gondoliers each 
spring. Apart from the actual singing 
membership of approximately eighty, 
there are about twenty others connected 
with scenery, costumes, lighting, make-up, 
etc. For these productions a professional 
orchestra has always been engaged, but 
for the remainder of the work entailed, 
we are always proud to be able to say 
that it is entirely a "campus production. 11 

In 1935 Choir activities spread further 
afield when we combined with another 
college, namely Princeton, to do Handel's 
Messiah (complete) , with the assistance of 
thirty-six members of the Philadelphia 
Orchestra. The performance was given at 
Princeton on December 1 5th and repeated 
at Bryn Mawr the following day. During 
this same year the choirs of the College 
and the Church of the Good Shepherd, 
Rosemont, sang full Evensong in that 
church, with a program of sacred music 
by the College Choir. A continuation of 
these performances with outside choirs has 
been possible since I have been Organist 
and Director of the choir at the Church of 
the Redeemer, Bryn Mawr, and for the 

11] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



past two years we have given a Christmas 
Carol Service in Goodhart Hall, with a 
reciprocal service in the church during 
the second semester. 

With the addition of men's voices thus 
rendered possible, there has been an excel' 
lent opportunity to do some of the larger 
choral works which could not have been 
undertaken without the assistance of tenor 
and bass voices. This has given the stu- 
dents a new outlook and an education in 
different types of music which could not 
be obtained by the continual use of music 
arranged for women's voices. 

I have spoken mainly about the or- 
ganised choral groups of the College, but 
from these groups have sprung many 
others which have been managed by the 
students themselves. One of the most 
beautiful ceremonies of the year is the 
carol singing around the campus on the 
night before Christmas vacation com- 
mences. This is done by the regular choir 
members, under the leadership of the 
Choir Manager. In various classes, sing- 
ing is conducted under the supervision 
of a Senior Song Mistress; and the Ger- 
man Club has also organised a singing 
group for folk songs, etc. There may be 
others of a similar nature which have not 
been brought to my notice. 

It is very encouraging to see the re- 
newed interest in instrumental music 
which has been stimulated through the 
wonderful co-operation of Helen Rice, 
1923. She has now under her direction 
fourteen string players and two flutes; 
with five pianists at her disposal; and 
another group of five recorders. These 
players have already contributed largely 
to the musical life of the College, in play- 
ing for several informal concerts in 
Rhoads Hall, and giving a special concert 
for the benefit of the Bryn Mawr League. 
During the second semester, quartets of 
Haydn, Mosart and Beethoven have been 



played by Miss Rice and three other 
members of the instrumental group, at the 
classes of History and Appreciation of 
Music. 

It is possible that the Choir will com- 
bine with the Princeton Chapel Choir in a 
joint concert to be given at Princeton and 
Bryn Mawr as before, probably some time 
in December. A new Director of Choral 
Music, Mr. Lindsay A. Lafford, F.R.C.O., 
has been appointed at Haverford College, 
which will open new channels and afford 
a splendid opportunity for Bryn Mawr to 
do much more choral work with men's 
voices, owing to the facilities for rehearsals 
offered by working with an adjacent col- 
lege. For the Christmas Carol Service, 
we hope to have the combined choirs of 
Haverford, the Church of the Redeemer, 
and Bryn Mawr College, with the assist- 
ance of instrumentalists from Haverford 
and Bryn Mawr. Another concert by 
these two colleges will probably be given 
in the early spring, if rehearsals can be 
arranged during this busy time of year. 

There are many opportunities for all 
musically inclined students entering Bryn 
Mawr. Miss Helen Rice has been ap- 
pointed "Leader of Chamber Music" in 
connection with the Department of Music, 
so that any instrumentalist coming to Bryn 
Mawr in the future will have plenty of 
scope to go forward with her work. 

The students' contribution to music on 
the campus only goes to show how inter- 
ested they are in the musical life of the 
College. However small their part may 
be, they are doing a great work. The 
Department of Music will gladly co-oper- 
ate with the students at all times, in giv- 
ing assistance or advice in any project 
they wish to put forward for the further- 
ing of "Music on the Campus." 

Ernest Willoughby, 
Director of Choir and Glee Club, 
Assistant Professor, Department of Music 



C 12] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



THE ALUMNAE BOOKSHELF 



FILIPPINO LIPPI, A Critical Study. 
By Katharine B. K[eilson. Xiv + 235 
pp. + 114 illustrations. Harvard Uni- 
versity Press, Cambridge, Massachu- 
setts, 1938. $7.50. 

NOT long ago the author of Filip- 
pino Lippi and I exchanged com- 
ment on the curious circumstance 
that, although we were disciples of the 
same ateliers, she was attracted to an ex- 
quisite painter recognized as the inter- 
preter of the feminine emotions of the 
Renaissance in Italy and I to a rugged 
artist who expressed the masculine pas- 
sion of the Baroque in Spain. Long asso- 
ciation with the latter gave me cause to 
question, while I awaited the new intro- 
duction to Filippino, whether I should 
enjoy his gentle company. But the oppor- 
tunity to review a splendid product of a 
fellow-pupil proves irresistible, especially 
since the author proudly boasts the same 
debt as do I, to the maestra, the late 
Georgiana Goddard King, and to the gen- 
erous amichi di bottega, Professors Post 
and Sachs and the late Arthur Kingsley 
Porter of Harvard and Professor Kennedy 
of Smith. Likewise the author's enter- 
prise — that of introducing a painter, once 
renowned, to those who should know 
him — presents problems that I regard with 
sympathetic interest. Similar concern with 
matters of documentation and of the 
product of the artist's workshop there- 
fore encourages me to comment when I 
find that my own experience supports or 
modifies Miss Neilson's conclusions; yet 
I speak, not as a specialist in the field 
who voices his opinion in the professional 
journals, but with the light repartee of 
the alunna di bottega. 

Considering first the debatable bio- 
graphical problems whereof Miss Neilson 



states her own opinions but acknowledges 
the admissibility of argument, I find noth- 
ing incredible in the assumption that 
Filippino, at the tender age of ten, was 
sufficiently responsible to receive pay- 
ments due to his father, for Spanish 
mozos were almost equally reliable even 
when they acted for masters who were 
not of their kin. Neither is there any- 
thing improbable in the evidence that 
Filippino took his place in the workshop 
of Botticelli when he was scarcely thir- 
teen, for, in cities where the guild system 
prevailed, painters 1 apprentices were cus- 
tomarily articled at twelve or less. Thus 
it was with the sons of Espinosa in 
Valencia and with innumerable others. 
On the other hand, the assumption that 
Filippino executed the Budapest Madonna 
at the age of sixteen is more difficult, for, 
in my experience at least, the matricula- 
tion piece— usually the earliest in which 
a personal style can be recognized — was 
normally painted in the eighteenth year. 
My preference for a slightly later date 
affects not at all the subsequent chronol- 
ogy, for I believe it entirely reasonable 
to crowd the later 147CTs with works 
accomplished in rapid succession and with 
sudden growth in competence. 

I admire Miss Neilson's willingness to 
chide the artist whom she sponsors for 
what she considers his moral and aesthetic 
deficiencies; yet, being disinterested, I 
should be more lenient; certainly Filippino 
cannot be blamed for accepting commis- 
sions he had no time to carry out, for he 
dealt on a producers' market and prac- 
ticed at a time when it was the custom of 
artists to seize every opportunity offered 
and to let the patrons wait. And I do 
not censure him for misplaced dramatic 
emphasis in the Martyrdom of St. Philip, 
for, if he had sought to fix the specta- 



[13] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



tor's interest in the tragedy, he might 
have produced a painting easily mis- 
takable for the Crucifixion of Christ and 
thus he would have committed a sacrilege. 
A Quattrocento Florentine of Pacheco's 
bent (there must have been such pedants 
even though they did not publish) would 
have been scrupulous on this point. 

The Corsini tondo and its rectangular 
counterpart in the New York Historical 
Society clearly offer one of the most in- 
triguing problems in the entire critique of 
Filippino and Amico di Sandro. As the 
author shows, Berenson, starting from the 
two premises (1) that the New York panel 
is Amico 's and (2) that it is Filippino's, 
arrived at the conclusion that Amico and 
Filippino were a single identity. Miss 
Neilson believes that both the conclusion 
and the first premise are false. But is it 
not possible that the second is really the 
erroneous premise? I feel that her own 
discussion of the New York panel pre- 
pares the ground for this opinion, and 
that perhaps the mystical gravity which 
she considers alien to Amico might well 
have been a virtue assumed here for the 
sake of the formal devotional theme. Can 
this unaccustomed but explainable grav- 
ity outweigh all the evidence for Amico — 
the long neck, the small hands and feet, 
the lightly poised figures, the less com- 
petent rendering of perspective? How- 
ever we regard this attribution, we owe 
to Miss Neilson the most discriminating 
catalogue of Amico's work that has yet 
been made and the almost conclusive 
proof that Amico was the artist who 
contributed most to the formation of 
Filippino's early style. One might well 
remark here that the discrepancy in size 
of the hands painted by the young Filip- 
pino and by Amico is evidence for, rather 
than against, the relationship; a good 
pupil often over-corrects his teacher's 
most noticeable defect. 



Delicate matters of attribution open a 
field where the inexpert student is 
tempted to joust with the critic; the for- 
mer usually wishes to defend the legiti- 
macy of products which the critic cannot 
honor with the artist's name. Hence it is 
not surprising that I should like to recog- 
nize as Filippino's own the Ferroni 
Madonna and the Metropolitan Museum 
Holy Family. Miss Neilson aptly juxta- 
poses the Madonna to a comparable work 
of the student years — 1477-78 — when the 
twenty-year-old Lippi can scarcely have 
had any matured disciple of his own; 
later, speaking of another work, she says 
that "no admirer of Filippino's would 
have copied his style of the 80's after his 
return from Rome' 1 in the early 90's. Imi- 
tation of the style of the 70's seems to 
me even less probable. The only alterna- 
tive to attribution to Filippino is, I think, 
attribution to another disciple of Amico, 
singularly like Filippino and as ready as 
was he, when he painted the Corsini 
tondo, to experiment with a direct bor- 
rowing from Verrocchio. The "out-of- 
proportion head of the little Baptist," 
which appears also in the Christ of the 
Metropolitan Holy Family, seems a char- 
acteristic Lippesque trait, unlikely to sur- 
vive in a follower, especially in a Cinque 
cento follower. Therefore I should place 
the Metropolitan painting in the 1480's 
when the small belted waist and the slit 
and buttoned sleeves — details of fashion 
dear to Ghirlandaio and Mino da Fiesole 
— were still a la mode. Of this Holy 
Family one would like to know more: 
whence it came to the Altman Collection, 
whether the angel is correctly so-called, 
whether the letters on his halo are still 
legible, how they identify him. It occurs 
to me that he has no visible wings, that 
what he wears might be a deacon's dal- 
matic, and what he carries a humeral 
veil. His crown, which the Greeks would 






[14] 






BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



have called Stephanos, might be the 
symbol of St. Stephen, whose face, ac- 
cording to the Acts, vi., 15, was the face 
of an angel. And now after one more 
suggestion — that St. Stephen was the 
patron of Matthias Corvinus 1 capital, 
Vienna — I confess that I have been guess- 
ing, perhaps injudiciously. I feel, how- 
ever, that it is not too rash to call atten- 
tion to Morellian details, such as high- 
lights painted al tocco on babies' noses, the 
double curve of the contour of hands, the 
method of indicating diaphanous stuff, 
and the general similarity of types, that 
associate this work with the precious Holy 
Family of Edinburgh which did indeed 
come from Austria-Hungary. I presume 
that, unless cleaning agents account for 
the discrepancy in color, the apparent 
. variations of the palette will not permit 
the hypothesis that the little picture 
served as a predella for the other. Yet I 
would not date the Edinburgh work at a 
time when Filippino had supposedly be- 
come altogether independent of his 
father, for one of the attendant angels 
owes too much to the dancing Salome of 
Prato. Neither do I think that this was 
the painting which, according to Vasari, 
was made for Pugliese, for, unless the 
artist intended and critics agree that it is 
specifically a "Rest on the Flight into 
Egypt, 11 it cannot appropriately be de- 
scribed as una storia — a narrative piece. 
Very apt, I think, is the point that 



Filippino did not terminate an epoch but 
exerted posthumous influence on the 
Cinquecento and even helped to formu- 
late the Seicento. Certainly Alonso 
Berruguete, Becerra, and Ribalta would 
have admired the St. Jerome in Penitence, 
and the Caracci, the Minerva frescos. 
Perhaps Filippino provided the torturer 
and the bored officer who enter — or re- 
enter — Spanish scenes of martyrdom with 
a new introduction by Zuccaro and Car- 
ducci. I cannot but think that these and 
'perhaps also the Spaniard Pacheco may 
have found Filippino a worthy model. 

The twentieth century student will find 
Filippino Lippi a thoroughly stimulating 
critical study. He will sometimes wish 
that the budget had permitted the full 
corpus of illustrations that Miss Neilson 
intended to give him. He will find evi- 
dence of her good intention in the fact 
that more than once she refers to a work 
as if it were illustrated though, in fact, it 
is not. But he will leave his comfortable 
armchair and search through his books 
and his photograph collection, the better 
to make comparison with some picture 
that is not reproduced. This he does be- 
cause the author subtly compels him to 
follow her discussion which, however 
complicated, still induces pursuit. The 
alunna di bottega glows with pride that 
the workshop which flourished in a calmer 
decade still continues to function. 

Delphine Fitz Darby, 1923. 



The National University Extension Association at its meeting in Berkeley, 
California, Friday, June 23rd, will broadcast through the N. B. C. network an 
address on "Adult Education and the State," by Robert Gordon Sproul, President 
of the University of California. It is an effort to demonstrate a type of adult 
education on a nation-wide basis, and everywhere graduates of both men's and 
women's colleges are urged to listen in. The broadcast will be from 9.45-10.00 
P. M., Eastern Standard time. 



[15] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



UNDERGRADUATE NOTES 

By EMILY CHENEY, 1940 



DELAYED action on spring this 
year perhaps accounts for the out' 
bursts of spring fever which have 
swept Bryn Mawr on the few warm days. 
Foiled in their usual routine program of 
shorts, cigarettes— and, on the side, 
study — in the cloisters, tan-conscious 
undergraduates have sought out new 
places for more intensive sunning. Of 
these, the balconies (an architect might 
say gutters) along the east side of Rhoads 
have been particularly favored for sun- 
ning and deliberation with the morning 
paper, providing as they do a view of 
Taylor Clock and the peopled thorough' 
fare to the Library. By afternoon, the 
Rhoads terrace becomes the basking cen- 
ter, and it is rumored that after-dinner 
coffee may be served there soon. To 
avoid concentrating on Rhoads, we might 
mention that the game of inveigling one's 
professor to hold class in senior row 
goes on as usual. 

Proving that even the aegis of May 
Day cannot assure good weather, the 
dancing on the green had to be postponed 
till May 2nd because of rain and wind. 
In chapel, held May 1st, however, Miss 
Park announced the award of the Hinch' 
man Scholarship for distinction in the 
major field to Louise Morley, 1940, who 
is studying international relations in 
Geneva this year. The Brooke Hall 
Scholarship for the junior with the high' 
est average went to Marie Wurster, a 
mathematics major. 

The spring of 1939 has also brought 
with it discussion of 1940: Big May 
Day — to be or not to be. The abolition 
of early morning chapels in favor of a 
series of mid-morning assemblies provided 
a suitable hour for the whole College to 
meet and discuss the problem of Big May 

[ 



Day. Three speakers presented different 
aspects: Rosamond Cross, 1929, spoke 
as an alumna; Eleanor Taft, 1939, 
President of the Undergraduate Associa' 
tion, described the work that went into 
creating the pageant, and Margaret Otis, 
1939, gave her own impressions of the 
fun and work involved in last May Day. 

Those in favor of May Day 1940 are 
many, and their ranks were swelled after 
the showing of moving pictures of last 
May Day. This group stress the im' 
pressiveness of the pageant and the ex' 
hilaration to be gained from having the 
whole College pour its collective energy 
into a single, grand project. The number 
of those in opposition is as yet uncer' 
tain. Their opinions have been reprc 
sented in a letter to the 7<[ews objecting 
to the curtailment of extra-curricular ac- 
tivities, such as the Players' Club, the 
political groups, and the Lantern, which 
a Big May Day might involve. Others 
murmur about the lack of originality and 
the routineness of the dancing on The 
Green, which they foresee in the pageant. 
A preliminary discussion and vote is to be 
taken in the halls this spring, and a final 
vote next fall as to whether or not Big 
May Day shall be held in 1940. 

Other morning assemblies have in- 
cluded the Graduate Day announcements, 
the Peace Meeting, and the May Day 
announcements of undergraduate scholar' 
ships and prises. Next year it is planned 
to provide a varied and balanced series 
of meetings for official announcements 
and others for general discussions in 
which the students can take part. As one 
of the latter, a debate on curriculum 
problems has been suggested. 

Repeating the experiment in co'opera' 
tive lectures, started in 1937 with the 



16] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



series on Man, a symposium of eight lec- 
tures on Art was shared in this April 
by the Art, Archaeology, Philosophy, and 
Psychology Departments. While the 
symposium did not draw the large audi' 
ence that some of the outside entertain- 
ments do, the smaller group which came 
appeared regularly and contributed addi- 
tional points of view and questions in the 
Common Room discussions which fol- 
lowed each lecture. The series succeeded 
in giving what no regular course can — 
a focused view of a single subject from 
distinct, but inter-related, aspects. 

With hopes of a Theatre Workshop 
next fall, the Players 1 Club has redoubled 
its efforts in a series of short benefit plays. 
Riders to the Sea and The l^ew School 
for Wives were presented in one eve- 
ning, and after spring vacation, the stage 
was thrown open to all comers in an 



authentic Amateur K[ight, with Miss 
Henderson representing Major Bowes. 
Fifty students participated and were re 
warded with almost as many prizes. As 
the final production before examinations 
the Players 1 Club is to present Hiawatha 
Pullman, by Thornton Wilder. 

The Glee Club Gilbert and Sullivan— 
The Gondoliers — was generally agreed to 
be the best production in several years. 
With the direction of Mr. Pacey Ripple, 
of the Savoy Opera Company, and pro- 
vided with an operetta excellently suited 
to women's voices, the Glee Club pro- 
duced skilled leads and a chorus which 
was heavily encored for its rhythmically 
gay rendition of the Cachuca. Perhaps 
the explanation of the operetta's success 
can be traced to the perennial charm of 
the music, the light, colorful costumes and 
the unusually good solos. 



PRAISE OF DR. FENWICITS TESTIMONY BEFORE 
THE FOREIGN RELATIONS COMMITTEE 



ESTHER CAUKIN BRUNAUER, 
Associate in International Educa- 
tion, of the American Association 
of University Women, wrote to President 
Park: 

"After listening two mornings to Dr. 
Fenwick's testimony before the Foreign 
Relations Committee of the Senate I can' 
not resist writing to tell you how fortu- 
nate you are to have such a man on your 
faculty — as though you were not already 
thoroughly aware of the fact. His bril- 



liance of mind and personal sincerity, to- 
gether with a real genius for teaching, 
made his appearance before the Foreign 
Relations Committee a thoroughly satis- 
factory performance. His discussions with 
Senator Johnson and Senator Borah were 
especially noteworthy. One could see 
from the audience that he had not only 
won their respect but that he had also 
won respect for his cause and that, of 
course, is a great achievement with such 
men. 11 



ERRATUM: A misplaced line in the College Calendar in the May issue of the 
Bulletin gave the impression that there would be a charge for tickets to Baccalaureate. 
This will of course not be the case. 



[17] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



ALUMNAE OPINION 



To the Editor, 

Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin. 

AS summer approaches, those of us 
who have followed with interest 
* the development of the Summer 
School realise what a big gap is left on 
the campus by the departure of the 
School. We heartily concur in the state' 
ment of the Executive Committee of the 
College, recorded in the February issue 
of the Bulletin, that Bryn Mawr has 
gained much in the many years of asso- 
ciation with the School, and we feel that 
every effort should be made to replace 
this important factor in the life of the 
College. 

In laying down the criteria which we 
would like to suggest for a new project 
to occupy the Bryn Mawr campus in the 
summer months, it is well to bear in mind 
the remarks made by Miss Jean Carter, 
Director of the Bryn Mawr Summer 
School, in the March issue of the Bul- 
letin, where she points out the value of 
the Bryn Mawr campus to the School in 
its formative years. Having had its first 
child come of age and go out into the 
world, the College, it seems to us, should 
now resume its parental activities and 
give to a new project a firm foundation 
from which it can, in turn, develop. 

We are aware that with the growing 
suburbs around Philadelphia, Bryn Mawr 
is perhaps less suited to a regular Summer 
School than it was in the summer of 1921. 
Therefore, in keeping with the change in 
environment, we are inclined to suggest 
a non-residential school, providing courses 
for the people who live and work in the 
Main Line communities. It would seem 
advisable to maintain a fixed ratio be- 
tween industrial and white collar work- 
ers, as each group has much to contribute 



to the other in joint study of the social 
scene. 

Specifically, the program we would 
suggest may be divided into three parts: 
Academically, the curriculum would in- 
clude English and Public Speaking, Eco- 
nomics, Current Events, American His- 
tory, Popular Science and Civics. Sec- 
ondly, in the line of physical education, 
we would advocate a program that would 
combine athletics with instruction in 
hygiene and in public health. Thirdly, 
we feel that dramatic, musical and artistic 
interests should be encouraged by in- 
formal theatricals and by providing 
facilities for music and art. 

That Bryn Mawr should have some 
sort of a project on its campus in the 
summer months, we are certain that 
everyone will agree. Other colleges have 
developed very useful and interesting 
projects during the summer period. 
However, too often these undertakings 
have reached the same part of the Ameri- 
can community that is reached in the 
winter sessions. We are convinced that 
there is a large group in the immediate 
vicinity, Bryn Mawr and elsewhere, which 
would eagerly take advantage of such an 
opportunity for afternoon and evening 
classes in the summer months, if they 
were available. The response might be 
such that a nominal fee could be charged. 
Such a program might, moreover, bear a 
close relation to the undergraduate winter 
activities. The connection between the 
Industrial Group Discussions under the 
auspices of the Bryn Mawr League and 
the Summer School — however indirect — 
might be duplicated in the new project 
by some relationship to the winter activ- 
ity of the Maids 1 Classes. 

If our memory serves us right, Vera 
Micheles Dean, Research Director of the 



18} 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Foreign Policy Association, in addressing 
a large meeting of the Seven Women's 
Colleges at the Hotel Statler in Boston 
last January, remarked in closing that 
democracy would be saved not by its 
scholars and technicians, but by its rank 
and file. The truth of this hypothesis 
seems to us to be very cogent. A vital 



project to succeed the Summer School on 
the campus is needed as Bryn Mawr's 
new contribution to making democracy 
work — an ideal arising from Miss 
Thomas's vision and one which Miss 
Park's wise counsel has not allowed to 
grow dim. 

Harriet L. Moore, 1932. 

Eleanor B. Fabyan, 1936. 



THE BRYN MAWR CAMP 



FOR the alumnae who have wondered 
about the fate of Bates House, may 
we say that it is now known as the 
Bryn Mawr Camp. We rent a house in 
Stone Harbor, New Jersey, every summer 
where we take twenty Philadelphia and 
Main Line boys and girls from four to 
eight years old and give them two weeks 
at the seashore. During the camp season, 
which starts just after Commencement, 
we have three such groups, with a day 
for cleaning up between them. 

We spend a good part of our days on 
the beach, building castles, digging holes 
and jumping the waves. We also do craft 
work — clay modelling, making shell ani- 
mals, weaving hammocks and, most ex- 
citing of all, giving puppet shows with 
puppets made by the children. Last sum- 
mer "Snow White," "The Three Little 
Pigs" and "The Twelve Dancing Prin- 
cesses" were among our most successful 
theatrical attempts, which were skilfully 
directed by a trained kindergarten work- 
er who took charge of all our craft work. 
Games and free play in the yard, stories 
and singing at our evening assemblies and 
as much eating and sleeping as possible 
take up the rest of our time. As a result 
it is hard to realize that the pale, quiet 
little boy who came to camp is the same 
lively child who jumps into the bus to go 
home, bounces down on a seat and bends 



his tanned face proudly over the top of 
his bag full of craft work to make sure 
that his raffia belt for mother is still there. 

We are constantly entertained by the 
children's amusing remarks. For instance, 
one day when there was fish for lunch 
one youngster announced, "Teacher, I've 
got a splinter in my fish." 

Another time when asked whether he 
knew what a magician was, a little boy 
replied: "Sure! He's the fella what plays 
the violin." 

We are financed by the League Drive, 
sandwich selling on week-day nights all 
winter, and square dances that we run. 
This year, aided by four camp children 
from the neighborhood, we made a spe- 
cial appeal for twenty enamel cups, as our 
present ones are aluminum, banged out of 
shape and very old. We were over- 
whelmed to receive pledges for two hun- 
dred and twenty-four cups, and are de- 
lighted to think that maybe we can get 
some wooden shovels, too, with the extra 
money. 

Our staff consists of a registered nurse, 
the trained worker mentioned before, 
two maids from the College, a chairman, 
an assistant chairman and four volunteer 
counsellors, new with each group, and 
we'd all welcome any of you who want 
to come down and see us in action! 

Susan G. Miller, 1940, 
Chairman, Bryn Mawr Camp Committee. 
19] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



MAY DAY ANNOUNCEMENTS 



ALTHOUGH for once the sun failed 
to shine its brightest for Little May- 
Day, so that the dancing on the 
green was postponed, May Day Chapel 
was held on May 1st, and as always was 
dramatic and stirring with its account of 
academic distinctions, and its lists of 
scholars who are either going out from 
the College, or who are coming here to 
study. 

The forecast for the Graduate School 
next year is, especially, interesting. Of 
its one hundred and forty students this 
year, twenty-one of the Scholars and Fel- 
lows will probably be returning. Seven 
of its members will be in other graduate 
schools, and fifteen of its prospective stu- 
dents are at present undergraduates in 
various colleges, with only one of them a 
member of the senior class at Bryn 
Mawr. The foreign Exchange Scholars 
are yet to be appointed but will probably 
be three in number. The Josephine Gold- 
mark Scholar has been reappointed for 
next year. The Special Research Project 
will be under the direction of the Depart- 
ment of Spanish and so the Mary Paul 
Collins Fellow will be appointed to work 
in that field. The Flexner Lectureship 
will be held by Arturo Torres-Riosico, at 
present at the University of California. 
His subject will be "Spanish Drama in 
the Sixteenth Century." The three win- 
ners of the competitive scholarships, two 
at the American School at Athens and 
one for the American Academy at Rome, 
were announced in the May Bulletin, 
and the three Travelling Fellowships, 
among the most distinguished awards in 
the gift of the College, were listed in the 
April number. Of special interest to all 
the alumnae, however, are the following 
announcements : 

Nancy Angell, A.B. Bryn Mawr Col- 

[ 20 



lege 1938, and Graduate Scholar in 
Biology this year (the daughter of Katha- 
rine Sergeant White, 1914), has been 
awarded a University Scholarship by Yale 
University, to be used for study in the 
Department of Biology there next year. 
Ruth Lawson, M.A. Bryn Mawr College 
1934, at present Instructor in Economics 
at H. Sophie Newcomb Memorial College 
of Tulane University, has been awarded 
a scholarship by the Division of Inter- 
national Law of the Carnegie Endowment 
for International Peace. The scholarship 
is to be used for study this summer at the 
Academy of International Law at The 
Hague. Isabel Stearns, M.A. Bryn Mawr 
College 1933 and Ph.D. 1938, at present 
Instructor in Philosophy at Smith Col- 
lege, has received the A. A. U. W. Fel- 
lowship, announced earlier. Elisabeth 
Lloyd White, M.A. Bryn Mawr College 
1938, has been informed that the Moore 
Fellowship in Zoology at the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, which she holds 
this year, will be renewed for next year. 
She will use it for work on opossum 
embryology at the Wistar Institute. Hope 
Wickersham, A.B. Bryn Mawr College 
1936, this year Fellow in History of Art, 
has been awarded a Franco-American 
Exchange Scholarship for study in Paris 
next year. Miss Wickersham has also 
been given a stipend by the Belgian- 
American Educational Foundation for 
study at the University of Brussels for 
this summer. 

When President Park turned to the 
announcement of undergraduate honours 
and awards, as always the names of Re- 
gional Scholars and of alumnae daugh- 
ters, two categories that sometimes over- 
lap, stood well up in the lists. This year 
the three students who are both, all hold 
Regional Scholarships from District I. : 

] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Ellen Matteson, the daughter of Helen 
Barber, 1912, again also holds the Abby 
Slade Brayton Durfee Scholarship; Mar' 
garet Gilman, daughter of Margaret 
Sanderson, 1914, holds in addition to her 
Regional, the Constance Lewis Memorial 
Scholarship, and 1918 will be especially 
interested to learn that Mary Williams, 
the daughter of Helen Butterfield, was 
given the first Alice Ferree Hayt Memo- 
rial Award. 

Helen Link, the daughter of Helen 
Hammer, 1918, holds the four- year Anna 
M. Powers Memorial Scholarship, and 
has won a non-academic honour by being 
elected President of the Athletic Associa- 
tion. The Shippen-Huidekoper Scholar- 
ship went to Anne Robins, daughter of 
Frances Lord, 1910; Susan Miller, daugh- 
ter of Dorothy Forster, 1907, was given 
the Susan Shober Carey Award; and 
Louisa Alexander, daughter of Virginia 
Hill, 1907, will hold one of the Maria 
Hopper Scholarships. 

To one of our former Regional Schol- 
ars from New York goes the coveted 
Charles S. Hinchman Memorial Scholar- 
ship, awarded to a student whose record 
shows the greatest ability in her major 
subject. Louise Morley, the daughter of 
Christopher Morley, has been awarded it 
for next year. Readers of the Bulletin 
who remember her article on "Peace, 1 '' 
which we carried last year, will be inter- 
ested to know that her junior year has 
been spent in Switzerland, studying politi- 
cal science. The alumnae will be inter- 
ested in general in the rest of the awards 
that mark distinction in a special field. 
Marie Wurster was given the Maria L. 
Eastman Brooke Hall Memorial Scholar- 
ship, awarded to the member of the Junior 
Class with the highest average, the Lidie 
C. Bower Saul Scholarship and a Trus- 



tees' Scholarship. Another distinguished 
daughter of a distinguished father is 
Helen Bacon, daughter of Leonard Bacon. 
She will hold next year the Elizabeth S. 
Shippen Scholarship, awarded for excel- 
lence in language study, and also was 
given, in recognition of an extraordinary 
piece of work, the new Tenney Frank 
Prize in Classics. Anne Louise Axon, the 
President of the Undergraduate Associa- 
tion, won the Elizabeth S. Shippen 
Scholarship in Science. The M. Carey 
Thomas Essay Prize, awarded for distinc- 
tion in English, was given to Mary Meigs, 
who has been Editor of the College J^ews 
this year. This award is of especial inter- 
est to the alumnae who have from time 
to time read her Undergraduate Notes in 
the Bulletin, and who know that she is 
the niece of Cornelia Meigs, 1907. Two 
other scholarships in which the alumnae 
also have a special interest are the James 
E. Rhoads Scholarships: the one to be 
held in the junior year went to Bojan 
Hamlin, and that for the sophomore year 
to Eleanor Harz. 

A number of the Regional Scholars 
were awarded other scholarships in addi- 
tion to the Regional ones that they also 
hold. The list is too long to give entire, 
but one or two of special interest may be 
mentioned. Elizabeth Ann Campbell from 
District I. will also hold one of the 
George Bates Hopkins Memorial Scholar- 
ships in Music and Elizabeth Gregg, from 
District IV., has been awarded one of the 
Maria Hopper Scholarships. A non-aca- 
demic note is scarcely the one on which 
to end the account of the May Day an- 
nouncements, but it indicates the role that 
our Regional Scholars play in the life of the 
College: Louise Sharp, Scholar from East- 
ern Pennsylvania, has been elected Presi- 
dent of the Self- Government Association. 



[21] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



NEWS FROM THE DISTRICTS 



DISTRICT IV. 

PRESIDENT PARK'S very successful 
visit to District IV. was planned by- 
Ruth Biddle Penfield, 1929, District 
Councillor. On May 6th, Miss Park spoke 
in Ann Arbor to alumnae and specially 
invited guests at a luncheon of seventy 
five which was arranged by Mildred 
Durand Gordy, 1909. After the luncheon 
she went to Saginaw where she stayed with 
Ruth Biddle Penfield, 1929. On Sunday 
afternoon Miss Park spoke at a tea given 
in her honour by Marie King Shackleton, 
Regional Scholarships Chairman, Ruth 
Penfield, Kittie Stone Grant, 1906, and 
Mary Grant Carter, 1933. On Monday 
Mrs. Penfield drove Miss Park to Detroit 
where Ethel Robinson Hyde, 1915, had 
made plans for the day. Miss Park spoke 
at the Kingswood School where Margaret 
Augur, 1907, Headmistress, entertained 
at luncheon. A dinner at the home of 
Marion Houghton Mason, 1906, in Grosse 
Pointe presented a delightful opportunity 
for Miss Park to meet the local alumnae. 
From Detroit, Miss Park went to Cleve' 
land where arrangements were in the 
hands of Mary Webster, 1931, and Alice 
Gannett, 1898. After speaking at the 
Laurel School, Miss Park attended a 
luncheon for alumnae and headmistresses 
at which Clara Gehring Bickford, 1925, 
was hostess. In the afternoon, Katherine 
Kelley Taylor, 1910, gave a large tea 
where Miss Park met alumnae and inter' 
ested friends and she dined with Marion 
Halle Strauss, 1917, whose daughter 
enters Bryn Mawr in the fall. 

Immediately before this visit, Mrs. 
Penfield had spent two busy days in 
Indianapolis with Caroline Chadwick' 
Collins, 1905, Director'in'Residence of 
the College, where they were the guests 



of Elisabeth Holliday Hits, 1916. They 
attended an alumnae dinner where Mrs. 
Collins was the speaker. The next day 
she spoke at Tudor Hall. That afternoon 
Amelia Sanborn Crist, 1919, gave a tea 
for Mrs. Collins and Mrs. Penfield to meet 
students of Tudor Hall and their mothers. 

DISTRICT V. 

CAROLINE MORROW CHAD- 
WICK-COLLINS, 1905, on May 
4th with Angela Johnston Boyden, 1926, 
Regional Scholarships Chairman, paid a 
visit to Milwaukee. Alice Miller Chester, 
1914, entertained at a tea at which Mrs. 
Collins spoke. Later, Edith Fairchild, 1936, 
gave a dinner party. The next day Mrs. 
Collins spoke at the Summit School in 
St. Paul and visited the Northrup School. 
A luncheon arranged by Margaret Nichols 
Hardenbergh, 1905, and Jeannette Ridlon 
Piccard, 1918, in Minneapolis, presented 
an opportunity for Mrs. Collins to speak 
to interested students and alumnae. That 
afternoon Bryn Mawr alumnae and 
friends met at tea at Frances Passmore 
Lowe's, 1908, in Waysata before the din- 
ner given by Miss Sarah Converse, Head' 
mistress of Summit School. Back in 
Chicago Frances Hearne Browne, 1910, 
gave a tea on Sunday at her home to 
meet her daughter's school friends and 
their mothers. Headmistresses and stU' 
dents at schools in and around Chicago 
were invited to meet Mrs. Collins at tea 
at the Art Club the next afternoon when 
Dorothy Coffin Greeley, 1911, and Eloise 
ReQua, 1924, were hostesses. Mrs. Col' 
lins also spoke at the annual spring meet' 
ing of the Chicago Bryn Mawr Club held 
at the home of Jean Stirling Gregory, 
1912, in Winnetka. 



[22] 






BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 

CLASS NOTES 



1890 



1896 



No Editor Appointed 

Class Collector: Elizabeth Harris Keiser 
(Mrs. Edward H. Keiser) 

We are proud indeed to learn that the 
Harvard Law School has renewed for another 
year, 19394940, the Research Fellowship 
granted last year to Bertha Putnam, 1893. 
She is not only the first woman to whom a 
Fellowship has been granted by that august 
institution but the first non'lawyer. 

1892 

Class Editor and Class Collector: 

Edith Wetherill Ives (Mrs. F. M. Ives) 
28 East 70th Street, New York, N. Y. 

The following letter came from' Lucy Chase 
Putnam in San Francisco, who was with us 
only one year for special work but who has 
been one of the most loyal and interested 
members of 1892. Many of us remember her 
and her beautiful voice and all will be sorry 
to hear that she is partly crippled by arthritis. 
She writes: "I've had a lot to do, but it wasn't 
of the noticeable kind; and now that I must 
walk on crutches, and listen instead of singing, 
I find myself regretting some of my activities, 
and wishing I had taken to others. Perhaps 
that is usual. But I find this life, with all its 
changes, highly interesting. My deepest inter- 
est now is in the efforts of the Oxford Group 
to bring a better spirit into the world. 

Mathilde Weil has left New York and is 
settled at 915 Franklin Street, San Francisco, 
California, where she will continue her work. 

1894 

Class Editor and Class Collector: 
Abby Brayton Durfee 
(Mrs. Randall N. Durfee) 
19 Highland Ave., Fall River, Mass. 

Martha D. LaPorte is now living in New 
York, 420 West 118th Street. Martha is 
sharing the apartment with Sue Fowler. 

Elizabeth Hench is recovering from her re 
cent illness and is eager to hear from friends. 

Emma Bailey Speer and her husband, Dr. 
Robert E. Speer, will spend the month of May 
in England with Constance Speer, 1930 (Mrs. 
Robert F. Barbour). 

Sarah Darlington Hamilton writes from 
Yuma, Arizona, of her own affairs: "They 
are purely humdrum — some housekeeping, 
piano teaching, visiting and being visited, sun 
baths, drives on the desert, a few good books 
and discussions on them." 



Class Editor: Abigail Camp Dimon 

1411 Genesee St., Utica, New York 

Class Collector: Ruth Furness Porter 
(Mrs. James F. Porter) 

The Class of 1896 and all of Georgiana 
King's friends will be sorry to learn of her 
death on May 4th in Hollywood, California. 
Upon her retirement from Bryn Mawr four 
years ago Georgiana established her home in 
California near her sisters, where she had to 
live the life of an invalid. Her ill health, 
however, did not diminish her lively interest 
in her friends, her work and her college and 
she kept up her contacts with her various 
interests so fully that she will be deeply missed 
in her accustomed circles. 

1900 

Class Editor and Class Collector: 
Louise Congdon Francis 
(Mrs. Richard S. Francis) 
414 Old Lancaster Road, Haverford, Pa. 

Johanna Kroeber Mosenthal has a new 
granddaughter. The baby's name is Constance 
Andreae Kellogg and she is the second daugh- 
ter of Johanna's daughter Barbara. 

1902 

Class Editor: Elizabeth Chandlee Forman 
(Mrs. Horace Baker Forman, Jr.) 
Haverford, Pa. 

Class Collector: Marion Haines Emlen 
(Mrs. Samuel Emlen) 

The notice of the death in April of our 
beloved classmate, Frances Morris Orr, ap- 
peared in the May Bulletin. One of her 
beautiful pictures hangs in the Alumnae 
Office, a constant reminder of her. She began 
to paint in her teens. After graduation she 
worked again at painting. She married John 
Bruce Orr, a young Pittsburgh lawyer (Septem- 
ber 26, 1906). Her married life, and the arrival 
of two children, Charlotte (1909) and John 
(1911) further inspired her creative talent. At 
her farm at Stonington, Connecticut, Frances 
studied during summers with the "Mystic" 
painters, George Thompson and Charles Davis. 
Her work was mainly landscapes, although she 
made sketches of animals and more recently 
of nude figures, for technique never attained 
in art schools or abroad. During the last ten 
years she made portraits, figure studies and 
still lifes. Her work improved so swiftly that, 
although often invited to exhibit, she always 
preferred to wait another year for still better 



[23] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



things. The past decade her paintings were 
exhibited at the "Associated Artists" in Pitts- 
burgh, "Independents' " exhibition in New 
York, at Ogunquit, Palm Beach, Stockbridge, 
Pittsfield and Williamstown. She had a 
notable "one-man show ,, in Pittsburgh, 1936- 
1937. 

This account covers one phase only of her 
life. She was active in social work, sang in an 
oratorio society, trained a children's group for 
some years to act Shakespeare, collected and 
identified fossils, and read aloud to her family 
almost every evening for thirty years on a vast 
range of subjects. Her books are filled with 
her marginal notes. 

The memory of so ardent and complete a 
life brings us a portion of her own sense of 
power and beauty indestructible. 

A cheerful glimpse of Nan Shearer Lafore 
was obtained at the "Bridlewild Hunters' 
Trials," in April, on the Griscom estate at 
Gladwyne, Pennsylvania. This yearly colorful 
event is sponsored by a committee of which 
Nan's husband, John Armand Lafore, is 
Chairman. 

Harriet Hooke Goodyear has a second grand- 
son, the child of her daughter Harriet (Mrs. 
John B. Shepard), who lives in Moultrie, 
Georgia. 

1905 

Class Editor: Eleanor Little Aldrich 
(Mrs. Talbot Aldrich) 
59 Mount Vernon St., Boston, Mass. 

Class Collector: 

Margaret Nichols Hardenbergh 
(Mrs. Clarence M. Hardenbergh) 

The death of Elisabeth Goodrich Reckitt 
has been recorded already in this column. 
"Bess" will always be very vivid in the mem- 
ories of her classmates. The loveliness of her 
features and coloring, the gaiety of her nature, 
her lively interest in everything and every- 
body, the fine qualities of her mind — all com- 
bined to produce an individual of charm and 
distinction. None of us can ever forget her 
humorous portrayal of Mrs. Mossop in our 
sophomore play, Trelawny of the Wells, nor 
the mixture of playfulness and dignity of her 
Mistress Bailey of the Tabord Inn when we 
gave The Canterbury Pilgrims at Junior-Senior 
supper. Her passion for the drama and her 
talent along these lines continued to develop 
after College and in 1912-1913 she joined 
Maurice Browne's Little Theatre group and 
took the leading part in several tragedy and 
comedy plays. She had a voice that was excel- 
lently toned and pleasing; during Wilson's 
second campaign she became a member of the 
National Democratic Speaking Committee, 



emphasizing particularly the importance of 
joining the League of Nations. 

In 1913 Bess married Charles Coleby 
Reckitt. They travelled extensively and came 
to live in Geneva, Illinois, in 1917. There 
she lived until the time of her last illness, 
taking a prominent part in both parish and 
diocesan activities of the Episcopal Church and 
devoting the rest of her time to her house and 
garden. A friend who, as a neighbor, was 
able to keep in closer touch with her than 
could her classmates, has kindly sent a letter, 
which said, in part: ". . . She kept her torch 
always brightly burning and we, her friends, 
cherish and love her for the richness of life 
she brought to us." 

Anna Mary Hill died in Boston on April 
14th after two months of serious illness. Our 
thoughts were with her sisters and brother as 
they stood under the great pine tree where 
she was buried as simply as she would have 
desired in the quiet, little, old Friends' Grave 
Yard at North Berwick, Maine. 

After College Nan taught English for sev- 
eral years at the Halsted School in Yonkers. 
Becoming increasingly absorbed in gardening 
she entered the Lowthorpe School of Land- 
scape Architecture at Groton, Massachusetts. 
She graduated in 1929, completing the three- 
year course with excellent rank. Incidentally, 
she passed the highest I. Q. test among the 
students and refused an oifer to become Dean 
of the school. In her usual modest way she 
made light of her achievement but the fact is 
that it was a real feat for an older person to 
compete successfully with those fresh young 
minds and she had admitted all along that the 
work was more difficult than anything she did 
in College. After graduating and serving an 
apprenticeship with a landscape gardener in 
Boston she rented a studio of her own which 
she fitted up as an office — her "offio," she 
called it — and soon had two or three orders 
on which she had just begun to work when 
illness intervened and prevented her executing 
them. There were many interruptions of ill 
health in her last seven years — in spite of 
them, whenever it was possible, she pursued 
energetically her career and her normal living, 
driving herself around New England at times 
when any less valiant spirit would have given 
up. Even during the painful hospital sessions 
the same zest for life, the same humorous 
outlook, the same interest in her friends and 
enjoyment of their visits, persisted. One could 
never at any time associate the thought of 
illness with Nan — her looks and her manner 
belied it completely. A College friend writes: 
"Last November I spent an evening with her 
at her apartment in Boston. She lay on the 
couch rather tired after going to a Harvard 



[24] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



football game with a young friend. I was 
amazed as we talked at how many gardens 
were still in her mind's eye to plan, how many 
books to read, how many places to go. Per' 
haps Nan's most appealing quality was that 
child-like freshness in her approach to things. 
One feels that if she had lived to be a very 
old lady she would still have had that irre- 
sistible youthful sympathy and outlook. Not 
that she did not have intelligence of the high- 
est order — she was in many ways completely 
sophisticated, too, and a realist in her think- 
ing — but these are not the qualities for which 
we loved her — it was her bravery, her gallantry 
and loyalties, all mixed in with her whimsies, 
that made her such a rare friend." 

Margaret Nichols Hardenbergh and her 
husband had a month's vacation this winter: 
"A United Fruit cruise from New Orleans 
with a full two weeks in Guatemala. You 
all should go there before it is spoiled." 

Helen Jackson Paxson writes from Berkeley, 
California: "I had a grand trip this fall — 
reason, Fred was President of the American 
Historical Association. We played around in 
blizzards, went to Philadelphia, New York, 
Chicago, Madison, and Milwaukee. I did not 
get to Bryn Mawr but Dean Manning and 
F. L. P. lunched with Franklin D. Roosevelt 
at the same time. . . . Jane Ward is digging 
herself into the University and into lots of 
hearts." 

1906 
Class Editor: Louise Cruice Sturdevant 
(Mrs. Edward W. Sturdevant) 
3006 P St., Washington, D. C. 

Class Collector: 

Elizabeth Harrington Brooks 
(Mrs. Arthur S. Brooks) 

1906 sends its loving sympathy to Mary 
Richardson Walcott, whose nephew, Daniel 
Roosevelt, was killed in April in an aeroplane 
accident. 

Mariam Coffin Canaday has set an example 
to her classmates which, if followed, would 
immensely simplify the life of the Class Edi- 
tor. She has sent in a long and interesting 
letter, enclosing a letter from Nan Pratt, with- 
out any postcard prodding! She went up to 
Boston in March for a visit with her daughter, 
who was doing some work at the Widener 
Library, and while there she saw Beth Har- 
rington Brooks, Mary Richardson Walcott, 
Elizabeth Townsend Torbert, and Erma Kings- 
bacher Stix, who was in Cambridge because 
of the illness of her daughter. Mariam reports 
the Class Baby as "the loveliest looking crea' 
ture," which the Class Editor can corroborate. 
Helen Haughwout Putnam is still suffering 



from the hip which she broke at Christmas 
of 1937. 

Nan Pratt's letter is amazingly cheerful, 
considering that she, too, is still crippled from 
a similar injury. She was much encouraged 
by her doctor's using the method of treatment 
employed only for the youthful! She says she 
is as good at using crutches, to which she is 
now promoted, as she was in struggling with 
the gymnastic apparatus of her college years. 
1906 should certainly do their share by letter- 
writing to keep up the spirits of so valiant an 
invalid. 

Jessie Thomas Bennett also visited Boston 
in February to be one of the judges at the 
Boston Dog Show. 

Mary Collins Kellogg's daughter, Helen, 
1936, who is studying for her M.A. in French 
at Radcliffe, had tea at Mary Walcott's house 
with Beth Harrington Brooks and Clara Her- 
rick Havemeyer and her daughter Margaret. 
Helen Kellogg has just announced her engage- 
ment to Brampton Parker, of Cambridge. 

Marion Houghton Mason returned early in 
April from England where among other 
things she saw the Scilly Isles in daffodil sea- 
son. Her daughter Adelaide is at Goucher 
College. Her other daughter, with her hus- 
band and baby daughter, were with Marion in 
April. 

Josephine Katzenstein Blancke is as enthusi- 
astic a tennis player as ever, and reports that 
her form still holds. What with Nan and 
Josephine, 1906 should feel enormously encour- 
aged. Her husband is being sent South next 
December as a representative to the National 
Foreign Language Association. Josephine hopes 
to accompany him, not from any intellectual 
interest but merely hoping for more tennis. 

Ruth McNaughton luckily followed up her 
card by a picture of two of her four-legged 
charges with a note written on the back of it 
because she forgot to mail the card. She has 
a small farm at 1596 Glasgow Road, in San 
Bernadino. She writes that she cannot get 
away for trips because, like all her other pos- 
sessions, the farm "will not stay in order." 

Mary Richardson Walcott left on the first 
of May with her husband on a motoring trip 
through the Great Smokies. 

1909 

Class Editor: Anna Elizabeth Harlan 

3 57 Chestnut St., Coatesville, Pa. 
Class Collector: Evelyn Holt Lowry 
(Mrs. Holt Lowry) 
The Class extends sympathy to Emily Pack- 
ard Harrison in the recent death of her mother. 
Although Mrs. Packard, who was eighty-two, 
had been in ill health for a year, her death 
was unexpected. 



[25] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Helen Crane, who is, by the way, a most 
faithful member about sending in news, says 
she saw Billy Miller Smith (Mrs. Stanton 
Gould Smith) at a concert some weeks ago 
and once in a while she catches up with 
Celeste Webb. 

1910 
Class Editor: Izette Taber de Forest 
(Mrs. Alfred V. de Forest) 
88 Appleton St., Cambridge, Mass. 

Class Collector: Frances Hearne Brown 
(Mrs. Robert B. Brown) 

Constance Deming Lewis writes from 
Augusta, Georgia: "My news is much the 
same. My son graduated with honours from 
Oxford and with 'special distinctions' in his 
subject, and is working for his Ph.D. in 
Thermodynamics at Harvard. My daughter 
was graduated in June from Wellesley. My 
youngest is a junior at high school. 

Dorothy Ashton is practicing medicine in 
Swarthmore, especially gynecology and obstet- 
rics. She is also in charge of the girls' health 
at the college. And at the Woman's Medical 
College of Pennsylvania she is Clinical Pre 
fessor of Gynecology. It is not surprising to 
hear that Dorothy is a Fellow of the Ameri- 
can College of Surgeons. 

1913 
Class Editor: Lucile Shadburn Yow 
(Mrs. Jones Yow) 
385 Lancaster Ave., Haverford, Pa. 
Class Collector: Helen Evans Lewis 
(Mrs. Robert M. Lewis) 

Mr. and Mrs. Julian S. Simsohn (Cecile 
Goldsmith) have announced the marriage of 
their daughter, Jean Claire, to Mr. Vincenz,o 
A. Savanese on January 5th at Kinston, North 
Carolina. 

Marion Taylor Morton writes that she would 
like to renew her affiliations with Bryn Mawr 
and her Class. She continues: ""I have a most 
delightful Canadian husband of old English 
family and one young son who is a constant 
joy and interest to us." Marion is Mrs. Robert 
Blake Morton and she is living at 1007 Saint 
Louis Street, Oak Bay, Victoria, B. C, Canada. 

Agathe Deming was married on December 
21, 1938, to Mr. Homer Arnn and is living 
at The 7 Ranch, Willard, New Mexico. Mr. 
Arnn has been Agathe's business partner for 
seven years. They are adding a second ranch, 
which gives them control of 40,000 acres of 
grazing land. Agathe takes an active part in 
running the ranch. 

Margaret Scruggs Carruth has been ap- 
pointed by John Taylor Arms, the head of 
the Graphic Arts Division of the New York 
World's Fair. She has been asked to send one 



of her late etchings for exhibition, "Struggling 
Against the Winds." She is also collaborating 
with her mother on a revision of Gardening 
in the Temperate Zone, to be published in 
the fall. 

Our Editor is convalescing at her old home 
in Buford, Georgia, from ""a most unpleasant, 
and for me, unusual experience. Having lived 
these many years blessed by uninterrupted 
health I suddenly collapsed in Texas on my 
winter trip. I tried to get back to Atlanta, 
where my family were, but at Little Rock, 
Arkansas, I was taken from the train at 3 
A. M. and sent to a hospital." Anyone in the 
Class with spare time and a pen could put 
both to good use by writing Lucile. H. E. L. 

Natalie Swift is in a most delightful book- 
shop, The Channel Bookshop, at Park Avenue 
and Forty-eighth Street, New York. Lots of 
Class notes can usually be picked up by drop- 
ping in. 

Lucile Perkins Padgitt has moved out on a 
farm, twenty-five miles from Dallas, Texas. 

Helen Barrett Speer's husband is doing a 
notable job as Mayor in Montclair, New 
Jersey. 

Keinath Stohr Davey wrote about April 
25th that the snow is still so deep that they 
can only reach their cabins on skis and they 
are all agog to get them ready for a busy 
camping season. 

There was an informal meeting of 1913 at 
the Bryn Mawr Alumnae Dinner in March 
at the Bryn Mawr Club in New York. Helen 
Richter Elser, just recovered from a very seri- 
ous bout of pneumonia, and Mary Tongue 
Eberstadt were at the speakers' table. 

1915 
Class Editor: Margaret L. Free Stone 

(Mrs. James Austin Stone) 

3039 44th St. N. W., Washington, D. C. 
Class Collector: Mildred Jacobs Coward 

(Mrs. Jacobs Coward) 
Anne Hardon Pearce sent a clipping some 
time ago which got snowed under in the 
avalanche of mail and literature on the Class 
Editor's untidy desk. Many apologies to Anne 
and to the rest of the Class! The clipping 
tells of a luncheon given in Saint Augustine, 
Florida, by the local branch of the National 
League of American Pen Women in honour of 
Sidney Homer, noted American composer, and 
his famous wife, Madame Louise Homer. "The 
occasion was to greet publication of Sidney 
Homer's new book, My Wife and I. Presid- 
ing at today's afFair was Mrs. Vivian Collins, 
well known as a poet whose works are pub- 
lished under the name of Marjorie Meeker." 
Marjorie is President of the local branch of 
Pen Women. 



[26] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Anne also told of a surprise visit she had 
from Esther Pugh, Comtcsse di Tomacelli, and 
her husband, who were spending the night in 
Saint Augustine on their way to Palm Beach. 
Esther and her husband spend part of each 
year in Naples and the rest in travel. 

Hezzie Irvin Bordman paid a flying visit to 
Merle Toll this spring. 

Kitty McCollin Arnett sent me a notice of 
"Four Programs by Famous Women" under the 
auspices of the Unitarian Business and Profes- 
sional Women's Club, I suppose of Philadel- 
phia. The four programs were on Art, Litera- 
ture, Music and Law. The one on Law was 
given on April 28th by Susan Brandeis, of 
whom the announcement said: "Miss Brandeis 
is the famous lawyer daughter of Justice Bran- 
deis of the United States Supreme Court. She 
will give us glimpses of the profession from 
a woman's point of view and will answer 
questions which, from her wide experience, 
should be most interesting. - " 

Peggy Free Stone spent the day in Phila- 
delphia on April 29th at a meeting of repre- 
sentatives of twenty-one national organisations 
interested in backing the broad principles ex- 
pressed in the National Health Bill introduced 
by Senator Wagner. Hearings on the bill will 
begin on May 4th before a Senate sub-com- 
mittee and plans were made for representatives 
of the organizations to appear at the hearings. 
The meeting was held at the Cosmopolitan 
Club in Philadelphia, and Peggy was very 
much surprised and pleased to run into Mary 
Peirce, 1912, who was lunching there. 

1919 

Class Editor: Frances Clarke Darling 
(Mrs. H. Maurice Darling) 
12 Lee Place, Bronxville, N. Y. 

Class Collector: 

Mary Thurman Martin, pro tern. 
(Mrs. Milward W. Martin) 

Dotty Walton Price came on from Cali- 
fornia, making a quick bus trip (about the 
only method of crossing the continent she had 
not yet tried) to see family and friends. She 
was in the best of health and spirits and full 
of her real estate ventures. Just now she is 
concentrating on building an apartment, of 
which she is the owner and manager. Her 
older daughter is nearly college age and if she 
can be temporarily weaned from her theatrical 
and movie inclinations, Dotty hopes she will 
go to some Western college. She reports 
"K. T." Wessells and her daughter "flourish 
like the rose. 11 

Louise Wood was in the East for part of 
January, February, and March, driving from 
place to place in terrible weather to meet her 



lecture engagements. According to unbiased 
testimony from various sources she is doing 
something unusual in her talks at schools and 
clubs and has met an enthusiastic response. 
She plans to go back to Italy the end of May 
and work there on her lectures for next winter. 

A glimpse was had of Mary Scott Spiller in 
Swarthmore. She is teaching again in the 
Rose Valley School. This year she has the 
nursery groups — one member of which is her 
own three-year-old. 

Edith Howes turned up at the New York 
Bryn Mawr Club dinner for President Park. 
She is still at Hoboken, running the lower 
school of the Stevens-Hoboken Academy along 
progressive lines and much interested in the 
application of progressive education philosophy 
to teachers and pupils. 

Fran Fuller Savage reports she has been in 
little touch with Bryn Mawr though she did 
take her thirteen-year-old daughter to Lantern 
Night last fall — both coming back most 
enthusiastic. 

Catharine Taussig Opie and her two chil- 
dren plan to be back in this country for the 
summer with her headquarters with her father 
at Cotuit, Massachusetts. There is a rumor 
that she will be at Reunion. 

1920 

Class Editor: Teresa James Morris 
(Mrs. Edward K. Morris) 
4950 Hillbrook Lane, Washington, D. C. 

Class Collector: Josephine Herrick 

The Class extends its deepest sympathy to 
Frances von Hofsten Price, whose mother died 
in February at her home in Pasadena. 

Nathalie Gookin writes that she lives alone, 
except for a Persian pussy-cat. Last December 
she had a very serious operation. She often 
sees Alice Rood Van Deusen, whose two little 
girls are darlings. 

Run — don't walk — to the nearest news-stand 
and buy the Junior League Magazine for May. 
Here Harriet Holmes Foshay tells of winning 
first prize in the Trail Horse Class, over a 
hundred-mile course through the Green Moun- 
tains of Vermont, followed by tests for man- 
ners and handiness. Harriet rode "Makrine," 
her nineteen-year-old pure-bred Arab. The 
ride took two and a half days; each entry car- 
ried 175 pounds weight (including rider). 
Harriet weighs about 110. There is a picture 
of her, too, just as we used to know her; and 
she looks fit enough for hockey! Of her horse, 
she says: "Mak and I have been friends for 
fifteen years, and I thought we knew each 
other pretty well, but she gave me her heart 
on that trail ride, and it was an experience I 
wouldn't have missed for a million." 



[27] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



We have a real sleuth in the Class. After 
it was noted in the Bulletin that (Margaret) 
Choo-Choo Train SamsonofFs address was lost, 
someone sent me an ad which Choo-Choo's 
husband had inserted in the Rural T^ew 
Tor\er! The ad contained the correct address, 
and we now have news of the six SamsonofFs. 
Choo-Choo does portrait drawings of children 
and is writing a story of their experiences as 
amateur farmers two years ago. Colonel Sam- 
sonoff has a riding school in Washington, Con' 
necticut, where they now live. Choo-Choo 
says: "I certainly hope to get to the Reunion 
... am fifty pounds fatter, so I secretly hope 
everybody else is too!"' 

Helene Zinsser Loening has sent the Class 
a long article entitled "Life in Bremen." I 
would like to print it all — but the Editors 
would never allow me enough space. So I 
shall save it for Reunion, and read it there. 
There is a tiny possibility that Zin will be 
present in person! I do hope you will all be 
there. Believe it or not, Zin's ending: "Then 
I could sink into a social tub with a cup of 
muggle in each hand and dish dirt!" is strangely 
like the ending of Polly Porritt Green's beau- 
tiful poem about Reunion: 
"Come and join your merry Classmates, 
Splash in showers with . delight, 

Sing and talk while in the bathtub, 

Drink! canned cow throughout the night." 
Is that all we did at College? At least we 
must have been clean! 

1921 

Class Editor: Rebecca S. Marshall 
1013 Poplar Hill Road, 
Baltimore, Md. 

Class Collector: 

Katharine Walker Bradford 
(Mrs. Lindsay Bradford) 

Ida Lauer Darrow went to the Alumnae 
Council meetings in New Haven and sends us 
a grand letter full of news. She says: "At 
the first Council meeting was Mabel Smith 
Cowles. Her momentary concern was the re- 
sponsibility of chaperoning at a Yale Prom 
the next night and she insisted this rested 
heavily on her shoulders. At the Friday morn- 
ing session at Westover School I saw Betty 
Kellogg. She is teaching English at the school 
and enjoying it. She is also putting on a play 
at the school. I also saw Julia Peyton Phillips, 
who had come to the meeting. All three 
looked very well and seemed quite unchanged 
from College days. Dot McBride has an in- 
teresting new job as Secretary to the Manager 
of the Philadelphia Evening Public Ledger" 

Ida herself says she has enjoyed her work 
tremendously being President of the Alumnae 



Association. She has three children, a son 
nearly sixteen, and two daughters thirteen and 
ten, both of whom hope to go to Bryn Mawr 
some day. 

Silvine Marbury Harrold and her husband 
have gone to Bermuda for a short trip. They 
won two cruise tickets in a raffle last year and 
have now set forth. Isn't that a break? 

Kat Walker Bradford, Luz Taylor, Darn 
Donnelley Erdman and Teddy Donnelley Haff- 
ner all motored to Natchez for the garden 
tour. Perhaps we can publish details of the 
trip later. 

Your present Editor is teaching at St. Tim- 
othy's this year. In her spring vacation she 
went to Charleston and saw the gardens. 

1923 

Class Editor: Isabelle Beaudrias Murray 
(Mrs. William D. Murray) 
284 N. Broadway, Yonkers, N. Y. 

Class Collector: Frances Matteson Rathbun 
(Mrs. Lawrance Rathbun) 

From Nancy Fit2,Gerald Paramoure come the 
following crumbs of news: 

Dorothy Burr Thompson is staying at Athens 
this summer- — or at least she is not going to 
Toronto with her husband when he returns 
for his semester of lectures there. . . . The 
twins, who spoke only Greek (we hear) are 
now learning English. D. B., however, does 
not feel up to making the long trip with three 
such young daughters, especially as her hus- 
band comes back, after one semester of teach- 
ing in Canada, to dig in Greece. 

Dorothy Stewart Pierson has just recovered 
from a mastoid, and Julia Ward from eight 
weeks of "flu." Julia was thought to be on 
her way to England to finish the work on her 
Ph.D. but her illness upset the plans, we hope 
only temporarily. 

Harriet Price Phipps has come back from 
Florida and is in New York for a short while 
before moving out to the country. She re- 
ports the healthiest winter possible with two 
exceptions, her mother was in the hospital for 
weeks in the early part of the winter as the 
result of an automobile accident, and when 
her sister, Betty Price Richards, was visiting 
her at Delray she was called home by the seri- 
ous illness of her son, both happily well again. 

Since Irene Lemon left College she has been 
to Ireland, to California, to Texas several 
times, but she never really saw Boston until 
her class in Social Science decided that they 
wanted to see the historic places they were 
reading about in American history. The girls 
planned every detail of the trip, what they 
would see, where to stay and all the rest. Irene 
enjoyed it as much as they did. 



[28] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



1926 

Class Editor: Janet C. Preston 
Kenwood, Catonsville, Md. 

Class Collector: Mary Tatnall Colby 
(Mrs. I. Gordon Colby) 

Congratulations to Winnie Dodd Rouillon, 
whose second daughter was born on April 16th. 
Her name is Margaret and she weighed eight 
pounds six ounces as of that date. We under' 
stand that she will have her work cut out for 
her in emulating Jane, who is nearly three now 
and according to all reports very fascinating. 

There is no such dramatic news about any 
one else — yet — but at least there is news, and 
veils of mystery have been lifted in more than 
one unexpected place. Charis Denison Crockett 
and her husband are back again from their 
two years' trip to the South Sea Islands . . . 
and so we shall have to stop making up stories 
about them. He is in the East giving fright' 
fully good lectures (we have that from an 
ear- witness) which are illustrated by the 
Crocketts' own pictures. Charis, when we last 
heard, was still in California recovering from 
"one of those fevers one collects in the South. " 
So says Molly (Star Reporter) Milmine, who 
adds: "Don't talk to me about Southern ail' 
ments. Ticks are bad enough/'' 

Alice Wilt Askew breaks a long silence with 
a welcome and interesting letter from Fall 
Brook, California: "My father and I came out 
here in February to visit my sister — saw the 
Fair and did San Francisco with my sister and 
her sailor husband, and are now down here 
in San Diego County on their ranch, leading 
the simple life and having a grand time. . . . 

"I saw the changes on the campus just 
before I came out here. The Science Building 
looks just like the pictures, but you can hardly 
see it from the campus proper, way down there 
on the upper hockey field. Rhoads Hall is 
stunning from the outside — but I confess to 
being a little gun'shy of those modern fur' 
nishings. I like Taylor better without the 
statues, however. Do you? 

"Beth Tyson Broekhuysen is just back from 
a trip to Guatemala and very enthusiastic.'''' 

Alice had just been to a Bryn Mawr picnic 
attended by all the alumnae in Southern Call' 
fornia, at the ranch of Anna Welles Brown. 
An account of this has appeared elsewhere in 
the Bulletin. She sent some fascinating pic 
tures of the ranch, including one of a genuine 
tepee, and also some action shots showing dis- 
tinguished alumnae attacking a fried chicken. 
Shoulder to shoulder, although with mouths 
too full to shout any glad refrain, they seem 
to prove that the old B. M. fighting spirit is 
never dead. 

Betty Burroughs has enjoyed her winter at 



Foxcroft, though she has been working hard. 
She comes through with news of Polly Kin- 
caid, who had managed to get off the record 
by changing her name last spring. Betty writes 
that Polly is now Mrs. Bert Taylor, and is 
living in Akron, Ohio, R. F. D. No. 7, Box 56. 
She has two stepdaughters, aged ten and twelve. 

Have you seen One for the Money, which 
Gert Macy and Stanley Gilkey are presenting 
at the Booth Theatre in New York? It seems 
to be doing nicely, so you'd better be getting 
around to getting tickets. Gert herself was 
seen in Baltimore by Jane Homer Lee and 
Cornelia Hatch, looking very flourishing and 
with 3\[o Time for Comedy. Of course, as you 
know, she is stage manager for Katharine 
Cornell. 

We are proud to be able to present a letter 
from the far-flung outposts of Empire — i. e. 
from Jenny Green Turner in Dairen, Man' 
churia. Her account of the Washington's 
Birthday dinner she gave couldn't be hid under 
a bushel (neither could the dinner) so we 
pass it on to you: 

"We had the place all draped with flags 
and patriotic crepe paper and then served Rus' 
sian chow — which for quantity and devastating 
effect can outstrip any other kind of meal I 
have ever confronted. 

"I am still taking two Japanese lessons a 
week, and let me tell you it is no easy Ian- 
guage. Right now I am beginning to learn the 
writing out of the same books that children in 
the state schools use. So far I am up to the 
second grade, and every now and then surprise 
myself by reading a sign. But it's not easy. 
You may scoff all you like at science, but let 
me tell you that chemical formulae are duck 
soup in comparison to Japanese characters. 

"Japanese flower arrangement is more fun 
and not so hard to understand, though they 
say you should study five years to become an 
expert." 

1927 

Class Editor: Ruth Rickaby Darmstadt 
(Mrs. Louis J. Darmstadt) 
179 East 79th St., New York City 

Class Collector: Dorothy Irwin Headly 
(Mrs. John F. Headly) 

Two brand'new little girls have joined the 
throng of 1927's children. Isn't that exciting? 
College authorities, get busy! They sound like 
delightful prospects! Peggy Brooks Juhring's 
daughter, Vail Bryant, was born on February 
12th. We hope Mr. Massey will still be por' 
traying Abe Lincoln in Illinois when Vail 
reaches "theatre" age so that her birthday will 
be a double inspiration to her. Florence Day 
Booth's daughter, Sarah Elizabeth, arrived on 
March 11th. 



[29] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Peggy Juhring writes: "So you don't know 
the grand news that we have a two-months-old 
daughter? It's a wonder you didn't hear the 
shouts of joy that echoed up and down the 
Hudson Valley when she was born. . . . 
Haven't seen a soul in months. So I haven't 
any news but my own. . . ." As you know, 
Peggy also has two sons, three and five. 

Sarah Elisabeth Booth has a brother, Rich' 
ard, aged two. Florence writes: "This is to 
let you know of the birth of our daughter. 
. . . We have bought a Bucks County farm 
and all our spare time is spent fixing it." They 
live in Ivyland, Pennsylvania. 

Gordon Schoff came to New York recently. 
She is painting very industriously, has a studio 
in Philadelphia and has sold several water 
colors. She came here to learn about the travel 
poster field and left definitely encouraged. 

Elisabeth Winchester Brandt has been on 
the go ever since January. The Brandts enjoyed 
their trip to Cuba enormously and saw a bit 
of the interior besides Havana. Then after a 
brief rest in Waterville, she headed South 
again, stayed over Easter in New York and is 
now somewhere between New Orleans and 
here or "The World of Tomorrow." 

Bea Simcox is very much interested in her 
work with the C. O. S. in the Queens office. 
I had lunch at her cunning apartment in 
Greenwich Village on a non-matinee day dur- 
ing her spring vacation. Bea looked very well 
and was planning to see every show in town 
that week. She is toying with a trip to Sweden 
this summer. 

We are returning to the little cottage on 
Byram Shore, near Port Chester, again this 
summer. In fact I am starting to get organised 
now and hope to have an impressive sun tan 
by the time this Bulletin reaches you. Our 
latest enthusiasm is trout fishing. . . . We 
had phenomenal luck last Sunday. 

1929 

Class Editor: Juliet Garrett Munroe 
(Mrs. Henry Munroe) 
22 Willett St., Albany, N. Y. 

Class Collector: NANCY WOODWARD BUDLONG 
(Mrs. A. L. Budlong) 

An unsolicited letter from Becky Wills 
Hetsel has finally started these notes again. 
She says: "The T. B. Hetsel family now 
numbers five minors, the oldest eight and one- 
half years, the youngest now eight and one-half 
weeks. He arrived on February 3rd at the 
Bryn Mawr Hospital and is named Theodore 
Henry Hetsel. Last spring we bought a big 
old house . . . almost on the Haverford Col- 
lege campus (Ted is an Instructor in Engineer- 
ing at Haverford)." Congratulations on your 
family, Becky, and many, many thanks for all 



the information. We hope others will follow 
your good example. 

We saw Mary Gessner Park and her thriv- 
ing boy and girl (aged five and four), last 
month, and she informed us that she was 
moving back to 115 West Montgomery Ave- 
nue, Ardmore, where she lived while at Col- 
lege, but this time the household will consist 
of her husband, children and herself. She also 
told us of the fame Rosamond Cross is achiev- 
ing for herself and the Baldwin School as 
Assistant Principal of that institution (such 
rumors are current even as far away as 
Albany). She also said that Amelie Vauclain 
Tatnall has a third son. 

Vicky Buel Thompson, the only classmate 
we found here when we moved to Albany last 
year, has now gone to Arizona with husband 
and two sons, as he was appointed head of 
the Pediatric Department of the Desert Sani- 
tarium in Tucson. But Bryn Mawr graduates 
of other classes have been helping your Editor 
to feel at home here: Elisabeth Kirkbride, 
1896, is one of the most active members of 
the Foreign Policy Association and kindred 
organisations, and Helen Henshaw, 1925, is a 
leading light in some of the many musical 
activities. As a consequence of these and a 
few other activities, we have been so busy that 
we even neglected to report the arrival last 
June 15th of another daughter, Marian Hall, 
right on her sister Dorothea's birthday, and 
actually during her second birthday party. 

1932 

Class Editor: Margaret Woods Keith 
(Mrs. E. Gordon Keith) 
Box 208, Iowa City, Iowa 

Class Collector: Ellen Shaw Kesler 
(Mrs. Robert Wilson Kesler) 

Migs Bradley Rickert announces the birth 
of her second son, Philip Van Dusen Rickert, 
in February. Her older son, Jonnie, she writes, 
adores him, though a trifle roughly at times, but 
they should be good friends, being just 
eighteen months apart. In mid-April the 
Rickerts took young Philip up to Pottstown 
for a visit with Van's father, and stopped 
in en route to see Janet Woods Dickey and 
her husband in Harrisburg. 

With the New York World's Fair open for 
business and crowds swarming everywhere on 
the highways and byways, we plan to retire 
into, our quiet retreat and avoid the mob as 
far as possible. However, before the Fair 
opened last week we took our courage in both 
hands and drove down into Manhattan and 
over into Long Island to have lunch with 
Lucille Shuttleworth Moss (Cockie to us) 
and her mother in Kew Gardens. We even 
paid a brief visit to Queens Hospital and met 



[30] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Cockie's husband, Dode, who is near the end 
of his two-year interneship there. When he 
finishes in mid'summer he plans to go into 
practice with his father, who resides in one 
of the neighboring communities on Long 
Island. Cockie was looking as pretty as a 
picture in a little spring frock, which to my 
amazement I discovered she had made her- 
self . . . Cockie, who in college days couldn't 
so much as sew up a hem. At least, that is 
her story. 

1933 

Class Editor: Margaret Tyler Archer 
(Mrs. John S. B. Archer) 
St. Paul's School, Concord, N. H. 

Class Collector: Mabel Meehan Schlimme 
(Mrs. B. F. Schlimme, Jr.) 

First of all, your Editor apologizes profusely 
and humbly for having allowed the past gaps 
in 193 3 news. Next, she promises to "do 
better" in the future. Third, she has some 
important news to announce: A baby daugh- 
ter reposes in a classy crib here in a Boston 
hospital; and your Editor writes from her own 
comfortable couch in the same establishment. 
Eleanor Margaret Archer was born on April 
22nd. 

Thanks to Sidda Bowditch's aunt, I have 
news of Sidda. She and her mother went to 
the Philippines last fall to visit her brother 
Sam and his family. They left there on the 
first of March and are coming home via Bali, 
Java, India and the Mediterranean. They will 
probably be at home about the last of May 
as they are stopping in London and Paris, too. 

Cece Candee Hilton writes from Cincinnati: 
"You ask about children? We still have only 
one, a son, who will be two in June, and has 
already had an exciting career." Her husband 
is Vice-President and Merchandise Manager 
of a large department store in Cincinnati. 
"Perhaps my chief extra-curricular activity is 
going once a week to the Hillsdale School, a 
private school for girls, to help the group 
which writes and publishes the school news- 
paper, a new and spasmodic publication." 

1934 

Class Editor: Carmen Duany 

Calle 4 Esquina A 7, Vista Alegre 
Santiago de Cuba 

Class Collector: Katherine L. Fox 

Susan Daniels was married in New York 
on April l?th in the chapel of the Fifth 
Avenue Presbyterian Church to William 
Pierrepont White, Jr. Sue's wedding trip will 
take her to Bermuda. Afterwards she will live 
in Utica, New York. Nancy Stevenson Lang- 
muir consented to act as reporter and sent the 
following account: "Susie's wedding was quite 



a gathering, as we suspected, and a very 
jolly wedding it was — the 1934 count was 
about fourteen — so here goes. First heard from 
was Ellie Trowbridge Drake, who called fran- 
tically just as I was leaving the apartment, 
'Where's the wedding? What time?' She had 
lost the invitation but she made the party and 
was burbling with good spirits. Being a bit 
early I window-shopped around the corner 
from the church and found I was sharing the 
space with Kitty Gribbell Carter and Ray. We 
shed a tear that Franny (Carter) couldn't come 
up from Washington and trotted around to the 
green-striped awning. Before we were inside 
the group had grown huge with additions: 
Cornie Hirons, Bunny Marsh Luce, Sarah 
Fraser Robbins and husband. There was just 
time for a whispered minute with Honour 
Dickerman Brown about her new daughter, 
Alice, Bryn Mawr 1961. Then Susie got mar- 
ried and to a swell gent, William Pierrepont 
White, Jr., by name. Molly Nichols Weld and 
the two Lefferts were bridesmaids — looking 
very special in yellow dresses. The reception 
seemed like a 1934 Class Meeting except for 
all the men folk tagging along. Betty Fain 
Baker was blooming. Fouie (Anita Fouilhoux) 
was nicely browned — said a week-end of skiing 
did it but we ferreted out that she had been 
librarian on a South American cruise, so I 
suspect the library was on the boat deck. The 
impeccable Hopie (Marian Hope) appeared to 
have come through her visit to Sun Valley 
unscathed, and an accomplished sportswoman. 
Clara Frances Grant Reustow reported on a 
visit to the zoo with her oldest. She finds our 
weather chilly after Honolulu — spent the first 
week home buying sweaters and the next few 
in bed with the grippe. Jo Rothermel turned 
up that night with her future husband." 

Another man arrived in Maine. Theodore 
Bennett Robbins, Sarah Frazer Robbins' sec- 
ond son, arrived on February 26th, sporting 
blue eyes and reddish hair, to be the delight 
of his brother Hanson. 

All members of the Class who lived in Rock 
will be sorry to hear that Nettie died of 
double pneumonia last December during the 
Christmas holidays. 

Emily Louise Davis is teaching first grade 
in the Friends School at Atlantic City. She 
occasionally hears from Alva Detwiler Fender, 
who is living in New Brunswick where her 
husband teaches at Rutgers. 

Margaret Haskell has been to California and 
back once again. 

Here is a little more specific news about 
Anna M. Findley (Mrs. Charles Jackson Mc- 
Clanahan) and her husband "Jack" and their 
work: "The co-operative for which he works 
is the Midland Consumer Co-operative Whole- 
sale, second largest distributor of oil in Min» 



[31] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



nesota. His job is educational and promo- 
tional work with the membership. Specifically 
he organizes circles (which is the Swedish 
form of adult education) among the member- 
ship of the local co-operatives throughout the 
State with the dual aim of education in the 
field of social and economic problems and 
expansion of the business to include grocery 
stores in connection with the oil stations. . . . 
As to my activities — I finished my work for 
my M.A. in Psychiatric Social Work from the 
University of Chicago in August but officially 
received my degree while I was in the hospital 
five days after Michael was born! At the 
moment I am employed as Psychiatric Social 
Worker, afternoons only, for the Family Wel- 
fare Association of Minneapolis and deal with 
cases of marital discord and behavior problems 
in children. We live in a small house in the 
suburbs of Minneapolis and recreate with our 
friends in a varied number of ways, excluding 
bridge. " 

And now Frances Jones is speaking, this 
time, from 69 Alexander Street, Princeton: 
"I left Tarsus unceremoniously on the first of 
February, leaping onto the departing train with 
my baggage bulging and my fingers still wet 
with ink and pottery glue. A short visit in 
Istanbul and then an even briefer stay in 
Athens before sailing for New York. The 
trip was a fine one, wonderful weather for 
almost the entire voyage and exciting shore 
trips while the ship anchored at Naples, Pal- 
ermo, Algiers, Gibraltar, Lisbon and Azores. 
They all seemed like such lush green places in 
comparison to the more barren East and, like 
Ferdinand, I just sat and smelled the flowers. 
America seemed like the Arctic when I ar- 
rived. I came down to Princeton almost imme- 
diately after landing and started working for 
Miss Goldman. I have a grand office, which 
seems all the more wonderful because it's the 
first I have had all to myself. The work itself 
is varied, though connected with Tarsus, and 
a lot of fun." 

We are still in Santiago de Cuba, spend- 
ing our spare time on basketball and baseball 
and teaching a nineteen-year-old illiterate to 
write his name and read the Spanish language. 
As usual, we are eagerly awaiting mail. 

1935 

Class Editors: Elizabeth Colie 

377 Vose Ave., South Orange, N. J. 

and 
Elizabeth Kent Tarshis 
(Mrs. Lorie Tarshis) 
65 Langdon St., Cambridge, Mass. 

Class Collector: Josephine E. Baker 

Our thanks go to Flossie Cluett for the 
following letter: 



"As for my contribution I have nothing at 
all startling to report. Life goes on very much 
the same as usual, having spent three months 
in New York City this winter doing volunteer 
work again at the New York Hospital, Junior 
League work and any odd jobs that came 
along, skiing week-ends as much as possible. 

"I came down here (Sea Island, Georgia) to 
join the family in March and have had a very 
healthy time with oodles of exercise. In a few 
days we head home from this heavenly place 
to Williamstown, where I expect to be most 
of the summer. 

"I saw quite a few Bryn Mawr people last 
winter in New York, especially at the Bryn 
Mawr Club suppers. Anne Denton was 
around, also Helen Whitney and Frannie 
Messimer, among others. Peggy Tobin and I 
spent a considerable amount of time looking 
up classmates, among them Barbara Lewis 
Armstrong, who was in the throes of law 
exams, at that point.'" 

From other sources we have learned that 
Frannie Messimer has a job in New York and 
is living at 542 East 89th Street. 

Peggy Tobin has been editing the Trenton 
(New Jersey) Junior League Bulletin this win- 
ter, but now she is busying herself with the 
restoration of an historic monument, the Trent 
House. 

Betty Faeth Farman and her husband are 
also living in New York, at 226 East 76th 
Street. Betty is a secretary with the publishing 
firm of Thomas Y. Crowell. She says that 
Betty Eaton Butterfield is still in Lancaster, 
Pennsylvania, where her husband is teaching 
at Franklin and Marshall College, and that 
Bea Blyth was married this year to Mr. John 
Whiting; the Whitings are probably living in 
New Haven. 

To Nancy Horn Soderberg goes the distinc- 
tion of being the first member of the Class to 
have two children, unless some babies are still 
unreported. She had a second daughter born 
last November. We tried to get her name, 
etc., but as the Soderbergs lost their Connecti- 
cut home in the September hurricane, it seems 
to be a little difficult to get in touch with her. 

1936 

Class Editor: Barbara L. Cary 
Merion Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Assistant Editor: Elizabeth Bates Carrick 
(Mrs. Alan Carrick) 
129 East 55th St., New York, N. Y. 

Class Collector: Ellen Scattergood Zook 
(Mrs. W. H. Dunwoodv Zook) 
1936 can take special pride in the academic 
achievements of four of our members who have 
been honoured recently. Jean Holzworth was 
awarded the Mary E. Garrett Graduate Euro- 



[32] 






BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



pean Fellowship for 1939-1940 from Bryn 
Mawr. Jean plans to gather material for her 
doctor's thesis in Mediaeval Studies in France, 
Belgium, Switzerland and England. Betsy 
WyckofF will be Warden of Pembroke West 
next year and in addition will teach the "baby" 
Greek course. Betty Bock, who is studying this 
year at the University of Chicago, will return 
to Bryn Mawr next year as Fellow in Eco- 
nomics and Politics. Hope Wickersham com' 
pletes the list of honours by gaining a Franco- 
American Fellowship through the Institute of 
International Education for study next year in 
Paris. During the summer she will be in Bel- 
gium on a summer scholarship from the Belgian 
American Educational Foundation. 

The Class will be very sorry to learn of the 
death of Elizabeth Bingham's father, Mr. M. 
Watson Bingham. We wish to extend our 
sincere sympathy to Bing, her mother and her 
sister, Kate Bingham de Camp, 1938. 

Matrimony is a very live issue at present and 
we have two engagements and one marriage 
to announce. Frances Porcher was married in 
Cocoa, Florida, on April 22nd to Frank H. 
Bowles, of New York City. Mr. Bowles is 
Director of Admissions at Columbia and he 
and "Porch" have thus set up housekeeping 
at 601 West 113th Street. 

On April 30th, at a tea given by her par' 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Morgan, the engage' 
ment of Maryallis Morgan to Mr. Henry 
Hamilton, of Wyncote, Pennsylvania, was an' 
nounced. Earlier in the spring Helen Kellogg, 
who is studying at Radcliffe this winter, became 
engaged to Mr. Stanley Parker, Jr., of Cam' 
bridge, Massachusetts. 

Several important changes of address are at 
hand and one of them being that of our CO' 
Editor we ask you all to please take note: 
Betsy Bates Carrick, on and after October 1st, 
will be resident at 75 Alexander Street, Prince- 
ton, New Jersey. Her husband is on the legal 
staff of the Prudential Insurance Company, of 
Newark, New Jersey. Edie Anderson Mascott 
has moved from Brooklyn, New York, to 
Larchmont, New York. 

1937 

Class Editor: Alice G. King 

61 East 86th St., New York City 
Class Collector: Sarah Ann Fultz 

Remember Reunion! 

Robert Anthony Zottoli was born on April 
17th to Jeanne Macomber (Mrs. Robert Zot- 
toli). Information from a reliable source says 
that he is everything he should be and more 
besides. He is growing rapidly, so do try to 
get to Boston to see him next month before 
he's grown up. 

Betty Lloyd has announced her engagement 



to Thomas F. J. Carroll, Jr. Isabelle Seltzer 
is engaged to Edward Chalmers Sweeney. 

We are glad to be able to produce news of 
Eleanore Tobin at last. She left Trudeau just 
before Christmas on an indefinite leave, return- 
ing there some time in June to finesse the hot 
city weather. At the moment she is on a 
ranch in Arizona about seventy miles from 
Tucson. Of course, she's busy all the time; 
we can't imagine Toby being inactive. She is 
making the leather belts, purses and desk sets 
which are so characteristic of the West, and 
at the same time writing copiously. 

Several members of the Class were seen at 
that very successful supper-lecture at the New 
York Bryn Mawr Club in April when Kath- 
arine Elizabeth McBride, 1925, spoke on 
"Vocational Counselling." Among the enthu- 
siastic audience were Jehanne Burch, Peggy 
Houck, Ruth Levi and Sonny Thomson. 

1938 

Class Editor: Alison Raymond 

114 E. 40th St., New York, N. Y. 

Class Collector: Dewilda E. Naramore 

I am indebted to Helen Shepard for most of 
the notes this month. 

Nancy Angell is going to continue biology 
next year, but is going to New Haven to study 
in the Yale Graduate School. 

Peg Evans, who has been in the Yale Medi- 
cal School this year, is, on the other hand, 
going to be at Bryn Mawr next winter also 
studying Bi! She will also be a lab. assistant. 

Anne Fred has been studying soil chemistry 
at Wisconsin this year and is teaching English 
at Foxcroft next winter. What happens to the 
soil chemistry at Foxcrot, we do not know. 

Dewilda Naramore has her Fellowship for 
another year at Radcliffe and then plans to go 
to London to write her Ph.D. thesis. 

After Blanca's wedding she is going to live 
in Cambridge where Robert Taft, Jr., is going 
to study at Harvard Law School. The Boston 
Bryn Mawr colony is gradually swelling! 

Of herself Shep says: "After commence- 
ment Julia Grant and I are driving out to 
New Mexico to visit Mary Whitmer, which 
will be too heavenly. I just can't seem to stop 
loafing." 

Bonnie Allen is going to teach again at 
Chapin next winter. She has been giving reci- 
tals both in Bryn Mawr and in New York, 
which have been received with enthusiasm. 
Dancing is becoming popular in Chapin, where 
it was not before. 

The article in this month's (May's) Vogue 
on "Young People at the Fair" is a product 
of Helen Hartman's brain and energies. It is 
her first editorial appearance. 



[33] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



HECTOIY 



Choate School 

A country school for a limited number of 
girls in a town conveniently near Boston. 
College preparatory and general courses. 
Small classes. Congenial home life. Basket- 
ball, hockey, riding, and tennis. Catalog. 

AUGUSTA CHOATE 

1600 Beacon Street, Brookline, Mass. 
• • 



The Madeira School 

Greenway, Fairfax County, Virginia 

A resident and country day school 

for girls on the Potomac River 

near Washington, D. C. 

150 acres 10 fireproof buildings 

LUCY MADEIRA WING, Headmistress 



Wykeham Rise 

WASHINGTON, CONNECTICUT 
IN THE LITCHFIELD HILLS 

College Preparatory and General Courses 

Special Courses in Art and Music 

Riding, Basketball, and Outdoor Sports 

FANNY E. DAVIES, Headmistress 



BRYN MAWR COLLEGE INN 
TEA ROOM 

Luncheons 40c - 50c - 75c 
Dinners 85c - $1.25 

Meals a la carte and table d'hote 
Daily and Sunday 8:30 A.M. to 7:30 P.M. 

AFTERNOON TEAS 
THE PUBLIC IS INVITED 

MISS SARA DAVIS. Mgr. 
Tel: Bryn Mawr 386 



THE 
SHIPLEY SCHOOL 

BRYN MAWR, PENNSYLVANIA 
Preparatory to 

Bryn Mawr College 

ALICE G. HOWLAND \ » . - , 

ELEANOR O. BROWNELL J Pnncl P als 



The Ethel Walker School 

SIMSBURY, CONNECTICUT 

Head of School 

ETHEL WALKER SMITH, A.M. 

Bryn Mawr College 

Head Mistress 

CHARLOTTE WELLES SPEER, A.B. 
Vassar College 



Rosemary Hall 

Greenwich, Conn. 
COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

Constance Evers ) 

Eugenia Baker Jessup, B.A. > Headmistresses 

Bryn Mawr College ) 

Caroline Ruutz-Rees, Ph.D. 7 . , . 

Mary E. Lowndes, M.A., Litt.D. ) Advisers 



ABBOT ACADEMY 

ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 
Over a century of achievement as its heritage. 
Rich traditions combined with modern methods. 
Thorough college preparatory course; also gen- 
eral course with emphasis on the fine arts. 
Excellent equipment. Beautiful country campus 
twenty-three miles from Boston. All sports. 
MARGUERITE M. HEARSEY, Principal 



THE MARY <♦ WHEELER 
SCHOOL 

Excellent College Preparatory Record and General 
Cultural Course. Leisure for Hobbies. Modern in 
Spirit, Methods and Equipment. Daily Sports on 
170 acre Farm. Country Residence for Youneer Girls. 
MARY HELENA DEY, M. A., Principal, Providence, R. I. 



Kindly mention Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 






HECTOIY 



FERRY HALL 

Junior College: Two years of college work. 
Special courses in Music, Art and Dramatics. 

Preparatory Department: Prepares for 
colleges requiring entrance examinations, 
also, for certificating colleges and universities. 

General and Special Courses. 

Campus on Lake Front — Outdoor Sports — 
Indoor Swimming Pool — Riding 

For catalog address 

ELOISE R. TREMAIN 

LAKE FOREST ILLINOIS 



The Baldwin School 

BRYN MAWR, PENNSYLVANIA 
A Resident and Country Day School for Girls 

Ten Miles from Philadelphia 
Stone buildings, indoor swimming pool, sports. 
Thorough and modern preparation for all lead- 
ing colleges. Graduates now in over 40 colleges 
and vocational schools. 

ELIZABETH FORREST JOHNSON 
HEAD OF THE SCHOOL 



The Katharine Branson School 

ROSS, CALIFORNIA 
Across the Bay from San Francisco 

A Country School College Preparatory 

Head: 
Katharine Fleming Branson, A.B., Bryn Mawr 



TOW-HEYWOOfj 

I j On the Sounds At Shippm Point | / 

ESTABLISHED 1865 

Preparatory to the Leading Colleges for Women. 

Also General Course. 

Art and Music. 

Separate Junior School. 

Outdoor Sports. 

One hour from Nen> Yorfy 

Address 
MARY ROGERS ROPER, Headmistress 

Box Y, Stamford, Conn. 



MISS BEARD'S 
SCHOOL 

Prepares girls for College Board 
examinations. General courses in- 
clude household and fine and 
applied arts, and music. 

Country life and outdoor sports. 
Ample grounds near Orange Moun- 
tains, within fourteen miles of 
New York City. 

Lucie C. Beard, Headmistress 
Box 84, Orange, New Jersey 




La Loma Feliz 

SANTA BARBARA, CALIFORNIA 

Residential School, Kindergarten through College 
Preparatory, for boys and girls who need especial 
attention or change of environment because of 
physical handicaps. No tuberculous or mentally 
retarded children can be received. 

INA M. RICHTER 

Medical Director and Head Mistress 

B.A. Bryn Mawr, M.D. Johns Hopkins 



A Book of 
Bryn Mawr Pictures 

32 Gravure Reproductions of Photographs by 

IDA W. PRITCHETT, 1914 

"The pictures are extraordinarily fresh and inter* 
esting, the text a golden mean between explanation 
and sentiment, and the form of the book is 
distinguished." President Park. 

Now on Sale at the Alumnae Office for $1.00 

(10 cents extra for postage) 



Approved Penna. Private Business School 

BUSINESS TRAINING 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
AND SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 
for young men and women. 




One, Two and Three Years 
Day and Evening Courses 
8 Weeks Summer Session 



Founded 1865 



PEIRCE SCHOOL 



Pine St. West of Broad 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



Kindly mention Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



T)eady for Delivery . . . 

A series of twelve Staffordshire dinner plates by Wedgwood . 

prjm jfflator plates! 

Bryn Mawr Alumnae Association, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

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BRYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 
BULLETIN 




^ "mMOTi£§ 



COMMENCEMENT AND REUNIONS 



July, 1939 



Vol. XIX 



No. 7 



Entered as second-class matter. January 13, 1921. at the Post Office, Phila., Pa., under Act of March 3, 1S79 

COPYRIGHT, 1939 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



OFFICERS OF THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President Ida Lauer Darrow, 1921 

Vice-President Yvonne Stoddard Hayes, 1913 

Secretary Dorothea Chambers Blaisdell, 1919 

Treasurer Margaret E. Brusstar, 1903 

Chairman of the Finance Committee Edith Harris Wast, 1926 

Directors at Large f Gertrude Hearne Myers, 1919 

{ Ellenor Morris, 1927 

ALUMNAE SECRETARY, Mildred Buchanan Bassett, 1924 

EDITOR AND BUSINESS MANAGER OF THE BULLETIN 

Marjorie L. Thompson, 1912 

DISTRICT COUNCILLORS 

District I Elizabeth Lawrence Mendell, 1925 

District II Winifred Worcester Stevenson, 1921 

District III Mildred Kimball Ruddock, 1936 

District IV Ruth Biddle Penfield, 1929 

District V Angela Johnston Boyden, 1926 

District VI Delia Smith Mares, 1926 

District VII Katharine Collins Hayes, 1929 

ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 
Eleanor Little Aldrich, 1905 Adelaide W. Neall, 1906 

Mary Alden Morgan Lee, 1912 Ethel C Dunham, 1914 

Eleanor Marquand Forsyth, 1919 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ALUMNAE FUND 
Edith Harris West, 1926 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 
Mary L. Coolidge, 1914 

CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUND COMMITTEE 

Caroline Lynch Byers, 1920 

CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Mary L. James, 1904 

CHAIRMAN OF THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Serena Hand Savage, 1922 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Editorial page 1 

The Rock of Our Salvation: 

Commencement Address by Charles Phelps Taft, LL.D page 2 

Annual Meeting of the Alumnae Association page 6 

Results of Election page 7 

Commencement Announcements page 8 

Report of the Executive Board page 9 

Receipts and Disbursements for 19384939 page 12 

Financial Comparisons page 13 

Report of the Academic Committee page 14 

Report of the Senior Alumnae Director page 15 

Report of the Alumnae Bulletin page 18 

Deanery Notes page 19 

Significant Quotations From the Other Annual Reports page 20 

The Long Future of the College: President Park's Address 

to the Alumnae at the President's Luncheon page 22 

Highlights of the Directors' Meeting page 27 

Picture of 1889 at Its Fiftieth Reunion Luncheon page 28 

Fifty Years in Retrospect: Speech by Elizabeth Blanchard Beach, 

1889, at the President's Luncheon page 29 

Alumnae Daughters Graduated page 30 

News From the Clubs page 31 

Class Notes page 32 



Bryn Mawr Alumnae 

Bulletin 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 

THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

Marjorie L. Thompson, '12, Editor and Business Manager 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, '05 Denise Gallaudet Francis, '32 

Emily Kimbrough Wrench, '21 Louise Congdon Francis, '00 

Pamela Burr, '28 Barbara L. Cary, '36 

Ida Lauer Darrow, '21, ex-ofirio 

Subscription Price, $1.50 a Year Single Copies, 25 Cents 

Checks should be drawn to the order of Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 

Published monthly, except August, September and October, at 1006 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

All material should be sent to the Alumnae Office the first of each month. 



Vol. XIX JULY, 1939 No. 7 

This year marked the fiftieth Commencement ceremony to be held at Bryn Mawr, 
and the College proudly welcomed back the group of splendid women who had been 
its first graduating class, and who by coming fifty-four years ago to the new college 
with its high and uncompromising ideals, had definitely played their part in the social 
history of the country. The nineteenth century was a long struggle for women to win 
the right to the type of both lower and higher education which their brothers enjoyed. 
The measure of their success is that Bryn Mawr this June gave a Master of Arts 
degree in Geology to a man who had taken his A.B. at the University of Pennsylvania. 
An article on "Women in the University World" in the June issue of the Journal of 
the American Association of University Women, gives an admirable survey of the 
whole movement for the higher education of women. The chronology of the dates in 
themselves is arresting. It was only in 1907 that Johns Hopkins for instance admitted 
women to its graduate courses, but by 19354936, 41.3% of the resident students at 
the colleges and universities and professional schools of the United States were women. 
The same article quotes two delightful letters from Abigail Adams. In the first, 
written in 1779, she laments "the trifling, narrow, contracted education of the 
females,' 1 and in the second, written in 1817, she says with complete conviction: "It 
is very certain that a well-informed woman, conscious of her nature and dignity, is 
more capable of performing the relative duties of life and of engaging and retaining 
the affection of a man of understanding than one whose intellectual endowments rise 
not above the common level. 11 And this June, in discussing why the College had a 
right to a "long future, 11 President Park said: "The formal intellectual training which 
Bryn Mawr gives can, I think, be of enormous assistance in preparing women for 
civilised living, for carrying the hard obligations of civilisation in their generation — 
women . . . with or without a job . . . married and with children, taking part in 
family and community responsibility, set on leading skillfully or following intelligently. 1 ' 1 
Here then is the same idea, expressed in different terms, but the idea that has given 
unity to the long struggle, and that in the end is the only basis for democracy. 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



THE ROCK OF OUR SALVATION 

COMMENCEMENT ADDRESS BY CHARLES PHELPS TAFT, LL.D. 



I AM charged with the task of a Com- 
mencement oration. My solution is to 
discuss with you for a few minutes the 
problem that has grown increasingly fas- 
cinating to me over the twenty-one years 
since my own class would have graduated. 
. . . Where are we to find security? Is 
it in those elements that make a good 
living — a job, a house, a family and social 
life, or is there something more to be 
added, something by way of religion? 
What is the rock of our salvation, — to 
use the old phrase from the Psalms? 
What foundation shall we use for the 
house of our days to come? 

Twenty-one years ago, instead of at- 
tending my own Commencement, I was 
in the army and in France, an enlisted 
man at an officer's school. I had put in 
a year with a regular army regiment of 
the Second Division and learned the atti- 
tude of the old timer. There was no use 
worrying or being bored. As long as we 
had American rations instead of British 
or French, we had "plenty chow. 11 Beds 
were good enough most of the time. Like 
the great majority of American dough- 
boys, we didn't have much of the front 
line. Even for those that did, "The sanc- 
tity and importance of sudden death was 
a comforting and salutary thing, a last 
little rock, as it were, in the shifty sands. 11 
"Three squares and a flop 11 stood for a 
security that the boys began to appreciate 
when after an honorable discharge they 
set out to look for a job. . . . 

Man shall not live by bread alone, but 
he does need bread, and many can find 
no way to earn it. Many more fortunate 
people today are deeply concerned about 
the situation of that other one-third of 
the nation which is ill-fed, ill-clothed, and 
ill-housed. Every large city has organized 

[2 



its socially minded citizens to plan an 
attack on these deficiencies. The family 
welfare societies, the child-caring agencies, 
the health federations, hospitals and 
clinics have been joined by public agen- 
cies including those for public support of 
the unemployed; and finally the govern- 
ment has stepped in to influence the basic 
elements required for recovery, by efforts 
at national planning of production. 

Behind all that is an ideal of a com- 
munity in which there shall be a chance 
for every child to grow up healthy, 
strong, intelligent, not only able but 
entitled to make his contribution to the 
common good. A decent house, a job, 
a social life worth living, with recrea- 
tion, educational opportunities, art and 
music, are part of the completed picture. 

The achievement of that ideal lies 
through thorny problems like banking 
and credit, prices, wages, and monopoly, 
tariff and exchange controls, balance be- 
tween agriculture and industry, purchas- 
ing power against durable goods, em- 
ployer and employee relations. So we 
social reformers find ourselves, with busi- 
ness men and politicians, over our heads 
in economics, obsessed with statistics, 
drowned in sociology. Theology is a 
matter for antiquaries. 

That is the culmination of a long dc 
velopment. Nearly one hundred years 
ago a man taught by Hegel denied his 
master, and insisted that ideals were 
simply the reflection in the human mind 
of the material world. Karl Marx held 
that the real forces controlling historical 
development in all its phases were to be 
found in the reaction, upon the behavior 
of man, of the economic position he occu- 
pies. Ideas don't create a culture; the 
practical methods of production and its 

] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



physical and cultural conditions determine 
the whole cultural order of an epoch — 
moral, religious, social, and political. 
That much of Marx we seem to have 
swallowed whole. Our obsession today is 
with the methods of production. We cry 
for action and more action to improve 
those conditions and to discover what in- 
terferes with the proper operation of the 
methods, expecting like Marx, that with 
success in that effort, all our ideals will 
be added unto us. We are certainly not 
socialists today in any sense that would 
satisfy Marx, but his economic determin- 
ism has conquered us after ninety years, 
and economics has become to most of us 
the rock of our salvation. . . . 

Marx's principles won out in Russia 
and that ought to serve as some sort of 
a, testing ground. ... I submit that the 
effort in Russia to build a state capitalism 
without belief in God is what produces 
the cruelty to man and the disregard of 
personality that most observers report so 
far for Germany. 

Come closer home. Do you find any- 
thing to be proud of in our attitude 
toward "reliefers"? Never such interest 
in economics. Never, I think, such disre- 
gard of human misery. The administra- 
tion presses appropriations for three mil- 
lion on Works Progress Administration, 
but washes its hands of two million des- 
perate or despairing people on local relief 
who get half the Works Progress Admin- 
istration allowance per family per month. 
And many of the eighty-five per cent in 
our cities who are not on relief or Works 
Progress Administration complain of 
chiselers and really believe "reliefers" are 
bums and won't work. Some are like that, 
but most of them are ordinary people in 
trouble, treated like dirt. 

What is lacking is belief in people and 
their capacity, belief that every last one 
of them has some bit of the divine spark 



if you'll give them a chance to show it. 
It is a curious paradox that this tremen- 
dous interest in economic reform should 
be found side by side with a distrust of 
those who are to benefit by it. . . . 

A few weeks ago I was in a small 
group with a high administration official, 
where we were discussing the elements 
necessary to restore employment. The 
government man said little, but did make 
this one revealing statement: "Suppose 
the Republicans win in 1940 and all ex- 
cuse for want of confidence is removed. 
How much capital investment can busi- 
ness put into the economic system? Not 
more than two billion dollars, and that is 
no more than government is putting in 
now. Then how can we expect business 
to do this job from here on?" That is 
substantially the position of the seven 
economists whose recent book has had 
such a vogue. 

Now the cardinal sin of a Commence- 
ment orator is to make a political speech, 
but surely I may be permitted to point 
out that the seven economists, like Marx, 
are economic fatalists and have no confi- 
dence whatever in those intangibles that 
we call the spirit of man. 

I repeat that I don't mean to overlook 
the economic elements. I mean simply 
that you can't ignore the spiritual ele- 
ments either. A football team wins over 
a team equally good or better sometimes 
by luck, but more often by something 
intangible in the men who make the team. 
Chinese and Japanese do things with the 
soil because teeming millions are jammed 
into a small space, that even the Agricul- 
tural Adjustment Administration would 
say was impossible, if they didn't know 
it had been done. 

We are accustomed in these days to 
the atmosphere of crisis. It is in foreign 
affairs, or in labor relations in the coal 
mines, or in the British Ambassador's tea 



[3] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



for the King and Queen. But we can't 
sustain the excitement and we grow 
thick-skinned, cynical, restored to self' 
attention. 

That, in itself, seems to me a spir- 
itual crisis. Marxian socialism or com- 
munism will never get far in this country, 
but the economic fatalism and the denial 
of any but material ideals, which are the 
essence of Karl Marx, have come pretty 
close to capturing us, intellectuals, poli- 
ticians, business men. 

Are "three squares and a flop" the rock 
of our salvation? 

Certainly they were not equivalents to 
the Psalmist. He was talking about God, 
a moral being that gave strength and 
health to men in distress and preserved 
them for his service. He was the shadow 
of a great rock in a weary land. . . . 

It was not the economic determinists 
of those days, the business men or poli- 
ticians, or even the eager young students, 
who preserved that ancient core of our 
religion. It was a remnant of faithful 
men and women of the ancient Hebrews 
who carried it through the exile and made 
the Jewish nation. It was the successful 
passage through every kind of spiritual 
strain known to man that taught that 
unknown seer to write: 

"They that wait upon the Lord shall 
renew their strength; they shall mount 
up with wings as eagles; they shall run 
and not be weary; and they shall walk 
and not faint.'" 

Sir Josiah Stamp has shown how in 
the time of Christ there existed economic 
conditions not so different from some of 
ours, with a few wealthy and a great 
mass on the edge of poverty and distress, 
barely able to sustain themselves much 
of the time. 

So Christ's teaching of the New Testa- 
ment was the resultant of the ancient 
reformers, the great burning preachers 



and the newer editors, drawn through a 
mind of simplicity and power, cast in an 
atmosphere of love and affection for men, 
women, and children, and all in an eco- 
nomic background nearly as desperate as 
anything Marx and Engels could paint — 
if you chose to look at it that way. He 
didn't. He even faced a totalitarian state. 

Is that religion relevant today? Can 
it be still the rock of our salvation? 

The fact that it has endured for two 
thousand years is some evidence. It has 
cast up figures like that of Francis of 
Assisi which are certainly worthy to 
stand with any in the Bible. And thou- 
sands and millions of your ancestors and 
mine have found comfort and strength 
and health that made it worth while to 
earn a living however great the hardships. 

The accomplishments of our religion 
are a little more definite than that. Three 
hundred years ago the Commonwealth 
men whipped Charles I. and sat down 
to decide what form the new constitution 
should take. In the army were the Pres- 
byterians, the Independents, and the radi- 
cals, who went by the name Levellers 
among others and were the predecessors 
of the Quakers and the Baptists, and the 
co-religionists of the Pilgrim Fathers. The 
radicals were for manhood suffrage, for, 
said they, God speaks to each man with- 
out the intervention of a priest, and each 
man has a right to say how he shall be 
governed. "The poorest he in England 
has a life to live, as the richest he," is the 
way Colonel Rainborough put it. Ireton 
for Cromwell asserted in reply that to 
give every man a vote would mean that 
those without property would outvote 
those with property, and then take it 
away from them. That in other words 
was Communism. The Levellers lost out 
in that debate and in the Commonwealth, 
and one hundred and fifty years later 
when the Constitution was adopted, the 



[4] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



legislatures which ratified were elected, in 
twelve of the States, not by all men over 
twenty-one, but by the property owners. 
Only one in twenty- five could vote in 
1789, and property qualifications lasted 
in one state until 1851. In Rhode Island 
it took Dorr's Rebellion in 1841 to re- 
move them. 

What brought the change? It can be 
traced I think in substantial part to the 
Methodist and Baptist revivals, the in- 
fluence of men and women who insisted 
that there was a God, that all men were 
his children and deserved to be treated as 
such. Certain it is that democracy can 
only exist while we look on each man, 
woman, and child as a person, a child of 
God, who in some degree can make his 
contribution to the common good. What 
security is there for our cherished institu- 
tions when you begin to think of people 
as a mass of sheep subject either to the 
propaganda of the clever, or the kindly 
ministrations of the wise. Hegel conceived 
of the divine and fatherly Fuehrer, and 
Marx of the dictatorship of the prole- 
tariat, each feeling that the masses had 
to be forced into the mold of their ideal, 
willy nilly. Hegel gave us Russia of the 
Czars and Germany of Hitler. Marx gave 
us Stalin. I prefer Rainborough and the 
poorest he in England who had a life to 
live, his own, not somebody else's plan for 
him. Of course he can't live it in a 
vacuum. It must be in a community, and 
the community conditions his freedom. 
But it involves the slow process of debate 
and discussion and tolerant listening and 
persuasion, and compromise — compromise 
not with your ideals, but with the tempo 
of achieving them, as Lord Reading put it. 

That difference and the sole basic dif- 
ference between the dictatorship and the 
democracy lies in the religion of a minor- 



ity — their belief in God and his power 
working through individual men and 
women. The trend toward centralization 
of authority and responsibility and initia- 
tive in Columbus or Harrisburg or Wash- 
ington is wrong — not because it is Demo- 
cratic or Republican or New Deal, but 
because it shows a lack of faith in people, 
and therefore in God. . . . We need to 
place the responsibility for self-govern- 
ment and self-control on the smallest unit 
where the job can be adequately done. 
We need faith in people and faith in God 
who works in them. 

Our religion is simple enough. It lays 
down two great commandments from 
Exodus and Leviticus. Thou shalt love 
the Lord thy God and thy neighbor as 
thyself. There are the principle of lead- 
ership and the principle of community 
which Hitler and Stalin and Mussolini 
have seized upon and perverted. 

But it says to the individual something 
a little different, and never with more 
force than to a graduating class. Here is 
a gospel of perfection, perfection in your 
own life, and perfection for your com- 
munity from class to world stage. God 
knows we are far from that perfection in 
both respects and if we look on that gos- 
pel as something like a set of laws or a 
moral code, we can't be much but hope- 
less lawbreakers. 

But if you look at that glorious teach- 
ing as a vision to achieve, a plan to work 
on, a goal and purpose for our own lives 
and for the life of the race it has a 
fascination that is deathless from genera- 
tion to generation. 

St. Paul summed it up for the Romans: 
"Rejoice therefore in your troubles, for 
troubles bring endurance; and endurance 
brings character; and character brings 
hope, a hope that never disappoints us." 



m 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



ANNUAL MEETING OF THE ALUMNAE 
ASSOCIATION 

The unabridged Minutes and all Reports are on file in the Alumnae Office 
and may be consulted there. The following is a summarized report. 



THE meeting, a small one, was called 
to order by Ida Lauer Darrow, 
President of the Alumnae Associa- 
tion. After the motion to omit the min- 
utes of the last Annual Meeting, she pre' 
sented the leport of the Executive Board 
which is carried in full on pp. 9-11 of 
this issue. 

Moved, seconded and carried that the 
report of the Executive Board be accepted 
as read. 

Next in order came the report of the 
Treasurer, Margaret E. Brusstar, who in 
concluding made a motion, to be acted on 
by the meeting. It was 

Moved, seconded and carried that the 
auditors report be accepted as the Treas- 
urer s for the fiscal year 1938-1939 and 
that it be included in the minutes. 

It was further 

Moved, seconded and carried that the 
surplus of $109 for the year 1938-1939 
be allocated to the Register Fund. 

Since there was no discussion, the re- 
port of the Chairman of the Alumnae 
Fund and of the Finance Committee, 
Edith Harris West, followed immediately. 

Moved, seconded and carried that the 
report of the Finance Committee be 
accepted. 

The Treasurer then presented the 
Budget for the coming year and asked for 
discussion. The $6,000 item for faculty 
salaries was discussed from the point of 
view of the strength of the appeal. There 
was no desire to lessen the total sum of 
the alumnae gift to the College, but it 
was suggested that a new objective might 
arouse more interest. 



Moved, seconded and carried that the 
Budget as presented by the Treasurer be 
accepted. 

Reports then followed: that from the 
Council, presented by Ellenor Morris, 
from the Academic Committee although 
the Chairman, Louise Dillingham, was 
absent, from the Scholarships and Loan 
Fund Committee presented by Caroline 
Lynch Byers, from the Committee on 
Health and Physical Education, read 
for the Chairman, Elisabeth Howe, by 
Dorothea Chambers Blaisdell, who also 
read that from the Academic Committee. 
The reports were accepted without ques- 
tion. 

This block of reports was followed by 
the report from the Nominating Com- 
mittee, presented by the Chairman, Serena 
Hand Savage. After presenting her re- 
port, the Chairman asked specifically for 
comments on the triple slate which had 
been prepared for nominations for Alum- 
nae Director, as well as for discussion of 
the double slate for other offices. The fol- 
lowing comment was made from the floor: 

"In regard to the report on nominations 
I want to express appreciation for the 
work the Nominating Committee has 
done in getting us not only the triple slate 
but the double slate for Councillors as 
well. I know from my own experience 
the difficulty in securing two people to 
run for each office. When we had a 
single slate it was merely a matter of elec- 
tion by the Nominating Committee. I 
want to express thanks for the increased 
work the Nominating Committee has 
done and the decided benefit of the double 
slate." 

Moved, seconded and carried that the 
report of the l<[ominating Committee be 
accepted. 



[6] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



The report for the Alumnae BuL' 
LETIN was then given by the Editor, 
Marjorie L. Thompson, and is printed on 
pp. 18-19. Since there were no questions, 
it was 

Moved, seconded and carried that the 
report for the Bulletin be accepted. 

The report on behalf of the Alumnae 
Directors next was presented by the re- 
tiring Director, Eleanor Little Aldrich, 
and is printed on pp. 15-17 of this 
Bulletin. 

Before a motion was made, the Presi- 
dent commented on the valuable and de- 
voted service that Mrs. Aldrich had 
given. 

Moved, seconded and carried that the 
report for the Alumnae Directors be 
accepted. 

Next in order was the report from the 
Special Committee on By-Laws, made by 
the Chairman, Lois Kellogg Jessup. Before 
presenting her report she expressed her 
warm appreciation of the members of her 
committee. Each member of the Asso- 
ciation had received a copy of the By- 
Laws with the discussion of the proposed 
changes. The Chairman again passed 
these changes, both major and minor, in 
review. After some discussion of the 
wording in defining the duties of the 
Treasurer, of the definition of the Alum- 
nae Fund, and of its scope, and of the 
method of selecting the members of the 
Council, it was 



Moved, seconded and carried that with 
appreciation, the By-Laws be accepted as 
they have been printed. 

Before the announcement of the elec' 
tions, the President of the Association 
again brought up a point which she had 
touched on in her report, — the question 
of a retirement gift in honour of Presi- 
dent Park. The point was made that 
President Park would prefer any such gift 
to go for academic purposes, rather than 
for a building. It was unanimously 

Moved, seconded and carried that 
since we, the alumnae of Bryn Mawr 
feel deep and grateful appreciation of the 
years of distinguished service rendered to 
the College by our fellow alumna, Presi- 
dent Par\, 

Be it resolved that there be presented 
to the College in honour of President Par\ 
on the occasion of her retirement in June, 
1941, a retirement gift in the form of a 
fund to be used for academic purposes. 

And that the Executive Board ap- 
point as soon as practical a special com- 
mittee to consider the best ways and 
means to raise such a fund. 

After the announcement of the elec- 
tions, a vote of thanks was given to 
Eleanor Little Aldrich, 1905, Retiring 
Alumnae Director; Ruth Cheney Streeter, 
1918, retiring Councillor for District II., 
and Eloise ReQua, 1924, retiring Coun' 
cillor for District V. 

Since there was no further business 
before the meeting, a motion to adjourn 
was in order. 



results of election 

Alumnae Director 

ELIZABETH LAWRENCE MENDELL, 1925 

Councillor for District II. 

WINIFRED WORCESTER STEVENSON, 1921 

Councillor for District V. 

ANGELA JOHNSTON BOYDEN, 1926 

[7] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



COMMENCEMENT ANNOUNCEMENTS 



THE Bryn Mawr European Fellow 
ship for the leading scholar in the 
graduating class was awarded to 
Grace B. Dolowiu, of Brooklyn, New 
York. A major in French, she received 
her diploma summa cum laude. After 
being personally greeted by President 
Park she was asked to take a seat on the 
platform next to the European Fellow of 
the Class of 1889, Emily Greene Balch, 
whose hood she was given. 

Two new prices for excellence in spe- 
cial subjects and a new undergraduate 
scholarship were announced by President 
Park. To Gene R. Irish, of Norristown, 
Pennsylvania, went the Charlotte Angus 
Scott Prise, given to a mathematics major 
"whose work has shown diligence, intel- 
ligence and promise." The Tenney Frank 
Prise for distinguished work in the" clas- 
sics has already been announced. 

The Jeanne Crawford Hislop Memorial 
Scholarship was awarded for the first 
time in 19394940 to Virginia Center 
Nichols, 1941, of New York City, New 
York. This scholarship was established 
this spring by Mr. and Mrs. John H. 
Hislop and Mrs. Frederick W. Crawford 
in memory of Jeanne C. Hislop of the 
Class of 1940. 

The Hannah E. Longshore Medical 
Scholarship, given to Bryn Mawr by 
Lucretia L. Blankenburg in memory of 
her mother, was awarded for the first 
time to Dorothea R. Peck, of Hastings- 
on-Hudson, New York, a member of the 
graduating class, who will use it for study 



next year at the Yale University School 
of Medicine. 

President Park read the following state- 
ment about the Paul Shorey Memorial, 
initiated by 1889: 

"The first class 'ever graduated from the 
College reaches today its fiftieth anniver- 
sary. Wishing to mark the anniversary, 
and to show its gratitude toward the Col- 
lege and toward the teachers of those 
days, it has begun the foundation of a 
Memorial Chair in the Classical Depart- 
ment, which shall bear the name of Paul 
Shorey, that member of the faculty who 
pronounced their valedictory fifty years 
ago. Such a foundation proving beyond 
the power of one class, they have united 
with their six sister classes who were also 
taught by Paul Shorey, and these have 
unanimously voted to devote their fiftieth 
anniversary gifts to this end. Thus, while 
we cannot announce the actual founda- 
tion of the Chair, we can announce its 
inception, and the pleasure with which 
the College looks forward to so appro- 
priate and valuable a memorial of its 
early classes. The last of these associated 
classes is that of 1895; and we hope to 
hear each intervening year of progress 
toward the goal set up by 1889, in mem- 
ory of its fifty years. 11 

Since last Commencement over $80,000 
has been given to the College — by its 
Directors, its alumnae and many of its 
friends, for scholarships, books and lec- 
tures, new equipment for the new build- 
ings, new equipment for the old buildings, 
and for research. Besides there has been 
raised $12,500 (including $2,000 from 
undergraduates) of our share in the plans 
made with the Baldwin School for a dra- 
matic workshop to be named in honour 
of Mrs. Otis Skinner. 



FOUND 

On the campus at the time of Alumnae Reunions — a bracelet and a pair of 
earrings. If the owners will communicate with the Alumnae Office, we shall 
be glad to return them. 

[8] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE BOARD 

PRESENTED BY IDA LAUER DARROW, 1921, PRESIDENT OF THE 
ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 



TODAY we have on the campus, 
as a group, the first class ever to 
hold a fiftieth Reunion at Bryn 
Mawr College. The Executive Board and 
all others members of the Alumnae Asso- 
ciation of Bryn Mawr College wish to 
greet the Class of 1889 and to do honour 
to that class. Our hope is that all of us 
who follow after them may prove as loyal 
and as worthy of the name of Bryn Mawr 
as they are today on the Fiftieth Anni- 
versary of their Commencement. 

As the special Committee on the By- 
Laws is to report to this meeting, the 
Executive Board is making its report as 
short as possible. This can be done the 
more easily as a large part of its work 
is always explained in committee reports. 
However, the Board feels it must take a 
little time to call the attention of all the 
alumnae to the great amount of time and 
thought expended by members of com- 
mittees during a year. For example, this 
spring the Scholarships Committee had 
one hundred and four applications for 
scholarship aid. This meant one hundred 
and four personal interviews for the 
Chairman, numerous conferences with the 
President and the Dean of the College, 
an all-day meeting with her committee 
and an evening meeting with the Joint 
Faculty- Alumnae Committee. In addi- 
tion, she and every member of the com- 
mittee spent many hours studying and 
weighing the letters and references accom- 
panying applications. Yet the results of 
this work sound very simple and uncom- 
plicated when announced in May Day 
Chapel. In the same way behind the fin- 
ished report of each committee stand 
hours of just such careful and thoughtful 
study and discussion. The Executive 



Board wishes to acknowledge here the 
service of all committee members and to 
thank particularly those whose terms ex- 
pire this year. The Board does not take 
lightly its power of appointment to com- 
mittees. The clubs near enough to the 
College for members to be of service on 
committees were asked to suggest names 
of those in their membership whom they 
would recommend for various committees, 
and several good suggestions were re- 
ceived by the Board. After careful con- 
sultation it is proud to report the follow- 
ing appointments: 

For Chairman of the Academic Com- 
mittee — Mary Coolidge, 1914. As 
a member of this committee — Con- 
stance Dowd Grant, 1916. 
As a member of the Scholarships and 
Loan Fund Committee — May Egan 
Stokes, 1911. 
As a member of the Finance Commit- 
tee — Ruth Cheney Streeter, 1918. 
As Chairman of the Committee on 
Health and Physical Education — 
Mary James, 1904. As a member of 
this committee — Alice Nicoll, 1922. 
As a member of the Nominating Com- 
mittee—Hilda Wright Broad, 1929. 
Now as to "the state of the nation 11 
regarding members, there are two thou- 
sand nine hundred and fifteen members 
of the Alumnae Association of whom 
five hundred and fifty-seven are life mem- 
bers. We have lost ninety-eight: four- 
teen through death; sixteen resigned; 
sixty-eight were dropped for non-payment 
of dues. One hundred and forty-two mem- 
bers have been added: ninety-eight from 
the Class of 1938, eighteen graduate stu- 
dents, and twenty-six others either rein- 
stated or joining for the first time. This 



[9] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



means we are forty- four ahead of last 
year. At Commencement we shall wel- 
come into our group the members of the 
graduating class and those who have com- 
pleted their graduate work at Bryn Mawr. 
Appreciation is here expressed to Mil- 
dred Buchanan Bassett, Alumnae Secre- 
tary; Marjorie Thompson, Editor of the 
Bulletin; Alyce Broome Hammond, 
Office Secretary, and Bertha Franke, 
Financial Secretary, for a smooth run- 
ning and efficient service to the College, 
the Board, the committees, clubs and Dis- 
tricts, and especially for many hours of 
extra work at the rush times of the year. 
It is with great pleasure that the Board 
reports to you the following resolution 
from the Deanery Committee: 

Moved, seconded and carried that the 
Alumnae Offices should be permanently 
installed in the Deanery as the commit' 
tee feels that this has been a great advan- 
tage both to the Association and to the 
Deanery itself. 

When President Park at the Alumnae 
Luncheon last year invited your Presi- 
dent, or her representative, to attend all 
meetings of the College Council, she 
opened an avenue of contact between the 
College and the Association whose value 
even she could not have foreseen. Those 
of us who have attended these meetings 
have been privileged to go behind the 
scenes and familiarity has bred not con- 
tempt but respect for the individuals who 
make up the Bryn Mawr of today. 

We hope they, in turn, may have come 
to know a little better than before, the 
Alumnae Association and its work. 

We are gratified to be able to report 
to you that in response to requests from 
alumnae in the more distant Districts, the 
College has graciously sent President 
Park to District IV. and Mrs. Chadwick- 
Collins, Director-in-Residence, to District 
V. and District VII. The enthusiasm 

[ 



with which these visits were received, and 
the interest shown by alumnae and 
prospective students, are the best proof 
of the value of sending emissaries from 
the campus into the Districts. 

In the July Bulletin we shall pub- 
lish an outline of the general plans for 
Alumnae Week-end, October 20th-22nd. 
You will note a few interesting changes. 

As many of you may know, our alum- 
nae books have been catalogued and are 
in their proper place on the shelves in 
the Alumnae Lounge upstairs in the 
Deanery. We have reason to be proud 
of these volumes. The Board asks you to 
remember to send to the Association 
copies of your works as they are pub- 
lished. 

One of our duties is to bring to your 
attention certain matters recommended to 
the Executive Board by the Council. 

The first of these grew out of the re- 
port made by the Special Committee to 
study the question of a Graduate Chap- 
ter of the Alumnae Association. After 
hearing this report the problem for the 
Council was to determine "what form 
of organisation would best serve the in- 
terests of the former graduate students 
and keep them in touch with the College 
and with each other, as well as keep them 
an integral part of the Association. " In- 
stead of a separate Graduate Chapter the 
Council approved the plan suggested by 
two members of the committee (Miss 
Schenck and Miss Sonne). This plan is 
to make next year an experimental year 
with this group, details to be worked out 
by a committee consisting of the Dean of 
the Graduate School, the Senior Resident 
of Radnor, and the President of the 
Alumnae Association in consultation with 
the special committee of which Mary 
Sweeney is Chairman. The suggestion 
was to include a membership drive, spe- 
cial and appropriate literature to go to 

10] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



graduate members of the Association and 
some special meetings at Alumnae Week- 
end or Commencement to strengthen ex- 
isting ties. The hoard approved this plan 
and hopes to put it into effect. 

The other two recommendations of the 
Council were prompted by Miss Park's 
reminder last June that the time of her 
retirement was approaching — June 1941, 
to be exact. At an informal evening meet- 
ing the Council and Executive Board 
consulted together as to how the Board 
could best gain an expression of alumnae 
opinion for the information of our Alum- 
nae Directors when the question of select- 
ing a new President comes before the 
Board of Directors of the College. 

After full, extended discussion, it was 
agreed to recommend that a short ques- 
tionnaire be sent to all members of the 
Association some time next fall. In de- 
termining the form of the questionnaire 
the Board will be guided by the thorough 
discussion at the Council. 

Recognizing that the alumnae will wish 
to mark their appreciation of Miss Park's 
years of distinguished service to Bryn 
Mawr, and remembering that more time 
would have been very helpful in raising 
the retirement gift for Miss Thomas, it 
was recommended to the Executive Board 
that 

"the retirement gift in honour of 
President Par\, a fund of $100,000, 
he raised to found a Marion Edwards 
Par\ Chair." 



At the close of the committee reports this 
business will be formally presented to this 
meeting for discussion and action. 

Will you please stand as I read the list 
of members who have died since the last 
Annual Meeting. 

At this time we pause to record the 
loss to Bryn Mawr College, and to the 
alumnae, of Georgiana Goddard King, 
A.B. 1896, M.A. 1897, one of the most 
distinguished members of the Bryn Mawr 
faculty. A suitable resolution has been 
passed by the Executive Board on behalf 
of the members of the Association. 

We read with a deep sense of loss 
to all Bryn Mawr alumnae the names of 
the members of the Association, notice 
of whose deaths has come to us since the 
last Annual Meeting. 



Maria Bedinger, 1891. 

Anne Warren Jackson Bird, 1908. 

Edith Edwards, 1897. 

Corinne Sickel Farley, 1901. 

Frances Biddle Garrett Foulke, 1889. 

Anna McClanahan Grenfell, 1906. 

Georgiana G. King, 1896. 

Leona Labold, 1909. 

Elizabeth Perkins Lyders, 1900. 

Frances Morris Orr, 1902. 

Elizabeth Goodrich Reckitt, 

Rebecca G. Rhoads, 1918. 

Agnes P. Smith, 1916. 

Judith Boyer Sprenger, 1909. 

Helen Chisolm Tomkins, 1925, 



1905. 



AN EXPRESSION OF THANKS 



T^HE Bryn Mawr Camp wishes to 
■*■ thank the alumnae for their enthusi- 
astic response to our request for old toys, 
books, etc., for the camp. We are espe- 



cially delighted with our gifts of tricycles 
from two people and a kiddie-car from a 
third! 

Susan G. Miller, 1940, 
Chairman, Bryn Mawr Camp. 



[11] 



$12,467.00 


1,995.40 


1,682.16 


700.00 


500.00 


95.00 


$17,439.56 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS FOR 19384939 

Undesignated Designated 
RECEIPTS Funds Funds 

Dues $6,555.24 

Alumnae Bulletin 918.32 

Income from Life Membership Fund 907.34 

Interest on Bank Balances 256.41 

Contributions to "Undesignated Alumnae Fund' 1 12,089.28 

Regional Scholarships 

Science Building Furnishings 

Reunion Gifts — Various Classes 

Miss Marion E. Park Fund 

Deanery Committee 

Contributions for Special Purposes 

$20,726.59 
DISBURSEMENTS 

Salaries (includes salary of Bulletin Editor) $6,470.00 

Pension Fund Contribution 223.50 

Alumnae Bulletin 3,386.01 

Printing and Office Supplies 873.93 

Postage 584.49 

Telephone and Telegraph 75.70 

Auditing 100.00 

Office Equipment '. 47.75 

Executive and Committee Expense 236.63 

Extension Activities 309. 1 3 

Council Expenses 411.12 

Dues in Other Associations 70.00 

Miscellaneous Expenses '. 301.64 

Deanery 1,000.00 

Rhoads Scholarship 500.00 

Payment to Bryn Mawr College for Academic Salaries 6,000.00 

Transferred to Rhoads Fund and Wyndham Debt 115.00 

Regional Scholarships $12,467.00 

Deanery Committee 600.00 

Wyndham Debt 9 1 5.00 

Betty Bigelow Memorial _ 3 1 3 .00 

Goodhart Hall Furnishings 333.93 

Room in Library Wing 207.00 

Contributions for Special Purposes 172.50 

$20,704.90 $15,008.43 

Undesignated Funds — Excess of Receipts $21.69 

Designated Funds — Excess of Receipts $2,431.13 

Credit Balances— May 1, 1938 6,723.62 2,100.48 

Credit Balance— April 30, 1939 _ $6,745.31 $4,531.61 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Assets Liabilities and Funds 

Cash $18,3 56.1 5 Deposits $204.13 

Investments 33,344.30 Regional Scholarships 12.65 

Student Loans 22,797.17 Fund Accounts 63,003.92 

Alumnae Fund, Designated 4,531.61 

Alumnae Fund, Undesignated 6,745.31 

$74,497.62 $74,497.62 

We have audited the accounts of the Alumnae Association of Bryn Mawr College for the 
fiscal year ended April 30, 1939, and in our opinion, based upon that audit, the above statements 
correctly set forth the Financial Condition of the Association as at April 30, 1939, and the 
results of the operations for the year ended at that date. 

LAWRENCE E. BROWN & CO., 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, May 24, 1939. Certified Public Accountants. 

[12] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



FINANCIAL COMPARISONS 



Dues 

Bulletin 

Income Life Mem. Fund Inves 

Bank Interest 

Appropriated Undesignated 

Alumnae Fund A 

B 



INCOME 

Budget 
1938-39 


Actual to 
April 30, 1939 


Proposed 
Budget 
1939-40 


$6,600.00 

1,000.00 

950.00 

100.00 


$6,555.24 
918.32 
907.34 
256.41 


$6,550.00 
825.00 
975.00 
175.00 


$8,650.00 


$8,637.31 


$8,525.00 


$5,790.00 
8,500.00 


$4,452.59 
7,500.00 


$6,101.00 
8,500.00 


$22,940.00 


$20,589.90 


$23,126.00 



DISBURSEMENTS 



Salaries 

Extra Clerical 

Pensions 

Operations 

Postage $600.00 

. Printing & Supplies 625.00 

Telephone & Telegraph... 75.00 

Auditors „ 100.00 

Office Equipment 100.00 

Miscellaneous 100.00 

Bulletin 

Salary Editor (included above) 

Printing $2,800.00 

Mailing and Misc 500.00 

Other Expenditures 
Executive and Commit- 

tee Expenses $400.00 

Council 750.00 

Dues in other Associations 70.00 

Questionnaire 200.00 

Address Book 700.00 

Extension Activities 

Councillors" DisburseirTts 325.00 
Reprint of Council and 

Postage 50.00 

Women's College Adver- 
tising Group 50.00 

Hospitality to Faculty 

and Seniors 125.00 



Rhoads Scholarships $500.00 

Pledge to College 6,000.00 

Deanery _ 1,000.00 

Science Bldg. Furnishings... 1,000.00 



$6,470.00 
125.00 
275.00 




$6,470.00 
137.00 
223.50 




$6,720.00 
125.00 
286.00 




$584.49 
873.93 

75.70 
100.00 

47.75 
104.64 


$1,786.51 


$625.00 
725.00 
75.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 




$1,600.00 






$1,725.00 




$2,903.85 
482.16 


$3,386.01 


$2,900.00 
500.00 




$3,300.00 






$3,400.00 




$236.63 

411.12 

70.00 

60.00 




$375.00 

750.00 

70.00 

200.00 

700.00 





$2,670.0 
$14,440.00 

B 



$8,500.00 
$22,940.00 

[13] 



1.36 



59.66 



50.00 



111.11 



$500.00 
6,000.00 
1,000.00 



$1,086.88 
$13,089.90 



100.00 



50.00 



125.00 



$500.00 
6,000.00 
2,000.00 



$2,370.00 
$14,626.00 



$7,500.00 
$20,589.00 



$8,500.00 
$23,126.00 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



REPORT OF THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 



IN response to the instructions of the 
Alumnae Association, given at its 
annual meeting in 1938, to the effect 
that a further study of alumnae sentiment 
regarding Phi Beta Kappa be made, your 
committee asked the co-operation of the 
Alumnae Bulletin in reaching a larger 
number of Bryn Mawr graduates than the 
three hundred Upper Ten members to 
whom its original questionnaire was sent. 
There were therefore published in the 
February, 1939, number of the Bulletin 
a resume of alumnae opinion given in 
answer to the 1938 questionnaire, and a 
further questionnaire addressed to all 
members of the Alumnae Association, 
with a request for a full expression of 
opinion on the subject of Phi Beta Kappa. 

Your committee now has to report to 
you that up to May 15, 1939, only 
twenty-two answers have been received 
to the second questionnaire. Of these one 
is a duplicate, as the alumna had already 
sent in her answer to the first question- 
naire. This extremely small number of 
answers received indicates to the com- 
mittee a great lack of interest in the 
whole question of the advisability of rec- 
ommending to the College that a Phi 
Beta Kappa chapter be formed at Bryn 
Mawr. . . . 

A detailed analysis of these twenty- 
two questionnaires, as well as of those 



two hundred from last year, is on file in 
the Alumnae Office. 

To summarise the answers and com- 
ments received, the committee finds one 
person whose general opinion is not ex- 
pressed, nine who feel that the introduc- 
tion of Phi Beta Kappa should be recom- 
mended, and twelve who feel that it 
should not be recommended. It also finds 
that of nine professors now teaching in 
colleges or universities scattered from the 
Eastern to the Western coast of the 
United States, two favour the introduc- 
tion of Phi Beta Kappa at Bryn Mawr 
while seven are not in favour of it. 

In reviewing the answers to the 1938- 
1939 questionnaires, your committee notes 
again the large number of noncommittal 
replies to the first among the two hun- 
dred received, and it also notes the very 
small number of replies received to the 
second questionnaire. Your committee 
concludes, therefore, that on the basis of 
the expression of alumnae feeling received 
by it, no recommendation should be made 
to the College at the present time regard- 
ing the possible introduction of Phi Beta 
Kappa. It suggests, however, that the 
College authorities be informed that the 
Alumnae Association material will be at 
their disposition at any time that they 
may desire to see it. 

Louise B. Dillingham, 1916, 
Chairman. 



ALUMNAE WEEK-END PLANS 



/^CTOBER 20th to 22nd are the dates 
^^ of our fourth Alumnae Week-end, 
once more planned to coincide with 
Lantern Night. 

The conferences planned last year to 
set forth and promote discussion of the 
place of certain subjects in the Bryn 
Mawr curriculum were so successful that 



a similar series will be held this year. The 
discussions will be enlivened by the pres- 
ence of Bryn Mawr Doctors of Philos- 
ophy representative of the chosen fields. 
The usual luncheon in honour of Presi- 
dent Park, tea with the Graduate Stu- 
dents, a college tea and opportunity to 
visit classes promise a pleasant week-end. 



[14] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



REPORT OF THE SENIOR ALUMNAE DIRECTOR 



IN the report made at the Council in 
March, I remarked upon the numerous 
avenues for publicity leading from the 
meetings of the Board of Directors to all 
alumnae and the consequent lack of 
opportunity for a Director to bring to a 
group of alumnae anything remotely 
savoring of the nature of news. . . . but 
it was a surprise to me to find the number 
and variety of changes which this seem' 
ingly short span of the five years of my 
term of office has produced. 

First and most momentous of all, we 
must note the passing of ex-President 
Thomas from the scene. I shall always 
feel grateful that my term on the Board 
began while she was still there and Mr. 
Rufus Jones was Chairman. . . . 

The celebration of the Fiftieth Anni- 
versary of the College at which Miss 
Thomas spoke with all her old fervour 
and concluded, — "I shall never again 
speak to a gathering of Bryn Mawr 
women," was, I suppose, the most impor- 
tant occasion in the history of the Col- 
lege since its founding. 

The reorganization of the Summer 
School and now its graduation from the 
campus to a permanent home of its own 
have taken place during this five-year 
period. 

On and about the campus itself many 
changes are so apparent that they are 
mentioned only to fill in the picture of 
the whole: Rhoads Hall, the Science 
Building, a renovated Dalton, the new 
entrance avenue and parking space 
around the Deanery, and now ground 
broken for the new wing of the Library; 
in the line of interior decorating a re- 
juvenated "show case 11 for Merion, also 
there and in several other halls attractive 
modern study-rooms providing oppor- 
tunity for smoking and quiet combined, 

[ 



and repainting of many walls in lighter 
uiv Victorian shades; less exciting but 
very important, much economy in the 
college heating system and increase of 
electric light voltage in students 1 rooms. 

For the principal academic changes we 
have the introduction of the plan for the 
joint teaching of the Sciences; the estab- 
lishment of the system of final examina- 
tions in their major subject for seniors; 
the more flexible entrance requirements 
which, while maintaining our high 
standards, allow for greater diversity in 
student preparation; the increase in the 
size of our undergraduate body made pos- 
sible by the building of Rhoads Hall; the 
opening of French and German Houses; 
and the admittance of men as students in 
our Graduate School. A number of 
familiar and beloved members of the 
faculty will be seen on the campus no 
more. We record with sadness the deaths 
of Professors William Roy Smith, Tenney 
Frank, Georgiana Goddard King and 
Samuel Arthur King. Miss Donnelly and 
Dr. Kingsbury have retired, and Dr. 
Marion Parris Smith has resigned, but 
happily the two first-named remain in our 
midst and we have welcomed an old 
friend, Dr. Florence Bascom, who has re- 
turned to do research work in the new 
Science Building. 

During these five years there have been 
several changes in the personnel of the 
Board of Directors besides the regular 
rotation of Alumnae Directors, a new one 
coming on at each December meeting. 
The death of Miss Thomas left a vacancy 
difficult to fill. The loss of Mr. Samuel 
Emlen was keenly felt; Mr. Frank Stokes 
came into his place as a member of the 
Board and Chairman of the Building and 
Grounds Committee. Mr. Rufus Jones 
retired from the chairmanship of the 

in 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Board after many years of able, gracious 
service; Mr. Charles Rhoads, son of our 
first President, is now the indefatigable 
Chairman and we are delighted that Mr. 
Jones consented to remain a member of 
the Board. Mr. Owen Young's resigna- 
tion last year happened to coincide with 
the expiration of the term of office of his 
daughter, Josephine Young Case, 1928, 
as Alumnae Director, so she was ap- 
pointed Director-at-Large. There is now 
a vacancy caused by the most recent res- 
ignation, that of Dr. Arthur Chace of 
New York. This will be filled in the fall. 
A new member of the Board is Caroline 
Morrow Chadwick-Collins, 1905, who 
was appointed Director-in-Residence— a 
position created by the Board two years 
ago which is of importance to all con- 
nected with Bryn Mawr. Her visits to 
alumnae and to other groups and indi- 
viduals arranged for by them in several 
sections of the country have been most 
successful. . . . 

Five years ago the Deanery had just 
entered upon a new era in its existence, 
and gradually has become the focal point 
of the campus, — serving alumnae, faculty, 
undergraduates and friends of the Col- 
lege in countless delightful ways. The 
establishment of the Alumnae Office 
there marks a milestone in the history of 
the Alumnae Association. The large 
room, so easily accessible, with its com- 
fortable chairs and attractive furnishings, 
is proving more and more a welcoming 
rendezvous for alumnae. Another stimu- 
lus to alumnae interest was the inaugura- 
tion of Alumnae Week-end. 

At the Annual Meeting of this Asso- 
ciation in 1932 Josephine Goldmark, 
1898, as Chairman of a Special Commit- 
tee to consider alumnae representation on 
governing boards of women's colleges, 
read a report in which among other rec- 
ommendations made by the committee 



there was the following: — "That some 
notice of each meeting of the Board of 
Directors of the College appear in the 
Alumnae Bulletin and that the Alum- 
nae Directors meet at some time or times 
during the year with the Executive Board 
of the Association. 11 Perhaps because it 
was wise to wait for the tide of public 
opinion in its favor to roll in, this sug- 
gestion was not taken up actively until 
during the past year when the President 
of the Association invited the Alumnae 
Directors to a luncheon and conference 
with her and the other members of the 
Executive Board of the Association. Fol- 
lowing this discussion the two groups 
have met together twice for exchange of 
views and information. At the request 
of the Bulletin editor informal accounts 
of the business transacted at the meetings 
of the Board of Directors are now being 
published in the Bulletin. An amend- 
ment to the By-Laws which the Associa- 
tion votes on today provides for regular 
joint meetings of the two groups of 
alumnae. This assures a relationship be- 
tween the Alumnae Association and the 
Board of Directors which can never fail 
to be very close and mutually helpful. 
We can never complain that our right 
hand does not know what our left hand 
is doing. In her speech at Alumnae 
Week-end last fall President Park called 
attention to the fact that twelve of the 
twenty- four members of the Board of 
Directors of Bryn Mawr are alumnae and 
that this is a greater proportion than at 
any of the other leading colleges for 
women. Unquestionably our alumnae 
have a large share in determining the 
policies of their college. 

Since writing the preceding paragraph 
a request has come from the Executive 
Committee of the Board of Directors that 
the Association be informed today that a 
committee of the Board of Directors for 



[16] 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



choosing the next President of Bryn Mawr 
will be announced in the fall and that one 
member of that committee will be an 
Alumnae Director. This decision indi- 
cates that the Board of Directors recog- 
nizes that the five Alumnae Directors 
having been elected by this Association 
are its direct representatives on the Board. 
We used to hear much discussion on 
the subject of the length of term of office 
of an Alumnae Director and voices were 
raised in favor of lengthening it to ten 
years. Personally, I am convinced that 
five years is the ideal term— not only be- 
cause it gives more alumnae the oppor- 
tunity of serving the College and knowing 
it better and feeling, ever after, its mis- 
sionaries, but because to fill the position 
conscientiously demands more time than 
most individuals would be able to spare 
over a longer period. It should be part 
of the duties of an Alumnae Director to 
spend as much time as possible on the 
campus and familiarize herself with every 
phase of college life. It is also good if she 
can come in contact with students from 
her District. Certainly she should carry 
the College back to the alumnae in that 
District and interpret it to the community 
in general. The College will exist in the 
minds of her fellow citizens just as she 
reports it to them. This is quite a pro- 
gram and really means giving up consid- 
erable time besides that required for meet- 



ings and travelling to and from them. 
Counting on my fingers I find that in 
four and one-half years since taking a 
place on the Board I have made twenty- 
three trips to Bryn Mawr — attending 
seventeen of the nineteen regular meet- 
ings of the Board — one followed by 
Alumnae Week-end — two special meet- 
ings, two commencements, the Fiftieth 
Anniversary celebration, and a session of 
the Alumnae Council. Each time there 
has been a meeting of the Deanery Com- 
mittee of which all Alumnae Directors 
are ipso facto members, and often meet- 
ings of some other committees or groups. 
In addition I have attended two sessions 
of the Council elsewhere and twice have 
had the interesting experience of repre- 
senting the College officially — at the cen- 
tennial of Wheaton College and at the 
inauguration of the new President of 
Tufts. To say that I have been all along